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I am trying to pass array parameter to SQL commnd in C# like below, but it does not work. Does anyone meet it before?

string sqlCommand = "SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN (@Age)";
SqlConnection sqlCon = new SqlConnection(connectString);
SqlCommand sqlComm = new SqlCommand();
sqlComm.Connection = sqlCon;
sqlComm.CommandType = System.Data.CommandType.Text;
sqlComm.CommandText = sqlCommand;
sqlComm.CommandTimeout = 300;
sqlComm.Parameters.Add("@Age", SqlDbType.NVarChar);
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
foreach (ListItem item in ddlAge.Items)
{
     if (item.Selected)
     {
         sb.Append(item.Text + ",");
     }
}

sqlComm.Parameters["@Age"].Value = sb.ToString().TrimEnd(',');
share|improve this question
5  
Not really the topic, but it seems to me like having Age as a column in a table is a bad idea, since it will need to be updated constantly. People get older right? Maybe you should consider having a column DateOfBirth instead? – Kjetil Watnedal Mar 4 '10 at 9:52
    
question with good answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/83471/… – Adam Butler Feb 17 '12 at 5:42
up vote 51 down vote accepted

You will need to add the values in the array one at a time.

var parameters = new string[items.Length];
var cmd = new SqlCommand();
for (int i = 0; i < items.Length; i++)
{
    parameters[i] = string.Format("@Age{0}", i);
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue(parameters[i], items[i]);
}

cmd.CommandText = string.Format("SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN ({0})", string.Join(", ", parameters));
cmd.Connection = new SqlConnection(connStr);

UPDATE: Here is an extended and reusable solution that uses Adam's answer along with his suggested edit. I improved it a bit and made it an extension method to make it even easier to call.

public static class SqlCommandExt
{
    /// <summary>
    /// This will add an array of parameters to a SqlCommand. This is used for an IN statement.
    /// Use the returned value for the IN part of your SQL call. (i.e. SELECT * FROM table WHERE field IN ({paramNameRoot}))
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="cmd">The SqlCommand object to add parameters to.</param>
    /// <param name="values">The array of strings that need to be added as parameters.</param>
    /// <param name="paramNameRoot">What the parameter should be named followed by a unique value for each value. This value surrounded by {} in the CommandText will be replaced.</param>
    /// <param name="start">The beginning number to append to the end of paramNameRoot for each value.</param>
    /// <param name="separator">The string that separates the parameter names in the sql command.</param>
    public static SqlParameter[] AddArrayParameters<T>(this SqlCommand cmd, IEnumerable<T> values, string paramNameRoot, int start = 1, string separator = ", ")
    {
        /* An array cannot be simply added as a parameter to a SqlCommand so we need to loop through things and add it manually. 
         * Each item in the array will end up being it's own SqlParameter so the return value for this must be used as part of the
         * IN statement in the CommandText.
         */
        var parameters = new List<SqlParameter>();
        var parameterNames = new List<string>();
        var paramNbr = start;
        foreach(var value in values)
        {
            var paramName = string.Format("@{0}{1}", paramNameRoot, paramNbr++);
            parameterNames.Add(paramName);
            parameters.Add(cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue(paramName, value));
        }

        cmd.CommandText = cmd.CommandText.Replace("{" + paramNameRoot + "}", string.Join(separator, parameterNames));

        return parameters.ToArray();
    }
}

It is called like this...

var cmd = new SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM TableA WHERE Age IN ({Age})");
cmd.AddArrayParameters(new int[] { 1, 2, 3 }, "Age");

Notice the "{Age}" in the sql statement is the same as the parameter name we are sending to AddArrayParameters. AddArrayParameters will replace the value with the correct parameters.

share|improve this answer
1  
Does this method have the security issue, like sql injection? – Yongwei Xing Mar 4 '10 at 8:02
2  
Because you are putting the values into parameters there is no risk of sql injection. – Brian Mar 4 '10 at 17:29
    
This is what I was looking for but I had a question. If the OP had several of the same columns to add to the SQL, how would we do this? Example. SELECT * FROM TableA WHERE Age = ({0}) OR Age = ({1}). (how would we do it with the cmd.Parameters) – Cocoa Dev Jan 29 '13 at 15:11
    
My answer is for adding the values of an array as parameters to your sql statement. Based on your sql, you just need regular, named parameters. "SELECT * FROM TableA WHERE Age = @Age1 OR Age = @Age2" – Brian Jan 29 '13 at 23:04
1  
@T2Tom, Whoops. I fixed it. Thanks. – Brian Jul 11 '15 at 1:31

I wanted to expand on the answer that Brian contributed to make this easily usable in other places.

