Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Often, I'll add an event handler to a dojo widget. For example, a handler for the change event. Then, something in my code will trigger the change event - but I don't know what. So, normally you just set a breakpoint in your favorite debugger, and then look at the call stack, and you can quickly trace what caused the event to fire. But, often my active call stack ends at dojo's lang.hitch, which I'm guessing is because dojo passes the function to window.setTimeout, and so most of the useful information in the call stack is gone when the func gets executed on the js event queue.

Here's a small executable sample.

<b id="cb"></b>
<script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/dojo/1.9.3/dojo/dojo.js"></script>
<script>
require(["dijit/form/CheckBox", "dojo/domReady!"], function(CheckBox){
    var checkBox = new CheckBox({
        onChange: function(b){
            console.log(b);
        }
    }, "cb");

    // manually trigger change event.
    // i want to be able to see this line in the debuggers call stack.
    checkBox.set("checked", true);
});
</script>

Is there an easy way to overcome this annoying debugging impediment? Like maybe, a setting that tells dojo not to execute event handlers via setTimeout?

In this case, it appears that _WidgetBase.js defer() is the one calling setTimeout, but I know I encounter this issue very frequently in dojo, and was hoping there's a better way than editing their source.

share|improve this question
    
Have you seen the article Debugging Asynchronous JavaScript with Chrome DevTools? – JoseM May 21 '14 at 4:45
    
@JoseM that's better than I could have ever hoped for :) You should post it as an answer. – goat May 21 '14 at 5:01
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Chrome Canary (build 35 and higher) now has the ability to debug asynchronous javascript which is what you are trying to do. See the article Debugging Asynchronous JavaScript with Chrome DevTools

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.