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I am trying to implement a Photoshop style color filtering feature in my application. I have a Bitmap, and 4 check-boxes (R,G,B,A). I wanted to know what is the fastest way of doing it

Currently I am doing it as follows

        Byte[] rgbValues = new Byte[data.Stride * data.Height];
        for (int row = 0; row < data.Height; row++)
        {
            // Loop through each pixel on this scan line
            int bufPos = (m_height - row - 1) * m_width;
            int index = row * data.Stride;
            for (int col = 0; col < data.Width; col++, bufPos++, index += 4)
            {
                bool drawCheckerBoard = true; // for alpha
                UInt32 rgba = m_image[bufPos];
                UInt32 r =  EnableRedChannel ? ((rgba >> 0) & 0xFF) : 0x00;
                UInt32 g =  EnableGreenChannel ? ((rgba >> 8) & 0xFF) : 0x00;
                UInt32 b =  EnableBlueChannel ? ((rgba >> 16) & 0xFF) : 0x00;
                UInt32 a = (rgba >> 24) & 0xFF;
                ...
                ...
            }
        }

and then the usual Marshal.Copy and unlock bits etc...

As you can see it is not really an optimized way, I wanted some suggestions for a faster method.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Is it actually slow? – Mitch Wheat Mar 4 '10 at 4:54

It's unclear what you want to do with the individual r,g,b & a values, but one thing I see right off is that you can move your enable flags out of the loop.

   UInt32 rMask = EnableRedChannel   ? 0x000000FF : 00;
   UInt32 gMask = EnableGreenChannel ? 0x0000FF00 : 00;
   UInt32 bMask = EnableBlueChannel  ? 0x00FF0000 : 00;
   UInt32 aMask = 0xFF000000;

   for (int row = 0; row < data.Height; row++)
    {
        // Loop through each pixel on this scan line
        int bufPos = (m_height - row - 1) * m_width;
        int index = row * data.Stride;
        for (int col = 0; col < data.Width; col++, bufPos++, index += 4)
        {
            bool drawCheckerBoard = true; // for alpha
            UInt32 rgba = m_image[bufPos];
            UInt32 r =  (rgba & aMask) >> 0;
            UInt32 g =  (rgba & gMask) >> 8;
            UInt32 b =  (rgba & bMask) >> 16;
            UInt32 a =  (rgba & aMask) >> 24;
            ...
            ...
        }
    }

Going one step beyond that, you can build a composite mask if you don't actually need to pull out the r,g,b& a values.

   UInt32 mask  = 0xFF000000;
   if (EnableRedChannel)
      mask |= 0x000000FF;
   if (EnableGreenChannel)
      mask |= 0x0000FF00;
   if (EnableBlueChannel)
      mask |= 0x00FF0000;

   for (int row = 0; row < data.Height; row++)
    {
        // Loop through each pixel on this scan line
        int bufPos = (m_height - row - 1) * m_width;
        int index = row * data.Stride;
        for (int col = 0; col < data.Width; col++, bufPos++, index += 4)
        {
            bool drawCheckerBoard = true; // for alpha
            UInt32 rgba = m_image[bufPos] & mask;
            ...
            ...
        }
    }

You might also find it helpful to have your of your m_image[] be an array of bytes, this would make it easier to pick out the individual color channels just by adjusting your offset and stride through the data.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks.. Will try that... – ababeel Mar 4 '10 at 5:01

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