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I need an actor to stop one of its children, so that I can possibly create a new actor with same name (UUID ?).

I've got an ActorSystem with one Actor child. And this child creates new actors with context.actorOf and context.watch. When I try to stop one of these using context.stop, I observe that its postStop method is called as expected, but no matter how long I wait (seconds... minutes...), it never sends back the Terminated message to its creator (and watching) actor.

I read this in the AKKA documentation:

Since stopping an actor is asynchronous, you cannot immediately reuse the name of the child you just stopped; this will result in an InvalidActorNameException. Instead, watch the terminating actor and create its replacement in response to the Terminated message which will eventually arrive.

I don't care waiting for normal termination, but I really need actors to eventually terminate when asked to. Am I missing something ? Should I create actors directly from the system instead of from an actor ?

EDIT:

Here is my code :

object MyApp extends App {
  def start() = {
    val system = ActorSystem("MySystem")
    val supervisor = system.actorOf(Supervisor.props(), name = "Supervisor")
  }

  override def main(args: Array[String]) {
    start()
  }
}

object Supervisor {
  def props(): Props = Props(new Supervisor())
}

case class Supervisor() extends Actor {
  private var actor: ActorRef = null

  start()

  def newActor(name: String): ActorRef = {
    try {
      actor = context.actorOf(MyActor.props(name), name)
      context.watch(actor)
    } catch {
      case iane: InvalidActorNameException =>
        println(name + " not terminated yet.")
      null
    }
  }

  def terminateActor() {
    if (actor != null) context.stop(actor)
    actor = null
  }

  def start() {
    while (true) {
      // do something
      terminateActor()
      newActor("new name possibly same name as a previously terminated one")
      Thread.sleep(5000)
    }
  }

  override def receive = {
    case Terminated(x) => println("Received termination confirmation: " + x)
    case _ => println("Unexpected message.")
  }

  override def postStop = {
    println("Supervisor called postStop().")
  }
}

object MyActor {
  def props(name: String): Props = Props(new MyActor(name))
}

case class MyActor(name: String) extends Actor {
  run()

  def run() = {
    // do something
  }

  override def receive = {
    case _ => ()
  }

  override def postStop {
    println(name + " called postStop().")
  }
}

EDIT²: As mentionned by @DanGetz, one shall not need to call Thread.sleep in an AKKA actor. Here what I needed was a periodical routine. This can be done using the AKKA context scheduler. See: http://doc.akka.io/docs/akka/2.3.3/scala/howto.html#scheduling-periodic-messages . Instead I was blocking the actor in an infinite loop, preventing it to use its asynchronous mecanisms (messages). I changed the title since the problem was actually not involving actor termination.

share|improve this question
    
This is unexpected. Could you share some code? –  drexin May 22 '14 at 9:38
1  
Could your Thread.sleep be preventing receive from ever being called? –  Dan Getz May 22 '14 at 10:27
    
Thx @DanGetz. Actually, it is not Thread.sleep, but the fact that I use an infinite loop. So what I need is an actor which executes some routine periodically to replace this loop, and let the asynchronous mecanisms of the actor work. –  ygu May 22 '14 at 11:21
    
This seems ok, I'll try it out : doc.akka.io/docs/akka/2.3.3/scala/… –  ygu May 22 '14 at 11:24
    
I think what I should have said is, you should pretty much never be calling Thread.sleep from an Actor. –  Dan Getz May 22 '14 at 11:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's hard to gauge exactly what you want now that the question has changed a bit, but I'm going to take a stab anyway. Below you will find a modified version of your code that shows both periodic scheduling of a task (one that kicks off the child termination process) and also watching a child and only creating a new one with the same name when we are sure the previous one has stopped. If you run the code below, every 5 seconds you should see it kill the child and wait for the termination message before stating a new one with the exact same name. I hope this is what you were looking for:

object Supervisor {
  val ChildName = "foo"
  def props(): Props = Props(new Supervisor())
  case class TerminateChild(name:String)
}

case class Supervisor() extends Actor {
  import Supervisor._
  import scala.concurrent.duration._
  import context._

  //Start child upon creation of this actor
  newActor(ChildName)

  override def preStart = {
    //Schedule regular job to run every 5 seconds
    context.system.scheduler.schedule(5 seconds, 5 seconds, self, TerminateChild(ChildName))
  }

  def newActor(name: String): ActorRef = {
    val child = context.actorOf(MyActor.props(name), name)
    watch(child)
    println(s"created child for name $name")
    child
  }

  def terminateActor(name:String) = context.child(ChildName).foreach{ ref =>
    println(s"terminating child for name $name")
    context stop ref
  }

  override def receive = {
    case TerminateChild(name) =>
      terminateActor(name)

    case Terminated(x) => 
      println("Received termination confirmation: " + x)
      newActor(ChildName)

    case _ => println("Unexpected message.")
  }

  override def postStop = {
    println("Supervisor called postStop().")
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you @cmbaxter . I didn't want to answer my own question, since all was in the link I indicated (AKKA doc). But this is more or less the code I have now. Can you just tell why you use context.child(ChildName).foreach{context stop ref} instead of just context.stop(childRef) ? Is it a bad idea to save childRef ? –  ygu May 22 '14 at 13:42
    
@ygu, in your code you had an explicit var to hold the ref to the child. My code shows a way to avoid having to keep that explicit mutable state by leveraging the child(String) method on context. The foreach is basically equivalent to the null check you were doing in your code but a little more scala friendly as it's working with an Option[ActorRef] –  cmbaxter May 22 '14 at 13:45
    
As stated at Best practices If you really need to periodically do something inside an actor, then that scheduler must not be initialized inside the actor –  James Sharp Feb 27 at 11:38
    
@JamesSharp, I don't entirely agree with that persons statement. There is some strong language in there without really backing it up with concrete consequences of taking that approach. You should always mutate internal state in response to messages ( ie don't mutate state in a Future callback), but I don't necessarily see a huge problem with an actor owning its own scheduling. You could argue for a separation of responsibility (scheduling vs the actual business logic), but I don't think the need is that strong to use such language (like always) –  cmbaxter Feb 27 at 11:47
    
I see your point but I tend to agree that is hard to predict the actor state if it evolves on its own, sometimes is handy to do though :P –  James Sharp Feb 27 at 11:58

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