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This is the code I have. Base class has member variable i and derived class also has same member variable name. Now client creates Base ptr pointing to derived and accesses member variable directly using i. I thought it would call derived member variable, instead it calls base class variable. I am not sure why this is?

#include<iostream>

using namespace std;

class A{
    public:
        int i;
        A(int ii=5):i(ii){}
        virtual void display(){
            cout<<" In A :"<<i<<endl;
        }
};


class B: public A{
    public:
       int i;
       B(int ii=7):i(ii){}
       void display(){
          cout<<" In B :"<<i<<endl;
       }
};


int main(){
   A * aptr = new B();
   cout << aptr->i <<endl; // expected B::i but gave A::i
   aptr->display();
   B bb;
   bb.display();
   return 0;
}

Is there a good reason for this. I thought like vptr is member variable of object(when new B was called) and this vptr calls correctly when we type aptr->display. Why isn't the same thing happening with i.

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3  
Member variables can not be "virtual" like member functions. –  Joachim Pileborg May 21 at 6:48
    
Member variables are not virtual methods. If you want to have i behave like a virtual method, wrap it in a getter/setter and make that virtual. –  iMoses May 21 at 6:48
    
no my point is , vptr becomes part of object member when class is instantiated eg. class A and class B will have separate vptr and vtable. when i create new B(), vptr of B is attached to it. So when i call ptr->display() vptr of B was picked up and not A hence B::display was properly called. similarly shouldnt be B::i be called when we type ptr->i . since we created instance of B and not A –  rocky_mfe May 21 at 6:54
    
variable members are not linked to the vtable, so when you call aptr->i you are calling i from the base class A. On the other hand, when you invoke aptr->Display(), Display is a virtual function, so B::Display() will be called, which will display i from the B class, because that i is in effect hiding the i from the base class A (remember that the B object was created in the A * aptr = new B(); statement, with its own i variable instantiated by the constructor to 7). To refer to the i part of the base A, you have to specify it as A::i. –  vsoftco May 21 at 7:04

2 Answers 2

Member variables in C++ are not shadowed by inheritance the way virtual functions are.

If B inherits from A, and they both define a member named i, both of those variables exist and are independently part of the object.

Since your pointer has the type A*, the expression aptr->i will resolve to A's version of i.


As a side note, B can also explicitly access A's version of i, as long as it is not private.

class B: public A{
    public:
       int i;
       B(int ii=7):i(ii){}
       void display(){
          cout<<" In B :"<<i<<endl;
          cout<<" In A :"<<A::i<<endl;
       }
};
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sorry , but not impressed with answer. I think i knew this stuff. question is why aptr->i called A::i and while if put in code B* bptr = dynamic_cast<B*>aptr; then call bptr->i will call B::i. –  rocky_mfe May 21 at 7:50
    
@rocky_mfe, The question of why polymorphism excludes variables in c++ is one that you will have to ask the language creators. I didn't design c++ so I can only tell you how it works not why. –  merlin2011 May 21 at 8:07

This is what I wanted to ask and luckily was able to write in main func the stuff i needed. Please check and let me know why A& and A instance behave differntly.

int main(){
    A * aptr = new B();
    cout << aptr->i <<endl;
    aptr->display();

    B *bptr = dynamic_cast<B*>(aptr);
    bptr->display();
    cout << bptr->i <<"\t" <<bptr->A::i<<endl;

    A & aref = static_cast<A&>(*aptr);
    cout <<endl <<"Called ref : "<<aref.i<<endl;
    aref.display(); // here it calls B::display

    A aa(*aptr);
    cout <<endl <<"Called Inst : "<<aa.i<<endl;
    aa.display(); // here it calls A::display

    delete aptr;
    return 0;
}

Question is why aref and aa behave differently? My understanding is when instance of B was created using new B(). there were 2 variables in it, "i" and vptr of class B.

When aref is created, it called vptr of B for display, but aa calls A::display, While for both cases slicing is happening then how does it behave differently.

I am asking question in terms of memory is allocated to any class instance and when ptr of base is pointing to derived class. Hope you understand my confusion.

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