/// <summary>
/// This will add an array of parameters to a SqlCommand. This is used for an IN statement.
/// Use the returned value for the IN part of your SQL call. (i.e. SELECT * FROM table WHERE field IN (returnValue))
/// </summary>
/// <param name="sqlCommand">The SqlCommand object to add parameters to.</param>
/// <param name="array">The array of strings that need to be added as parameters.</param>
/// <param name="paramName">What the parameter should be named.</param>
protected string AddArrayParameters(SqlCommand sqlCommand, string[] array, string paramName)
{
    /* An array cannot be simply added as a parameter to a SqlCommand so we need to loop through things and add it manually. 
     * Each item in the array will end up being it's own SqlParameter so the return value for this must be used as part of the
     * IN statement in the CommandText.
     */
    var parameters = new string[array.Length];
    for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
    {
        parameters[i] = string.Format("@{0}{1}", paramName, i);
        sqlCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue(parameters[i], array[i]);
    }

    return string.Join(", ", parameters);
}

You can use this new function as follows:

SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand();

string ageParameters = AddArrayParameters(cmd, agesArray, "Age");
sql = string.Format("SELECT * FROM TableA WHERE Age IN ({0})", ageParameters);

cmd.CommandText = sql;


Edit: Here is a generic variation that works with an array of values of any type and is usable as an extension method:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static void AddArrayParameters<T>(this SqlCommand cmd, string name, IEnumerable<T> values) 
    { 
        name = name.StartsWith("@") ? name : "@" + name;
        var names = string.Join(", ", values.Select((value, i) => { 
            var paramName = name + i; 
            cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue(paramName, value); 
            return paramName; 
        })); 
        cmd.CommandText = cmd.CommandText.Replace(name, names); 
    }
}

You can then use this extension method as follows:

var ageList = new List<int> { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 };
var cmd = new SqlCommand();
cmd.CommandText = "SELECT * FROM MyTable WHERE Age IN (@Age)";    
cmd.AddArrayParameters("Age", ageList);

Make sure you set the CommandText before calling AddArrayParameters.

Also make sure your parameter name won't partially match anything else in your statement (i.e. @AgeOfChild)

share|improve this answer
1  
Here is a generic variation that works with array of values of any type and is usable as an extension method: public static void AddArrayParameters<T>( this SqlCommand cmd, string name, IEnumerable<T> values) { var names = string.Join(", ", values.Select((value, i) => { var paramName = name + i; cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue(paramName, value); return paramName; })); cmd.CommandText = cmd.CommandText.Replace(name, names); } – Adam Jan 13 '14 at 15:44

If you can use a tool like "dapper", this can be simply:

int[] ages = { 20, 21, 22 }; // could be any common list-like type
var rows = connection.Query<YourType>("SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN @ages",
          new { ages }).ToList();

Dapper will handle unwrapping this to individual parameters for you.

share|improve this answer

Use .AddWithValue(), So:

sqlComm.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Age", sb.ToString().TrimEnd(','));

Alternatively, you could use this:

sqlComm.Parameters.Add(
    new SqlParameter("@Age", sb.ToString().TrimEnd(',')) { SqlDbType = SqlDbType. NVarChar }
    );

Your total code sample will look at follows then:

string sqlCommand = "SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN (@Age)";
SqlConnection sqlCon = new SqlConnection(connectString);
SqlCommand sqlComm = new SqlCommand();
sqlComm.Connection = sqlCon;
sqlComm.CommandType = System.Data.CommandType.Text;
sqlComm.CommandText = sqlCommand;
sqlComm.CommandTimeout = 300;

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
foreach (ListItem item in ddlAge.Items)
{
     if (item.Selected)
     {
         sb.Append(item.Text + ",");
     }
}

sqlComm.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Age", sb.ToString().TrimEnd(','));

// OR

// sqlComm.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@Age", sb.ToString().TrimEnd(',')) { SqlDbType = SqlDbType. NVarChar });
share|improve this answer
    
I have tried this one, does not work. – Yongwei Xing Mar 4 '10 at 7:39
    
The Age field's type is nvchar not int. Does it matter? – Yongwei Xing Mar 4 '10 at 7:45
    
