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I am quite a n00b in Cassandra (I'm mainly from an RDBMS background with some NoSQL here and there, like Google's BigTable and MongoDB) and I'm struggling with the data modelling for the use cases I'm trying to satisfy. I looked at this and this and even this but they're not exactly what I needed.

I have this basic table:

CREATE TABLE documents (
    itemid_version text,       
    xml_payload text,
    insert_time timestamp,
    PRIMARY KEY (itemid_version)
); 

itemid is actually a UUID (and unique for all documents), and version is an int (version 0 is the "first" version). xml_payload is the full XML doc, and can get quite big. Yes, I'm essentially creating a versioned document store.

As you can see, I concatenated the two to create a primary key and I'll get to why I did this later as I explain the requirements and/or use cases:

  1. user needs to get the single (1) doc he wants, he knows the item id and version (not necessarily the latest)
  2. user needs to get the single (1) doc he wants, he knows the item id but does not know the latest version
  3. user needs the version history of a single (1) doc.
  4. user needs to get the list (1 or more) of docs he wants, he knows the item id AND version (not necessarily the latest)

I will be writing the client code that will perform the use cases, please excuse the syntax as I'm trying to be language-agnostic

first one's straightforward:

$itemid_version = concat($itemid, $version)
$doc = csql("select * from documents where itemid_version = {0};" 
    -f $itemid_version)

now to satisfy the 2nd and 3rd use cases, I am adding the following table:

CREATE TABLE document_versions (
    itemid uuid,
    version int,
    PRIMARY KEY (itemid, version)
) WITH clustering order by (version DESC);

new records will be added as new docs and new versions of existing docs are created

now we have this (use case #2):

$latest_itemid, $latest_version = csql("select itemid, 
    version from document_versions where item_id = {0} 
    order by version DESC limit 1;" -f $itemid)
$itemid_version = concat($latest_itemid, $latest_version)
$doc = csql("select * from documents where itemid_version = {0};" 
    -f $itemid_version)

and this (use case #3):

$versions = csql("select version from document_versions where item_id = {0}" 
    -f $itemid)

for the 3rd requirement, I am adding yet another table:

CREATE TABLE latest_documents (
    itemid uuid,
    version int,
    PRIMARY KEY (itemid, version)
)

records are inserted for new docs, records are updated for existing docs

and now we have this:

$latest_itemids, $latest_versions = csql("select itemid, version 
    from latest_documents where item_id in ({0})" -f $itemid_list.toCSV())

foreach ($one_itemid in $latest_itemids, $one_version in $latest_versions)
    $itemid_version = concat($latest_itemid, $latest_version)
    $latest_docs.append(
        cql("select * from documents where itemid_version = {0};" 
        -f $itemid_version))        

Now I hope it's clear why I concatenated itemid and version to create an index for documents as opposed to creating a compound key: I cannot have OR in the WHERE clause in SELECT

You can assume that only one process will do the inserts/updates so you don't need to worry about consistency or isolation issues.

Am I on the right track here? there are quite a number of things that doesn't sit well with me...but mainly because I don't understand Cassandra yet:

  • I feel that the primary key for documents should be a composite of (itemid, version) but I can't satisfy use case #4 (return a list from a query)...I can't possibly use a separate SELECT statement for each document due to the performance hit (network overhead)...or can (should) I?
  • 2 trips to get a document if the version is not known beforehand. probably a compromise I have to live with, or maybe there's a better way.
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How would this work Dexter?

It is actually very similar to your solution actually except you can store all versions and be able to fetch the 'latest' version just from one table (document_versions).

In most cases I think you can get what you want in a single SELECT except use case #2 where fetching the most recent version of a document where a pre SELECT is needed on document_versions first.

SECOND ATTEMPT

(I removed the code from the first attempt, apologies to anyone who was following in the comments).

CREATE TABLE documents (
        itemid_version text,
        xml_payload text,
        insert_time timestamp,
        PRIMARY KEY (itemid_version)
);

CREATE TABLE document_versions (
        itemid text,
        version int,
        PRIMARY KEY (itemid, version)
) WITH CLUSTERING ORDER BY (version DESC);


INSERT INTO documents (itemid_version, xml_payload, insert_time) VALUES ('doc1-1', '<?xml>1st</xml>', '2014-05-21 18:00:00');
INSERT INTO documents (itemid_version, xml_payload, insert_time) VALUES ('doc1-2', '<?xml>2nd</xml>', '2014-05-21 18:00:00');
INSERT INTO documents (itemid_version, xml_payload, insert_time) VALUES ('doc2-1', '<?xml>1st</xml>', '2014-05-21 18:00:00');
INSERT INTO documents (itemid_version, xml_payload, insert_time) VALUES ('doc2-2', '<?xml>2nd</xml>', '2014-05-21 18:00:00');

INSERT INTO document_versions (itemid, version) VALUES ('doc1', 1);
INSERT INTO document_versions (itemid, version) VALUES ('doc1', 2);
INSERT INTO document_versions (itemid, version) VALUES ('doc2', 1);
INSERT INTO document_versions (itemid, version) VALUES ('doc2', 2);
  1. user needs to get the single (1) doc he wants, he knows the item id and version (not necessarily the latest)

    SELECT * FROM documents WHERE itemid_version = 'doc1-2';

  2. user needs to get the single (1) doc he wants, he knows the item id but does not know the latest version (You would feed concatenated itemid + version in result of first query into second query)

    SELECT * FROM document_versions WHERE itemid = 'doc2' LIMIT 1;

    SELECT * FROM documents WHERE itemid_version = 'doc2-2';

  3. user needs the version history of a single (1) doc.

    SELECT * FROM document_versions WHERE itemid = 'doc2';

  4. user needs to get the list (1 or more) of docs he wants, he knows the item id AND version (not necessarily the latest)

    SELECT * FROM documents WHERE itemid_version IN ('doc1-2', 'doc2-1');

Cheers,

share|improve this answer
    
thanks @reggoodwin...as for use case #4, i know it's the use case that throws a monkey wrench here as your solution would have worked for me if i didn't have that requirement. basically, for use case #4 it boils down to "entitlements"--i.e., some users are only entitled up to a certain version of a doc (again, specific users may not be entitled to the latest version). –  Dexter Legaspi May 21 at 16:24
    
actually, for this approach SELECT * FROM documents where itemid IN ('doc1', 'doc2'); returns ALL versions of the documents, not just the latest. –  Dexter Legaspi May 21 at 16:43
    
Dexter, thanks for flagging up problem with my use case #4 example. I had not tested that last query before adding some final INSERTs. I've now re-submitted a different code example that I hope works better. It is quite similar to your solution actually. –  reggoodwin May 21 at 18:23
    
thanks. looks like i'm on the right track. :-) –  Dexter Legaspi May 21 at 19:52

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