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I am using three inputs to create a form for the user to enter their phone number.

The first input is for a three digit area code (111 111 2312), the second is for the first three digits of the phone number (111 111 2312), and the last input is for the last four digits of the phone number (111 111 2312).

When the form is submit, I am using this regex code to make sure the inputs are entered correctly. The code is supposed to make sure there is three numbers in the first two inputs, and four numbers in the third input. It is also supposed to make sure that only numbers have been entered. My regex code does not work even if there is less than the desired amount of numbers, and also doesn't work if there are letters entered.

var phoneno = /^\d{3}$/;  
if(document.forms["myForm"]["phone1"].value.match(phoneno))  
{   
}  
else  
{  
    alert("You have entered an invalid Area Code");  
    return false;  
}  
var phoneno1 = /^\d{3}$/;  
if(document.forms["myForm"]["phone2"].value.match(phoneno1))  
{   
}  
else  
{  
    alert("Not a valid Phone Number");  
    return false;  
}  
var phoneno2 = /^\d{4}$/;  
if(document.forms["myForm"]["phone3"].value.match(phoneno2))  
{   
}  
else  
{  
    alert("Not a valid Phone Number");  
    return false;  
}  

Thank you for any help, all help is greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
Id' use one input instead of three, with a placeholder, an a single regex. Also if it's US phones, you should leave out phones that start with a 0 or 1, as they aren't valid, and it is very common for people to enter things like 123-456-7890. – elclanrs May 20 '14 at 22:48
    
As elclanrs said, use a single field. Trim all whitespace, then test that you have 10 digits. There are likely databases of valid telephone numbers that you can check against, or just accept what the user puts in. Oh, and more semantic to use test: phoneno2.test(document.forms["myForm"]["phone3"].value). – RobG May 20 '14 at 22:50
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The comments are correct, I think you should use one field to collect the value and check that with regex. You could then simplify the whole thing. And you may still allow the user the flexibility to punctuate the number if your wish.

I think it is better to use test() in your instance as match has unnecessary overhead, it will give you the right result but will use more resource. Thats probably negligible in this scenario but a good thing to get in to the habit of doing.

I some times use a butter knife to undo a screw but a screwdriver would be better.

As it stands I think your regex works

var a = 111;
var b = 111;
var c = 4444;
var phoneno = /^\d{3}$/;  
var phoneno1 = /^\d{3}$/;
var phoneno2 = /^\d{4}$/;    
console.log(phoneno.test(a));
console.log(phoneno1.test(b));
console.log(phoneno2.test(c));

To simplify you could simply use a regex like.

var d = '111 222 3333';
var patt = /[0-9]{10}/;
d = d.replace(/[- ]+/g,'') //replace whitespaces and hyphens with nothing;
console.log(patt.test(d))

Obviously your if else will replace the consoles in either scenario.
I noticed along the way is you are using return false is that because this is a piece of a function and we are not seeing the whole of it?

share|improve this answer

Does your form tag look like this?

<form onsubmit="validate()">

If so, remember to add return before the call to validate(), like this:

<form onsubmit="return validate()">

Otherwise, your validation does work, but the return false; will not stop the form submission unless you add the return in the onsubmit attribute.

If you keep the 3 fields (though you should consider @elclanrs's idea), then you should update the first regex for phoneno to

var phoneno = /^[2-9]\d{2}$/;

This will enforce area code does not start with 0 or 1.

share|improve this answer

I've used your code and this works perfectly. I've done this code as example to check your code and works:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
    function isValidPhone(){
    var phoneno = /^\d{3}$/;  
      if(!document.forms["myForm"]["phone1"].value.match(phoneno))  
      {  
         alert("You have entered an invalid Area Code");  
         return false;  
      }  
      var phoneno1 = /^\d{3}$/;  
      if(!document.forms["myForm"]["phone2"].value.match(phoneno1))  
      {  
         alert("Not a valid Phone Number");  
         return false;  
      }  
        var phoneno2 = /^\d{4}$/;  
      if(!document.forms["myForm"]["phone3"].value.match(phoneno2))  
      {  
         alert("Not a valid Phone Number");  
         return false;  
      } 

    return true;
    }
</script>
</head>
<body>

    <h3>Enter a phone:</h3>

    <form name="myForm" action="#" onsubmit="return isValidPhone();" method="post" enctype="text/plain">
        Phone1:<br>
        <input type="text" name="phone1"><br/>
        Phone2:<br>
        <input type="text" name="phone2"><br/>
        Phone3:<br>
        <input type="text" name="phone3"><br/>
        <input type="submit" value="Send">
        <input type="reset" value="Reset">
    </form>

</body>
</html>

However, I think the best is to use only one field as @elclanrs says, but I don't know if you do this code in this way for any specific reason. I hope my example be useful for you.

If you want to use only one field, the regex should be as below (this allows a whitespace between the groups of numbers):

/^\d{3}\s\d{3}\s\d{4}$/
share|improve this answer

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