Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a X function, I am using pipes, to buffer(couple of printfs, which are printed in Y function called inside from X function) the stdout stream if one Fd and then after buffer is complete,close one pipe and other Fd and then use printf on it.

I want to be completely sure that buffer is empty, when next time this X function is called again to do the task. I tried couple of things which I found online:

  1. fflush
  2. ioctl, _flushlbf: looks like they aren't supported by gcc. Does g++ support it?
  3. fseek(stdin,EOF,SEEK_END);
  4. fpurge(ofp);

I call X() function, couple of times. The present code, I have written, works fine if next set of output is greater than previous set.

If next set of output is less the present set of output. Then next set have some extra garbage values, which gives me an indication , that buffer may have not flushed completely.

Because of certain reason, I have written entire code in C but using g++ compiler.

My code as follows:

void X(int pairs,char* expOut)
{
    char buf[256];
    int fds[2];
    char output[300];
    char input[50];

    /* opening pipes */
    pipe(fds);

    /* saving the the given stdout stream */
    int bak = dup(STDOUT_FILENO);

    /* associating Fds[1] pipe with stdout */
    int res=dup2(fds[1],STDOUT_FILENO);

    /* associating Fds[0] pipe with stdin */
    dup2(fds[0],STDIN_FILENO);
    assert(res!=-1);

    /* Call To function Y: function combParenthesis is a recursive function,
     which prints out some strings couple of time */
    combParenthesis(pairs) ;

    fflush(stdout);

    /* closing stdout FD stream */
    close(fds[1]);
    fflush(stdout);

    /* restoring the old stdout stream */
    dup2(bak, 1);
    close(bak);

    /* opening, stdin stream for reading */
    FILE *ofp = fdopen(fds[0], "r");

    char strs[30][30];
    for (int i=0;i<30;i++) {
        memset(strs[i], 0, 30);

    }

    int i=0;
    if (ofp)
    {
        int sz;
        if((pairs*2)+1 <= 1)
        {
            sz=5;
        }
        else
        {sz = (pairs*2)+1 ;}

        /* read the stream  line by line */
        while (fgets(buf,sz ,ofp)) {
            printf("\n next string %s", buf);

            i++;
        }

        if (ferror(ofp)) {
            printf("something went wrong in the input to printf");

        }

    }

    /* different ways to flush it out  */
    char c;
    while( (c = fgetc( ofp )) != EOF && c != '\n' );
    fseek(stdin,EOF,SEEK_END);
    fpurge(ofp);
    fclose(ofp);
    fflush(stdin);
    // _flushlbf();

    /* close the  fd associated with stdin */
    close(fds[0]);    
}
share|improve this question
    
Are extra garbage values at the end or at the beginning or buffer, and how do you read your input buffer ? –  Serge Ballesta May 22 at 5:40
    
Pipes do not know anything about record structures, etc. So the only way to cleanly empty a pipe is to read one char at a time, in a loop, until the return status from the read is EOF. –  user3629249 May 22 at 8:07
    
I tried char c; while( (c = fgetc( ofp )) != EOF && c != '\n' ); fseek(stdin,EOF,SEEK_END); To make sure the entire buffer is read,... character by character till the end of file –  user1036348 May 23 at 4:24
    
@SergeBallesta: by "read your input buffer" do u mean how am I inputting into buffer? / * Call To function Y: function combParenthesis is a recursive function, which prints out some strings couple of time */ combParenthesis(pairs) ; prints out many strings using printf(); this gets into the buffer. Also if the first time function Y prints more number of string as compared to next time, then only I face this issue. –  user1036348 May 23 at 4:29
    
@user1036348 no, I mean how do you get in your program the chars from your input buffet, how do you read fgets, getc... –  Serge Ballesta May 23 at 4:55

1 Answer 1

EDIT: a precision at the end on fflush positioning.

