Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

An exercise from CoffeeScript: Accelerated JavaScript Development asks "what's wrong with the following code?"

Genie = ->
  Genie::wishesLeft = 3
  Genie::grantWish = ->
    if @wishesLeft > 0
      console.log "wish granted!"
      --@wishesLeft

My understanding is that Genie::wishesLeft = 3 incorrectly assigns this property to the Genie prototype.

Here's what I think the re-factor should be:

Genie = (@wishesLeft)->
  @wishesLeft = 3
  ...

I say this since I would expect each Genie object to have its own wishesLeft property. However, the following code seems to behave normally:

genie1 = new Genie()
console.log genie1.grantWish(), "wishes left"
console.log genie1.grantWish(), "wishes left"
console.log genie1.grantWish(), "wishes left"

output

$coffee SpotTheBug.coffee
wish granted!
2 'wishes left'
wish granted!
1 'wishes left'
wish granted!
0 'wishes left'

What's the problem with the above code? How's my re-factor?

share|improve this question
2  
Never assign to the prototype inside the constructor. –  Bergi May 21 at 20:26
    
why do you say that? –  Kevin Meredith May 24 at 2:29
    
One problem is that modifying the prototype can effectively modify all instances. –  mu is too short May 24 at 4:19
    
@KevinMeredith: Because instantiating one object should not affect the other instances. There might be (questionable) exceptions (when prototype properties are used as "static" class attributes), but it's a good rule of thumb. –  Bergi May 24 at 15:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The real problem isn't how the prototype is used, the real problem is a combination of two things:

  1. The implicit return value from functions.
  2. The code is trying to hand-craft a class-function instead of letting CoffeeScript sort that out by using class.

If you have a look at the JavaScript-ified version of this:

Genie = ->
  Genie::wishesLeft = 3
  Genie::grantWish = ->
    if @wishesLeft > 0
      console.log "wish granted!"
      --@wishesLeft

then we'll see what's going wrong:

var Genie = function() {
  Genie.prototype.wishesLeft = 3;
  return Genie.prototype.grantWish = function() {
    if (this.wishesLeft > 0) {
      console.log("wish granted!");
      return --this.wishesLeft;
    }
  };
};

Notice the implicitly added return Genie.prototype.grantWish? That means that g = new Genie will actually leave the grantWish method in g and g.grantWish() will give you TypeError.

From the fine new operator manual:

When the code new foo(...) is executed, the following things happen:

  1. A new object is created, inheriting from foo.prototype.
  2. [...]
  3. The object returned by the constructor function becomes the result of the whole new expression. [...]

Note that 3 says about the constructor function's return value.

One solution is to manually specify the return value so that the implicit one doesn't screw up new's behavior:

Genie = ->
  Genie::wishesLeft = 3
  Genie::grantWish = ->
    if @wishesLeft > 0
      console.log "wish granted!"
      --@wishesLeft
  return # <---------------- Add this

Demo

A better solution would be write CoffeeScript rather than JavaScript when working in CoffeeScript. This would mean using class to deal with all this stuff for you:

class Genie
  wishesLeft: 3
  grantWish: ->
    if @wishesLeft > 0
      console.log "wish granted!"
      --@wishesLeft

Demo

share|improve this answer
    
in the first example, why am I seeing g() evaluate to undefined? I would've expected this.wishesLeft to equal 2 (3-1). Also, I'm curious why g.wishesLeft is undefined. –  Kevin Meredith May 24 at 13:10
    
Because g is not a Genie, it is just the grantWish function. Note what I said about the behavior of new and see what console.log(g) has to say. BTW, you can use CoffeeScript at jsfiddle.net by selecting CoffeeScript in the Languages panel in the sidebar. –  mu is too short May 24 at 16:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.