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According to this link, if no call to the super constructor is declared in a class constructor, a parameter-less call to super will be declared as the first thing in the constructor.

How can I avoid this call? I thought that something like this would work:

if (false){
    super(); 
}
graphics.beginFill(0x000099);
graphics.drawRect(0, 0, width, height);

but I am still getting the functionality from the super call, and when I add a trace super is still being called. I don't want this to happen, because the two objects look completely different and their graphics get set up in the constructor.

I suppose I could always restructure the code so that all the constructor has is

this.addEventListener(Event.ADDED_TO_STAGE, initialize);

and override the initialize function to draw the graphics, but I would still like to know why this is not working.

UPDATE: If I change the code to

if(1==2)

then the super constructor is not called. Why doesn't this work with if(false)?

share|improve this question

Move your login into an init() method. In your superclass call the init() method.

In your subclass, override the init method and don't put anything in there.

There you go, you avoid the superclass's logic.

share|improve this answer
up vote 3 down vote accepted

According to some comments I just read, this is not a good idea. By avoiding the super call, any instance variables that are set in the super class will not get instantiated, so if you have:

public class Object1{
    var message:String() = "this is my message";

    public function Object1(){
        trace("Parent: " + message);
    }

}

public class Object2 extends Object1{
    public function Object2(){
        trace("Child: " + message;
    }
}

the result will be

Child: null

So long story short, best practice for avoiding constructor logic is to do something like this:

public class Object1{
    public function Object1(){
        addEventListener(Event.ADDED_TO_STAGE, init); //or just call init directly
    }
    protected function init(e:Event){
        //do stuff here
    }
}

public class Object2 extends Object1{
    public function Object2(){
        super(); //or leave it blank and it will call automatically
    }
    override protected function init(e:Event){
        //do other stuff here
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I'm not sure if that if(1==2) statement is working right (I'd assume no but it doesn't matter).

What you're trying to do is wrong - your class has a base class and when you create an instance of your class, you want the base class to be properly initialized - this is the purpose of calling the constructor.

The ability to call super() is in place not to circumvent calling it but to enable you to control exactly when it's called so you can call other things before / after calling the base class constructor.

If you have multiple classes deriving from the same base class but they have so different properties that calling the base class constructor breaks one, you set up your classes the wrong way.

If there's only minor difference between these classes, you can work around that by calling a function in the derived class (by defining a function in the base class and then overriding it in the derived class). Based on what you wrote, it seems like this may be the right approach for you - in the base, have a SetGraphics() function and then override that function in the derived classes. Call SetGraphics() from the base class constructor. Something like:

public class BaseClass
{
    public function BaseClass ()
    {
        ...
        SetGraphics ();
        ...
    }

    protected function SetGraphics ():void
    {
        // Do nothing here (or throw error - this function
        // should be overridden by derived classes)
    }
}

public class DerivedClass1 extends BaseClass
{
    public function DerivedClass1 ()
    {
        // If the base class constructor doesn't take any
        // parameters, this call is optional (it'll be made
        // for you if you omit it).
        super ();
    }

    protected override function SetGraphics ():void
    {
        // load graphics appropriate for DerivedClass1
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's pretty much the solution I came up with as well. Now the only thing left bugging me from this question is why if(false) super(); was still firing. Any ideas? – Joshua Zollinger May 20 '14 at 21:57
    
@JoshuaZollinger I'd expect the base class to be called - the base class must be initialized for your derived class to work. So I think that gave you the right behavior. Why if (1==2) failed to call the base constructor is a mystery - I'd call that a bug in the Flash player. I dont' have Flash handy at the moment so I can't test it right now. – xxbbcc May 20 '14 at 21:59
    
Downvoter: care to leave a comment about your downvote? – xxbbcc Jun 9 '14 at 15:20

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