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Background:

I'm working with 8 band multispectral satellite imagery and estimating water depth from reflectance values. Using statsmodels, I've come up with an OLS model that will predict depth for each pixel based on the 8 reflectance values of that pixel. In order to work easily with the OLS model, I've stuck all the pixel reflectance values into a pandas dataframe formated like the one in the example below; where each row represents a pixel and each column is a spectral band of the multispectral image.

Due to some pre-processing steps, all the on-shore pixels have been transformed to all zeros. I don't want to try and predict the 'depth' of those pixels so I want to restrict my OLS model predictions to the rows that are NOT all zero values.

I will need to reshape my results back to the row x col dimensions of the original image so I can't just drop the all zero rows.

Specific Question:

I've got a Pandas dataframe. Some rows contain all zeros. I would like to mask those rows for some calculations but I need to keep the rows. I can't figure out how to mask all the entries for rows that are all zero.

For example:

In [1]: import pandas as pd
In [2]: import numpy as np
        # my actual data has about 16 million rows so
        # I'll simulate some data for the example. 
In [3]: cols = ['band1','band2','band3','band4','band5','band6','band7','band8']
In [4]: rdf = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randint(0,10,80).reshape(10,8),columns=cols)
In [5]: zdf = pd.DataFrame(np.zeros( (3,8) ),columns=cols)
In [6]: df = pd.concat((rdf,zdf)).reset_index(drop=True)
In [7]: df
Out[7]: 
        band1  band2  band3  band4  band5  band6  band7  band8
    0       9      9      8      7      2      7      5      6
    1       7      7      5      6      3      0      9      8
    2       5      4      3      6      0      3      8      8
    3       6      4      5      0      5      7      4      5
    4       8      3      2      4      1      3      2      5
    5       9      7      6      3      8      7      8      4
    6       6      2      8      2      2      6      9      8
    7       9      4      0      2      7      6      4      8
    8       1      3      5      3      3      3      0      1
    9       4      2      9      7      3      5      5      0
    10      0      0      0      0      0      0      0      0
    11      0      0      0      0      0      0      0      0
    12      0      0      0      0      0      0      0      0

    [13 rows x 8 columns]

I know I can get just the rows I'm interested in by doing this:

In [8]: df[df.any(axis=1)==True]
Out[8]: 
       band1  band2  band3  band4  band5  band6  band7  band8
    0      9      9      8      7      2      7      5      6
    1      7      7      5      6      3      0      9      8
    2      5      4      3      6      0      3      8      8
    3      6      4      5      0      5      7      4      5
    4      8      3      2      4      1      3      2      5
    5      9      7      6      3      8      7      8      4
    6      6      2      8      2      2      6      9      8
    7      9      4      0      2      7      6      4      8
    8      1      3      5      3      3      3      0      1
    9      4      2      9      7      3      5      5      0

   [10 rows x 8 columns]

But I need to reshape the data again later so I'll need those rows to be in the right place. I've tried all sorts of things including df.where(df.any(axis=1)==True) but I can't find anything that works.

Fails:

  1. df.any(axis=1)==True gives me True for the rows I'm interested in and False for rows I'd like to mask but when I try df.where(df.any(axis=1)==True) I just get back the whole data frame complete with all the zeros. I want the whole data frame but with all the values in those zero rows masked so, as I understand it, they should show up as Nan, right?

  2. I tried getting the indexes of the rows with all zeros and masking by row:

    mskidxs = df[df.any(axis=1)==False].index
    df.mask(df.index.isin(mskidxs))
    

    That didn't work either that gave me:

    ValueError: Array conditional must be same shape as self
    

    The .index is just giving an Int64Index back. I need a boolean array the same dimensions as my data frame and I just can't figure out how to get one.

Thanks in advance for your help.

-Jared

share|improve this question
    
It is a little unclear what you are saying, when you create the mask it is just a mask, the other rows are not removed from the original df. So when you say you want to do some reshaping can you post some more code to show why this would fail –  EdChum May 22 '14 at 7:49
    
@EdChum, I've edited the question to provide more detail and background. Basically, I've been able to subset the data successfully but I haven't been able to mask it. I'm really just having a hard time generating a mask of the correct dimensions. I need to make a mask with the dimensions of the df using attributes of the rows rather than individual entries. –  jkibele May 23 '14 at 0:38

2 Answers 2

It is not clear to me why you cannot simply perform the calculations on only a subset of the rows:

np.average(df[1][:11])

to exclude the zero rows.

