Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to make a database that is highly localized. For almost all entities I need a translation to 5+ languages. Some entities even require and additional resource localized (like images which I enter as paths).

The question now is:

1: LOOKUP TABLE PER ENTITY/TABLE (kinda bloated schema?)

should I create a "Localized" localization lookup table for each table I need localized values (and use standard int/bigint PKs for elements) Like here:

MYITEMS
-------
 - MyItemId BIGINT PK
 - MyItemPrice DECIMAL

MYITEMLOCALIZED
---------------
 - CPK_MyItemId BIGINT FK
 - CPK_LanguageCode NCHAR
 - LocalizedName NVARCHAR
 - LocalizedResourcePath NVARCHAR

CUSTOMERS
---------
 - CustomerId BIGINT PK
 - CustomerName NVARCHAR

CUSTOMERLOCALIZED
---------------
 - CPK_CustomerId BIGINT FK
 - CPK_LanguageCode NCHAR
 - LocalizedName NVARCHAR
 - LocalizedResourcePath NVARCHAR

or

2: GUIDS WITH SINGLE LOOKUP LOCALIZATION TABLE (heavy guid usage?)

should I use GUIDs as PKs and then just use a single name and a single resource localization table.

MYITEMS
-------
 - MyItemId uniqueidentifier PK
 - MyItemPrice DECIMAL    

CUSTOMERS
---------
 - CustomerId uniqueidentifier PK
 - CustomerName NVARCHAR

LOCALIZED
    ---------------
     - CPK_ElementGuid uniqueidentifier FK
     - CPK_LanguageCode NCHAR
     - LocalizedValue NVARCHAR
     - LocalizedResourcePath NVARCHAR

3: SINGLE LOOKUP BUT GUIDS ONLY FOR LOCALIZATION (best of 2 worlds?)

should I use normal int/bigint PKs and then add a GUID column for each column I need localized and store localized values into a single localization lookup table.

MYITEMS
-------
 - MyItemId BIGINT PK
 - MyItemPrice DECIMAL
 - ItemNameLocalizationGuid uniqueidentifier(GUID)
 - ItemPictureLocalizationGuid uniqueidentifier(GUID)


CUSTOMERS
---------
 - CustomerId BIGINT PK
 - CustomerName NVARCHAR
 - CustomeerNameLocalizationGuid uniqueidentifier(GUID)

LOCALIZED
---------------
 - CPK_ElementGuid uniqueidentifier FK
 - CPK_LanguageCode NCHAR
 - LocalizedValue NVARCHAR

4: LOOKUP TABLE THAT RETURNS LOCALIZATION ID (go back and forth?)

should I create tables with no guids, but store localization id in the mother-table?

Like here:

MYITEMS
-------
 - MyItemId BIGINT PK
 - MyItemPrice DECIMAL
 - MyItemNameLocalizedId BIGINT    

CUSTOMERS
---------
 - CustomerId BIGINT PK
 - CustomerName NVARCHAR
 - CustomerGenderLocalizedId BIGINT

LOCALIZED
---------------
 - LocalizationId BIGINT PK
 - CustomerId BIGINT FK
 - LanguageCode NCHAR
 - LocalizedName NVARCHAR
 - LocalizedResourcePath NVARCHAR

If I use GUIDs as PKs I've read I'll suffer huge performance and data size penalty, but I will also instantly deal with element uniqueness across servers, dbs...

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

First of all, I'd strongly recommend using an existing standard for the localization identifiers - don't re-invent yet another system! Use the ISO-639 standard codes for language, e.g. "en" for English, "fr" for French etc.

See Wikipedia for a list of all the defined codes.

Secondly, in my experience and my judgment, I would use a language table per entity.

We typically have some "system name" on the main table, e.g. the English text, and then we have a table "(entity)_TX" for the textual representation in various languages.

Something like this:

  TABLE CustomerType
      CustomerTypeID    INT IDENTITY(1,1) PK
      CustomerTypeName  VARCHAR(100)    -- English "system" name, e.g. "Gold customer"

  TABLE CustomerType_TX
      CustomerTypeID    INT
      LanguageID        CHAR(2)   -- ISO-639 codes
      CustomerTypeText  VARCHAR(200)   -- translated texts

To me, this is clearer and more explicit and more "intuitive" than having a single, GUID-based encoding scheme.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for using the standard codes. –  devstuff Mar 4 '10 at 8:21
    
That is my option #1 actually. Well, standard codes like en-gb and en-us are a bit over char(2) so I'll have to widen that a bit in this case :) –  BuzzBubba Mar 4 '10 at 8:28
    
please keep in mind that GUIDs are not guaranteed to be unique either...granted there is a high improbability that you will ever see a duplicate but still... –  espais Mar 4 '10 at 10:18
    
@BuzzBubba: yes, if you need to distinguish the regionalized languages like "en-GB" vs. "en-US" vs. "en-CA", then yes, you need some more characters. But still - I'd use the standard codes, if ever possible - no need to invent yet another set of constants for something that's really already been solved :-) –  marc_s Mar 4 '10 at 11:40
    
Wouldn't CustomerType_TX.CustomerTypeText need to be nvarchar? –  Thomas Mar 5 '10 at 3:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.