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Write a function: int countZeroSlices(int* arr); that returns number of slices in an array, which their sum is equal to 0. example: arr = {2, -2, 3, 0, 4, -7} slices that satisfy requirement are: (2,-2) (0), (3,4,-7), (2,-2,0,3,4,-7) so the function should return "4" slices.

Solution must be O(n.Log(n)), where n is size of array

My current code is:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
   vector<int> A{2,-2,0,3,4,-7};

   int sum=0;
   int count=0;
   for(size_t i=0; i<A.size(); i++)
   {
       sum += A[i];
       if(sum==0 || A[i] ==0) count++;
   }
   cout<<count;


   return 0;
}

_ output is 3 which is not the correct answer. Note that I am detecting all slices except the middle ones e.g: (3,4,-7)

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closed as unclear what you're asking by sashoalm, Raging Bull, sweetamylase, bodi0, Pinal May 22 '14 at 6:51

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
You can want O(n log n) all you want, but this is a version of the subset sum problem, in fact, it is harder since you want all subsets adding to zero. And that is NP-complete. [Oh, wait, you are restricted to consecutive entries. Hmmm.] –  Andrew Lazarus May 21 '14 at 17:22
    
Since your solution returns a wrong answer, it is not inefficient, it is incorrect. As far as the efficiency goes, your solution is O(N) - an impossibly fast for this problem (which helps explaining why it is incorrect). –  dasblinkenlight May 21 '14 at 17:22
2  
@AndrewLazarus It's not a subset sum - he wants only straight runs. –  dasblinkenlight May 21 '14 at 17:24
    
@dasblinkenlight I didn't state it was inefficient, but I know it is incorrect. –  AK_ May 21 '14 at 17:27
    
I mean this: "I have a solution but very inefficient." –  dasblinkenlight May 21 '14 at 17:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
   vector<int> A{2,-2,3,0,4,-7};
   map<int, int> partial_sums;
    partial_sums[0] = 1;
    int sum = 0;
    int count = 0;
    for (size_t i = 0; i < A.size(); i++) {
        sum += A[i];
        count += partial_sums[sum];
        partial_sums[sum]++;
    }
   cout << count;
   return 0;
}

Explanation: Every slice of the array is the difference between two partial sums. For example, 3 + 4 + (-7) = (2 + (-2) + 0 + 3 + 4 + (-7)) - (2 + (-2) + 0). To count the number of slices with sum zero ending at position i, notice that such a slice is the difference between the partial sum ending at position i, and some previous partial sum. The previous partial sum should have the same value, in order for the result to be zero. Using a std::map, we get O(n log n).

Edit: Fixed a bug. The initial entry in the map is necessary to account for the empty partial sum.

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I really loved your explanation but I still get wrong answer. Could you please go over your code and find what is wrong? –  AK_ May 21 '14 at 17:33
1  
@AK_: sorry, should be fixed now –  Brian May 21 '14 at 17:38
    
Could you explain partial_sums[0] = 1; –  AK_ May 21 '14 at 17:52
    
@AK_: I explained it in the edit. There is one empty partial sum, and its value is zero. –  Brian May 21 '14 at 17:54

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