Or you can just make calculations on a slice and read the computed values back into the original dataframe:

dfs = df[:10]
dfs['1_deviation_from_mean'] = pd.Series([abs(np.average(dfs[1]) - val) for val in dfs[1]])
df['deviation_from_mean'] = dfs['1_deviation_from_mean']

Alternatively you could create a list of the index points you want to mask, and then make calculations using numpy masked arrays, created by uising the np.ma.masked_where() method and specifying to mask the values in the index positions:

row_for_mask = [row for row in df.index if all(df.loc[row] == 0)]
masked_array = np.ma.masked_where(df[1].index.isin(row_for_mask), df[1])
np.mean(masked_array)

The masked array looks like this:

Name: 1, dtype: float64(data =
0      5
1      0
2      0
3      4
4      4
5      4
6      3
7      1
8      0
9      9
10    --
11    --
12    --
Name: 1, dtype: object,
share|improve this answer
    
no reason to use numpy masked arrays directly; pandas has a where() –  Jeff May 22 '14 at 10:26
    
I edited the question and added some more information and background. Sorry the question wasn't clear enough before. –  jkibele May 23 '14 at 0:50
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The process of clarifying my question has lead me, in a roundabout way, to finding the answer. This question also helped point me in the right direction. Here's what I figured out:

import pandas as pd
# Set up my fake test data again. My actual data is described
# in the question.
cols = ['band1','band2','band3','band4','band5','band6','band7','band8']
rdf = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randint(0,10,80).reshape(10,8),columns=cols)
zdf = pd.DataFrame(np.zeros( (3,8) ),columns=cols)
df = pd.concat((zdf,rdf)).reset_index(drop=True)

# View the dataframe. (sorry about the alignment, I don't
# want to spend the time putting in all the spaces)
df

    band1   band2   band3   band4   band5   band6   band7   band8
0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
2   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
3   6   3   7   0   1   7   1   8
4   9   2   6   8   7   1   4   3
5   4   2   1   1   3   2   1   9
6   5   3   8   7   3   7   5   2
7   8   2   6   0   7   2   0   7
8   1   3   5   0   7   3   3   5
9   1   8   6   0   1   5   7   7
10  4   2   6   2   2   2   4   9
11  8   7   8   0   9   3   3   0
12  6   1   6   8   2   0   2   5

13 rows × 8 columns

# This is essentially the same as item #2 under Fails
# in my question. It gives me the indexes of the rows
# I want unmasked as True and those I want masked as
# False. However, the result is not the right shape to
# use as a mask.
df.apply( lambda row: any([i<>0 for i in row]),axis=1 )
0     False
1     False
2     False
3      True
4      True
5      True
6      True
7      True
8      True
9      True
10     True
11     True
12     True
dtype: bool

# This is what actually works. By setting broadcast to
# True, I get a result that's the right shape to use.
land_rows = df.apply( lambda row: any([i<>0 for i in row]),axis=1, 
                      broadcast=True )

land_rows

Out[92]:
    band1   band2   band3   band4   band5   band6   band7   band8
0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
1   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
2   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
3   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
4   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
5   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
6   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
7   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
8   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
9   1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
10  1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
11  1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1
12  1   1   1   1   1   1   1   1

13 rows × 8 columns

# This produces the result I was looking for:
df.where(land_rows)

Out[93]:
    band1   band2   band3   band4   band5   band6   band7   band8
0   NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN
1   NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN
2   NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN
3   6   3   7   0   1   7   1   8
4   9   2   6   8   7   1   4   3
5   4   2   1   1   3   2   1   9
6   5   3   8   7   3   7   5   2
7   8   2   6   0   7   2   0   7
8   1   3   5   0   7   3   3   5
9   1   8   6   0   1   5   7   7
10  4   2   6   2   2   2   4   9
11  8   7   8   0   9   3   3   0
12  6   1   6   8   2   0   2   5

13 rows × 8 columns

Thanks again to those who helped. Hopefully the solution I found will be of use to somebody at some point.

I found another way to do the same thing. There are more steps involved but, according to %timeit, it is about 9 times faster. Here it is:

def mask_all_zero_rows_numpy(df):
    """
    Take a dataframe, find all the rows that contain only zeros
    and mask them. Return a dataframe of the same shape with all
    Nan rows in place of the all zero rows.
    """
    no_data = -99
    arr = df.as_matrix().astype(int16)
    # make a row full of the 'no data' value
    replacement_row = np.array([no_data for x in range(arr.shape[1])], dtype=int16)
    # find out what rows are all zeros
    mask_rows = ~arr.any(axis=1)
    # replace those all zero rows with all 'no_data' rows
    arr[mask_rows] = replacement_row
    # create a masked array with the no_data value masked
    marr = np.ma.masked_where(arr==no_data,arr)
    # turn masked array into a data frame
    mdf = pd.DataFrame(marr,columns=df.columns)
    return mdf

The result of mask_all_zero_rows_numpy(df) should be the same as Out[93]: above.

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