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Will explain this with a simple example.

class Vector
{
    float X;
    float Y;
    float _length;
    float Length();
}

I only what to calculate Length and assign it to _length if X or Y changed. If none of them changed I just simply return _length.

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1  
it would probably be better to just use the Length() function and have it compute the value on the fly. –  The Paramagnetic Croissant May 20 at 19:04
    
This example is really simple but for complex and time consuming calculations this is not an option. –  Andreas May 20 at 19:05
1  
What is your question? –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 20 at 19:05
    
What you need is more akin to lazy evaluation: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lazy_evaluation In more complex classes, keep flags for when things change and only recompute if the flags are set. –  Pat Viafore May 20 at 19:06
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7 Answers 7

You'll need to include a guard flag (or "invalid" value) that you flag with X/Y modifications through:

class Vector {
 public:
  Vector(float x = 0.0, float y = 0.0)
  : X{x}, Y{y}, Length{-1.0f}
  { }

  float x() const { return X; }
  float y() const { return Y; }

  float length() const {
    if (Length < 0.0f) {
      Length = sqrt(X*X + Y*Y);
    }
    return Length;
  }

  void setX(float x) { if (X != x) { Length = -1.0f; } X = x; }
  void setY(float y) { if (Y != y) { Length = -1.0f; } Y = y; }

 private:
  float X;
  float Y;
  mutable float Length;
};

The mutable qualifier means those values are not part of the "logical" state of an object and can be modified even on a const instance of Vector (via const member functions, naturally).

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should it not be possible for constfunctions to change values? –  Zaiborg May 20 at 19:10
    
+1 for mutable and const –  bolov May 20 at 19:17
1  
@Zaiborg this is like the only use of mutable, and this sort of memoization problem is one of the very few use cases. –  Jeff May 20 at 19:21
    
@Jeff thanks for explaining that, finally i understand –  Zaiborg May 20 at 19:26
    
@Zaiborg glad I could help. You also encouraged me to at least clean up/finish the interface, so it's at least properly const-consistent or whatever now. –  Jeff May 20 at 19:27
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Make x and y private and add two functions like

void setX(float x) {
    this -> x = x;
    handleLengthChange();
}

and

void setY(float y) {
     this -> y = y;
     handleLengthChange();
}

The function handleLengthChange calculates the new length. Every class that uses Vector will now use the methods above to change x or y. Since x and y are private, just add two functions to get the values of x and y.

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i like your answer but not the duplicate ;) –  Zaiborg May 20 at 19:16
    
Sorry I'm on my phone... –  lolcat111 May 20 at 19:17
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make your float X, Y; private and add a bool changed; to your class as well. changing X, Y will be done through setters functions that will also set the bool changed to false.

whenever you call the function Length(); it checks for the bool changed variable, if false then recalculate.

class Vector
    {
        float X;
        float Y;
        bool changed;
        float _length;

        void setX (float val) { // the same for Y
        X = val;
        changed = true;
        }
        float Length(){
           if (changed)
          //compute Length 
            changed = false;
            return ComputedValue;

       } 

}
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wouldn't length() need to reset changed to false as well? –  The Paramagnetic Croissant May 20 at 19:08
    
@user3477950: of course, that is the whole idea. I added it to the code, thanks for pointing that out to me –  Mhd.Tahawi May 20 at 19:10
    
Mhd.Tahawi: Nice, thanks. –  The Paramagnetic Croissant May 20 at 19:11
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make X and Y accessible only through setters and getters. Have a boolean value that tells you if _length is up to date. On X and Y setters invalidate _length (via that boolean variable). When getting the length check if _length if valid. If yes just return it. If not compute it, make it valid and return it.

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Easy, calculate length on the fly from variables X and Y. This way you'll get always the right length, no matter if X or Y has changed or not.

float Vector::Length()const
{
  return sqrt(X * X + Y * Y);
}
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that’s not what he wants. He wants to cache the result of the computation. –  bolov May 20 at 19:08
    
@bolov make things simple not more compicated... Beaty lies in simplicity. –  40two May 20 at 19:09
    
not if the computation is a bottleneck –  bolov May 20 at 19:09
    
I don't believe that sqrt(X * X + Y * Y) creates a computation bottleneck :). –  40two May 20 at 19:10
    
not. But that was just a simple example. He need to know how to handle this is a general way to apply it to complex and time-consuming computations. –  bolov May 20 at 19:13
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first thing that came to mind:

class Vector
{
public:
    void setX(float x)   {changed = true; X = x;}
    void setY(float y)   {changed = true; Y = y;}

    float length()
    {
        if (changed)
            // calculate

        changed = false;
        return _Length;
    }
private:
    floate X, Y, _Length;
    bool changed;
};

edit: i hope now the formating works ...

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make changed false after computing it –  bolov May 20 at 19:07
    
wouldn't length() need to reset changed to false? –  The Paramagnetic Croissant May 20 at 19:07
    
thanks ... semantic error caused by fast codeing ,) –  Zaiborg May 20 at 19:09
    
racing to have the first answer. Patch it later. :) –  bolov May 20 at 19:11
    
@bolov yeah something like 'oh, i can answer that ... ataaaaack' –  Zaiborg May 20 at 19:12
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An alternative to maintaining guard flags or "invalid" values as suggested by Jeff would be to use nullable objects such as pointers, preferably smart pointers. This may be more appropriate when the cache is an object larger than a float.

class Vector {
  float X;
  float Y;
  mutable std::unique_ptr<float> length_;

 public:
  Vector() : X(0.0f), Y(0.0f) { }
  Vector(float x, float y) : X(x), Y(y) { }

  float x() const { return X; }
  float y() const { return Y; }

  float length() const {
    if (!length_)
      length_ = std::unique_ptr<float>(new float(sqrt(X*X + Y*Y)));
    return *length_;
  }

  void setX(float x) { if (X != x) { length_.reset(); X = x; } }
  void setY(float y) { if (Y != y) { length_.reset(); Y = y; } }
};
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