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How do you call function lol() from outside the $(document).ready() for example:

$(document).ready(function(){  
  function lol(){  
    alert('lol');  
  }  
});  

Tried:

$(document).ready(function(){
  lol();
});

And simply:

lol();

It must be called within an outside javascript like:

function dostuff(url){
  lol(); // call the function lol() thats inside the $(document).ready()
}
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5 Answers 5

Outside of the block that function is defined in, it is out of scope and you won't be able to call it.

There is however no need to define the function there. Why not simply:

function lol() {
  alert("lol");
}

$(function() {
  lol(); //works
});

function dostuff(url) {
  lol(); // also works
}

You could define the function globally like this:

$(function() {
  lol = function() {
     alert("lol");
  };
});
$(function() {
  lol();
});

That works but not recommended. If you're going to define something in the global namespace you should use the first method.

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1  
I think when trying to define global function from within the second example, to avoid ambiguity you could use this: window['lol'] = function() { /* body of the function */ };. –  Tadeck Feb 21 '12 at 6:07
    
api.jquery.com/ready –  Thilini Ishaka Nov 8 '12 at 2:08
    
verrrrrrrrrrrry goooooooooooooood this –  ashkufaraz Sep 22 at 5:37

Define the function on the window object to make it global from within another function scope:

$(document).ready(function(){  
  window.lol = function(){  
    alert('lol');  
  }  
});
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this simple solution works for me –  geo1701 Mar 28 '12 at 10:17
    
This is a GREAT solution, saved me hours! –  Oritm Sep 27 '12 at 20:01

Short version: you can't, it's out of scope. Define your method like this so it's available:

function lol(){ 
  alert('lol'); 
} 

$(function(){
  lol();
});
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You don't need and of that - If a function is defined outside of Document.Ready - but you want to call in it Document.Ready - this is how you do it - these answer led me in the wrong direction, don't type function again, just the name of the function.

      $(document).ready(function () {
     fnGetContent();
      });

Where fnGetContent is here:

       function fnGetContent(keyword) {
            var NewKeyword = keyword.tag;
            var type = keyword.type;
            $.ajax({ .......
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1  
This is answering the inverse of the actual question, but not downvoted as it's still somewhat helpful for those seeking it. –  Michael Nov 29 '12 at 17:44
    
I downvoted because it is doesn't answer the question –  bonez Jul 15 at 20:44

What about the case where Prototype is installed with jQuery and we have noconflicts set for jQuery?

jQuery(document).ready(function($){  
     window.lol = function(){  
          $.('#funnyThat').html("LOL");
     }  
});

Now we can call lol from anywhere but did we introduce a conflict with Prototype?

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