I managed to run your code simply using a combParenthesis of my own (first pass : medium strings, second : larger strings, third smaller). I never found garbage in output ... as soon as I have replaced your printf("\n next string %s", buf); by an output on stderr

       fprintf(stderr, "\n next string %s", buf);

I also got correct output by flushing stdout after stdin and ofp by a single fflush(stdout). IMHO the problem was :

  • you close the pipe so stdout is no longer copied to ofp or stdin
  • you write on stdout with printf("\n next string %s", buf) and stdout may be buffered
  • you flush streams that are allready clean
  • when you dup stdout on your next call, you may read what remained from last pass in stdout

Here are the main improvements that I found :

  • if your read output of combParenthesis with a pipe duping stdout, never write to stdout in any over place (or be sure to flush it)
  • you do an unnecessary dup2(fds[0],STDIN_FILENO); because you directly read on the other end of the pipe (which is better)
  • you never verify that sz = (pairs*2)+1 is smaller than sizeof(buf)

Edit : In fact, I have just realized that your code could work, even with intermixed printf elsewhere in the application, provided you flush stdout before copying it to fds[1].

So here is a fixed version of your X() function with clearly identified edits (but IMHO you should considered my other suggestions too) :

void X(int pairs,char* expOut)
{
    char buf[256];
    int fds[2];
    char output[300];
    char input[50];

    /* BEGIN EDIT */
    /* first flush stdout */
    fflush(stdout);
    /* END EDIT */

    /* opening pipes */
    pipe(fds);

    /* saving the the given stdout stream */
    int bak = dup(STDOUT_FILENO);

    /* associating Fds[1] pipe with stdout */
    int res=dup2(fds[1],STDOUT_FILENO);

    /* associating Fds[0] pipe with stdin */
    dup2(fds[0],STDIN_FILENO);
    assert(res!=-1);

    /* Call To function Y: function combParenthesis is a recursive function,
     which prints out some strings couple of time */
    combParenthesis(pairs) ;


    /* closing stdout FD stream */
    close(fds[1]);
    fflush(stdout);

    /* restoring the old stdout stream */
    dup2(bak, 1);
    close(bak);

    /* opening, stdin stream for reading */
    FILE *ofp = fdopen(fds[0], "r");

    char strs[30][30];
    for (int i=0;i<30;i++) {
        memset(strs[i], 0, 30);

    }

    int i=0;
    if (ofp)
    {
        int sz;
        if((pairs*2)+1 <= 1)
        {
            sz=5;
        }
        else
        {sz = (pairs*2)+1 ;}

        /* read the stream  line by line */
    // EDIT : changed sz with sizeof(buf)-1 - cause: no correct pairs value
        while (fgets(buf, sizeof(buf) - 1,ofp)) {
            printf("\n next string %s", buf);

            i++;
        }

        if (ferror(ofp)) {
            printf("something went wrong in the input to printf");

        }

    }

    /* different ways to flush it out  */
    /* BEGIN EDIT : ALL FLUSHING COMMENTED OUT 
    char c;
    while( (c = fgetc( ofp )) != EOF && c != '\n' );
    fseek(stdin,EOF,SEEK_END);
    fpurge(ofp);
    fclose(ofp);
    fflush(stdin);
    // _flushlbf();
    END EDIT */

    /* close the  fd associated with stdin */
    close(fds[0]);    
}

I never got garbage in what is read and it works even with output redirected to a file, but for a reason I couldn't explain, the order of the messages is not what I would expect. Hope it's not a concern for you

share|improve this answer
    
I need to process the string further and I can't use any other printing method other than printf. Above code, has some code eliminated, to keep the problem simple. I read on other threads, fprintf with stderr works. –  user1036348 May 29 at 5:19
    
To read stdout in printf, i need to close fds pipe first then only I can read it via printf. –  user1036348 May 29 at 5:43
    
In case you have to have other printf elsewhere in your application, I've just edited my answer with a simple solution. –  Serge Ballesta May 29 at 10:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.