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i know that new android versions can require new permissions in order to perform certain actions by applications that didn't require permissions in previous releases. my question is what happens to existing applications? do they crush/get an exception when they try to perform the action that now needs a permission? does android automatically gives them the required permission? do they need to release a new version of the application and the user will be promoted to approve the new permission during installation.

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Some do. Some are granted implicit access for the next version or so if the target SDK that was built against does not have that permission.

Some crash though, depending on the severity of the new permission. I had one example on the tip of my tongue but I spaced it...

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how can android add new permission automatically? this hides the user the fact the application uses new permission. –  pulu May 21 at 17:18
    
You can't. You have to update the app. If you could add permissions on the fly that'd be a huge security risk. Android's new permissions are on new versions of android, and older versions ignore new ones, so if you add new ones that don't exist (like writing to the SD card), the old versions will ignore them (they'll still work as the permissions are only added in new OS releases, if your device isn't running that, then it will ignore it) –  Mgamerz May 21 at 17:19
    
sorry but i didn't follow, what happens if install a new version of android on my device that requires a new permission.what will happen to an application that can't function without this permission? –  pulu May 21 at 17:34
    
Depending on the new permission, one of two things will happen: 1) The app will just crash or have undefined behavior or 2) The app will be granted the permission implicitly for forwards-compatability. example stackoverflow.com/questions/12976822/… –  Mgamerz May 21 at 17:38

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