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I'm starting to design the MVVM part of my application and I have some doubt :)

I already have my domain layer with entity where I have defined some logic (methods to add and remove lists, read-only collections, calculated properties ... ) and validation ( made ​​with CodeContract )

Reading the various guides that can be found on the net I found many examples where in MVVM model are created by replicating entities in a mirror and then use this model in the ViewModel classes . I can not directly use my entities?

Another thing (although here I have to study a little bit more because I did not understand what logic there is behind the examples that I've found) is that I have seen many people add validation to your ViewModel , thus replicating what I have already done on My entities. There is no way to directly use the contracts that I have defined on my entities?

at this time the solution is structured so:

Domain layer project (entity and code contract class)
Data access layer project (Nhibernate with Unit of work, repository and map)
Business rule project (WF4 rule for business logic condition)

now what i have to do? Add a new WPF project with one folder for view and one folder for ViewModel?

P.S. As I read it right of Caliburn and I thought to use that framework as it seems to give some extra help MVVM light ( although I have not yet understood what )

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Reading the various guides that can be found on the net I found many examples where in MVVM model are created by replicating entities in a mirror and then use this model in the ViewModel classes. I can not directly use my entities?

There's no reason you cannot directly use your entities in the general case. Of course, there are bound to be "interfacing incompatibilities" between your domain objects and the UI you would like to present, but that's exactly the kind of problem that the viewmodel is supposed to solve.

Another thing is that I have seen many people add validation to your ViewModel, thus replicating what I have already done on my entities.

It's not exactly clear what you mean by "adding validation to the viewmodel", but adding validation rules (i.e. business logic) directly to the viewmodel is plain wrong. Validation rules should always be part of some domain object, which usually means the model itself.

There is no way to directly use the contracts that I have defined on my entities?

If you have enabled runtime checks for your contracts in the build options then it's extremely easy to leverage the contracts for validation by adding an ExceptionValidationRule to the binding (or simply setting ValidatesOnExceptions).

Of course this means that you now have to be careful not to disable the runtime checks, but considering you are already depending on them to enforce the contracts that should not be an issue.

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for example in "MVVM Survival guide for Enterprise architecture" by Ryan Vice i see that he map every DTO object make by entityFramework to a model class and it seem strange to me –  gt.guybrush May 22 '14 at 10:20
    
@gt.guybrush: Obviously some rationale for that is offered in the book, but I haven't read it so I can't comment. –  Jon May 22 '14 at 10:23
    
ValidatesOnExceptions seems good and more simply to do that anythings i find –  gt.guybrush May 22 '14 at 10:24
    
but can we say that using domain object is more simply and linear? With no great drawback –  gt.guybrush May 22 '14 at 10:27
    
@gt.guybrush: That's such a blanket statement that one should be very wary around it. In the absence of other information then yes. –  Jon May 22 '14 at 10:33

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