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#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class X{
    private:
        char ime[50];
    X(char *c){ // or char (char c[]) which one to use?
        // how to set the value of c inside the ime[50];
    }
};

int main()
{

    return 0;
}

I want to pass a char as a function argument inside the constructor of a Class, so I can use two ways.. which one do I use? And once the value is passed, how do I put the value of c inside the char ime[50] variable of the class?

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6  
Use an std::string instead. Otherwise you will have to worry about the length of the thing being passed. –  juanchopanza May 21 '14 at 6:29
    
... or use std::vector<char> - depends what you need. –  BЈовић May 21 '14 at 6:31
    
@juanchopanza It's for an exercise which specifies that I should use a char, with a specified maximum length. –  user3659335 May 21 '14 at 6:32
    
OK, then you have to ensure you do not copy more then 50 characters, bearing in mind that character strings "a.k.a. c-strings" are nul terminated, i.e. their end is marked by a '\0' character. Whether your function parameter is char* or char[] is cosmetic. –  juanchopanza May 21 '14 at 6:45
    
Why are you adding "using namespace std"? it's a bad habit. –  chook May 21 '14 at 6:46

3 Answers 3

As the comment suggested, the easiest way to use std::string. Also, if your constructor is not public nobody can call it.

class X{
    private:
        std::string ime;
    public:
        X(const std::string& str) : ime(str) {
        }
};

If you insist on using char* though, and you are sure that you will only ever pass in a character array of length 50, you can use memcpy.

class X{
    private:
        char ime[50];
    public:
        X(const char* c) {
            memcpy(ime,c,50);
        }
};

If you insist on char* and you do not know how long the length is (only that it is less than 50), you will have to pass in the length.

class X{
    private:
        char ime[50];
    public:
        X(const char* c, int length) {
            if (length > 50) length = 50;
            memcpy(ime,c,length);
        }
};

Note that we use memcpy instead of strncpy because I am making no assumptions about what is inside your char[].

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+1 for spotting private constructor –  Apokal May 21 '14 at 6:38
    
@merlin2011 why isn't "str" const ref? –  chook May 21 '14 at 6:40
    
@hellfire769, Correcting. Too hasty. :) –  merlin2011 May 21 '14 at 6:43
    
Why can't I call the object for example X x("hfsfasdasfsdsa"), it says that (char*) is private? –  user3659335 May 21 '14 at 6:45
    
@user3659335, That's strange. Let me check. –  merlin2011 May 21 '14 at 6:46

Both are the same, use C string copy routines to copy the data into the internal buffer.

pay close attention to the length of the string passed in, and copy only the first 50 characters.

But indeed, using std (string or vector, basic_str) is much more simple/safe to use

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There are a few things that you have to take into consideration:

  1. As others (merlin2011, juanchopanza) suggested above, if the argument is a null-terminated string, you are better off using std::string, and then using a copy routine such as std::copy to fill the data member array.

  2. You should pass the argument as const, as it is not being modified within the constructor's body (that is).

  3. If you are passing an array of char values (rather than a null-terminated string), you should pass the array's size as another argument to the constructor. Then, inside the constructor's body, use a copy routine (such as std::copy) to copy the the required amount of char values (as specified by the additional argument) to the data member array.

  4. In this case, there is no difference between the char* or char[] notation, as they will both specify a char pointer parameter that is being passed to a function. For more info about the difference between these notations, see this thread.

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