It shouldn't. Especially with the second method. You specify the type explicitly. – Kyle Rozendo Mar 4 '10 at 7:54
    
I use both method, it still doesn't work. I do not want to manipulate the string which may led security problem – Yongwei Xing Mar 4 '10 at 8:00
    
I'm not really understanding you. When you say it doesn't work, does it throw an exception? What does it do? – Kyle Rozendo Mar 4 '10 at 8:01

try it like this

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); 
foreach (ListItem item in ddlAge.Items) 
{ 
     if (item.Selected) 
     { 
          string sqlCommand = "SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN (@Age)"; 
          SqlConnection sqlCon = new SqlConnection(connectString); 
          SqlCommand sqlComm = new SqlCommand(); 
          sqlComm.Connection = sqlCon; 
          sqlComm.CommandType = System.Data.CommandType.Text; 
          sqlComm.CommandText = sqlCommand; 
          sqlComm.CommandTimeout = 300; 
          sqlComm.Parameters.Add("@Age", SqlDbType.NVarChar);
          sb.Append(item.Text + ","); 
          sqlComm.Parameters["@Age"].Value = sb.ToString().TrimEnd(',');
     } 
} 
share|improve this answer
1  
Why put the SqlConnection and SqlCommnad in the loop? – Yongwei Xing Mar 4 '10 at 7:40

sorry how do you add code?

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); foreach (ListItem item in ddlAge.Items) 
{ 
if (item.Selected) 
{ 
string sqlCommand = "SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN (@Age)";
 SqlConnection sqlCon = new SqlConnection(connectString); 
SqlCommand sqlComm = new SqlCommand(); 
sqlComm.Connection = sqlCon; sqlComm.CommandType = System.Data.CommandType.Text; sqlComm.CommandText = sqlCommand; 
sqlComm.CommandTimeout = 300; 
sqlComm.Parameters.Add("@Age", SqlDbType.NVarChar); 
sb.Append(item.Text + ","); sqlComm.Parameters["@Age"].Value = sb.ToString().TrimEnd(','); 
} 
}
share|improve this answer
    
it does not work also – Yongwei Xing Mar 4 '10 at 7:49

try

sqlComm.Parameters["@Age"].Value = sb.ToString().Replace(","," ");
share|improve this answer

Since there is a method on

SqlCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue(parameterName, value)

it might be more convenient to create a method accepting a parameter (name) to replace and a list of values. It is not on the Parameters level (like AddWithValue) but on command itself so it's better to call it AddParametersWithValues and not just AddWithValues:

query:

SELECT * from TableA WHERE Age IN (@age)

usage:

sqlCommand.AddParametersWithValues("@age", 1, 2, 3);

the extension method:

public static class SqlCommandExtensions
{
    public static void AddParametersWithValues<T>(this SqlCommand cmd,  string parameterName, params T[] values)
    {
        var parameterNames = new List<string>();
        for(int i = 0; i < values.Count(); i++)
        {
            var paramName = @"@param" + i;
            cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue(paramName, values.ElementAt(i));
            parameterNames.Add(paramName);
        }

        cmd.CommandText = cmd.CommandText.Replace(parameterName, string.Join(",", parameterNames));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you are using MS SQL Server 2008 and above you can use table-valued parameters like described here http://www.sommarskog.se/arrays-in-sql-2008.html.

1. Create a table type for each parameter type you will be using

The following command creates a table type for integers:

create type int32_id_list as table (id int not null primary key)

2. Implement helper methods

public static SqlCommand AddParameter<T>(this SqlCommand command, string name, IEnumerable<T> ids)
{
  var parameter = command.CreateParameter();      

  parameter.ParameterName = name;
  parameter.TypeName = typeof(T).Name.ToLowerInvariant() + "_id_list";
  parameter.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.Structured;
  parameter.Direction = ParameterDirection.Input;

  parameter.Value = CreateIdList(ids);

  command.Parameters.Add(parameter);
  return command;
}

private static DataTable CreateIdList<T>(IEnumerable<T> ids)
{
  var table = new DataTable();
  table.Columns.Add("id", typeof (T));

  foreach (var id in ids)
  {
    table.Rows.Add(id);
  }

  return table;
}

3. Use it like this

cmd.CommandText = "select * from TableA where Age in (select id from @age)"; 
cmd.AddParameter("@age", new [] {1,2,3,4,5});
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