Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a local that's only used for the purposes of checking the result from another function and passing it on if it meets certain criteria. Most of the time, that criteria will never be met. Is there any way I can avoid this "extra" local?

I only have about 1MB of storage for my binary, and I have several thousand function calls that follow this pattern. I know it's a minor thing, but if there's a better pattern I'd love to know!

SomeDataType myclass::myFunction()
{
   SomeDataType result;  // do I really need this local???

   // i need to check the result and pass it on if it meets a certain condition
   result = doSomething();
   if ( ! result ) {
      return result;
   }

   // do other things here
   ...

   // normal result of processing
   return SomeDataType(whatever);
}
share|improve this question
1  
Clarification: I'm not worried about RAM usage so much as I'm worried about flash memory consumption with the size of my executable. I'm sure it will fit in a register, but the extra local will increase the size of my obj files. –  Lisa Mar 4 '10 at 9:20
3  
The first question to me would be, do you really need seperate default-construction followed by assignment? What's wrong with SomeDataType result = doSomething(); ? That will probably save more flash, by eliminating SomeDataType::SomeDataType() call. –  MSalters Mar 4 '10 at 9:45
    
You're probably right on that, I don't need the default construction. –  Lisa Mar 4 '10 at 9:58
1  
"the extra local will increase the size of my obj files" - I'm not sure I follow. How will the extra local increase the obj file size? It's data that resides in RAM (or in a register). –  Michael Burr Mar 8 '10 at 8:41

10 Answers 10

I would suggest you don't worry about it. It's not really a good use of time to optimize down at this level, since any decent compiler will minimize the amount of the local storage required. The stack is reusable, thousands of calls won't matter because the memory is only required for the context where it is used and will not be relevant beyond that.

If it is really necessary for you to be concerned about a few bytes of temporary storage on the stack, you should probably be working in assembly. I doubt this is the case, so don't sweat it and spend your time on other more interesting and important issues!

share|improve this answer

In your call to doSomething(), instead of returning null, you could return SomeDataType(whatever).

share|improve this answer

I'd suggest that you check your compiler options and make sure that they are set to "optimize for size" since that is what you're worried about. And if your compiler doesn't have something like this as a setting, then perhaps it's time to check out a different one.

share|improve this answer

I would disassemble the code and figure out what your compiler is doing when it generates the code. Modern compilers do some tricky stuff, and trying to guess how to save code space is not obvious - sometimes I see very little correspondence from the source to the assembly. Source code is more about clarity and maintenance - generating the assembly has different metrics.

share|improve this answer

If you have a pattern that repeats in thousands of functions, you could consider replacing it with one function and a look-up table.

(I can't really be more specific without knowing more details about your situation.)

share|improve this answer

If you're not using the result variable elsewhere in the function you could try this:

if (!doSomething())
{
    return;
}

The above example allows the compiler to create temporary variables if necessary, rather that you telling the compiler to create one.

If you are a stickler for structured programming, you could try this:

do
{
    if (!doSomething())
    {
        break;
    }
// ...
} while (false);
return;

This example allows for only one return point in a function. Which may be a good thing when dealing with quality and traceability guidelines.

share|improve this answer

What if change function to

void myclass::myFunction(SomeDataType* pResult)
{
  // i need to check the result and pass it on if it meets a certain condition
   *pResult = doSomething();
   if ( ! *pResult ) {
      return;
   }

   // do other things here
   ...

   // normal result of processing
  *pResult = SomeDataType(whatever);
}
share|improve this answer
    
A modern compiler can already do this. Look up RVO. –  MSalters Mar 4 '10 at 9:42
    
Hmm. Perhaps the right direction, but I'm not sure. I just tried a quick compiler test, and adding the extra parameter to the function call seemed to consume the exact same amount of space as the local, but I'm not sure that's right as I may not have hit the minimum exe size with such a small test. –  Lisa Mar 4 '10 at 9:43
    
don't forget about operation occurs when returning an object from function, it actually including creation of temporary object, return value is assigned to abject, than if you assing result of function to variable assgn operator is performed, if you are not assigning, but use somthing like myFunction().doSomething() there will be no assignment, but typical usage in most cases is var = myFunction() –  drlazy Mar 4 '10 at 9:55
    
RVO: Good call, but there's a lot of caveats with that to depend on it with certainty. Good article I just found on Dr. Dobbs on the topic: drdobbs.com/cpp/184403855 Aaargh. I'm really trying to avoid two versions of the executable just to find which is better, but I guess I really should know better and just check the output eh? Ce'est la vie. –  Lisa Mar 4 '10 at 10:02

Depends if your compiler has return value opitmization or not, and if Somedatatype is big or small. The safe side is using smart pointers for this kind of patterns if objects are big. If they are POD, they might be optimized and returned on registers.

share|improve this answer

How complex is SomeDataType? Does it have a lot of members? Does it do a lot of work in a constructor? If so, then I'd avoid this. If not, you may find the compiler will generate good code for this. For example, the compiler will probably do pretty well with integer types.

With a question like this, the answer is almost always: consult the compiler's assembly output.

share|improve this answer
    
In my case SomeDataType is a very simple concrete (non-virtual) class with a single integer member variable and about a dozen member functions. The constructor performs an assignment only. I know with a fair amount of certainty its cheaper to create it as a return value on the stack than as a local whenever I can. However, I'd really like a general solution if one exists as I can't guarantee SomeDataType will always be that. –  Lisa Mar 4 '10 at 9:13
1  
Well, I for one don't think there is a good general solution for this. In fact problems like this one makes my C++ very very "C like" when I code for platforms with tight memory-constraints. –  S.C. Madsen Mar 4 '10 at 9:19
    
I agree, you should take a look at the assembly that your compiler generates. If this variable can fit in a register, any good embedded compiler should have optimized it away for you. –  bta Mar 12 '10 at 20:13

As asveikau pointed out, if SomeDataType will "fit in a register" (i.g. its a plain old int), then your local will (depending on the platform) not waste any memory. And I concur with asveikau that you should consult the assembly output to evaluate if this is the case.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.