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I have the following strings stored in variables in shell

a1="aaa,bbb3,12,ccc,"
a2="aaa,2,bbb,ccc,"

I want to execute a common command on the above string variables to remove the object number from the path. an object number is a number between 2 commas.

So the result should be

a1="aaa,bbb3,ccc,"
a2="aaa,bbb,ccc,"

How I can do that?

I tried:

echo ${a1//,[0-9],/,} ==> wrong result
echo ${a2//,[0-9],/,} ==> good result

Also I have the following strings stored in variables in shell

a1="aaa,bbb3,#zu_45,ccc,"
a2="aaa,#mn,bbb,ccc,"
a3="aaa,bbb,ccc,#kn,"

And I want to execute a common command on the above string variables to remove the object which start with # from the path. an object located between 2 commas.

So the result should be

a1="aaa,bbb3,ccc,"
a2="aaa,bbb,ccc,"
a3="aaa,bbb,ccc,"

How I can do that?

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5 Answers 5

You can use this sed:

sed -r 's/,(#.*)?[0-9]+//' file

a1="aaa,bbb3,ccc,"
a2="aaa,bbb,ccc,"
a3="aaa,bbb,ccc,"
share|improve this answer
    
good thank. and for the other pattern? –  MOHAMED May 22 at 10:31
    
What other pattern do you want? Isn't this giving you your expected result? –  anubhava May 22 at 10:37
    
see updated answer. –  anubhava May 22 at 10:50
    
the sed -r 's/,(#.*)?[0-9]+//' file seems does not work –  MOHAMED May 22 at 13:48
2  
It might be worth specifying which implementation of sed it's being tested with. GNU sed, for instance, is quite different from the BSD sed shipped by Apple and others. –  Charles Duffy May 22 at 17:13

For your first question, you can use extglob for this.

$ a1="aaa,bbb3,12,ccc,"
$ a2="aaa,2,bbb,ccc,"
$ shopt -s extglob
$ echo "${a1//,+([0-9]),/,}"
aaa,bbb3,ccc,
$ echo "${a2//,+([0-9]),/,}"
aaa,bbb,ccc,
$

It's well documented in Greg's wiki and many other places.


For your second question, you can handle this either with more advanced pattern matching, or by treating the comma-separated elements as fields and processing them individually.

First, a pattern match solution.

$ a1="aaa,bbb3,#zu_45,ccc,"
$ a2="aaa,#mn,bbb,ccc,"
$ a3="aaa,bbb,ccc,#kn,"
$ echo "${a1//,#+([^,]),/,}"
aaa,bbb3,ccc,
$ echo "${a2//,#+([^,]),/,}"
aaa,bbb,ccc,
$ echo "${a3//,#+([^,]),/,}"
aaa,bbb,ccc,
$

(I'll just point out for any wandering readers that while patterns like this may look like regular expressions, they are not.)

Second, a solution that treats fields like fields would of course involve a loop. Here's an example as a one-liner:

$ a=(${a1//,/ }); unset newa; for i in "${a[@]}"; do if [[ ! $i =~ ^# ]]; then newa="$newa${newa:+,}$i"; fi; done; echo "$newa"
aaa,bbb3,ccc

You can repeat this for the other variables.

Note that this depends on your data not having any spaces in it, since that's the character used to separate fields in a bash array.

share|improve this answer
    
...and for the second one, ${a1//,#*([^,]),/,} would do. I think that extglob is a cleaner solution than bash regexes, so +1 from me. –  Tom Fenech May 22 at 11:38
    
Tom, thanks, I had the same thought, I just took a little longer to add it to the answer. :-) –  ghoti May 22 at 11:46
    
The one-liner at the end is rather evil, conflating whitespace with separators (making foo,bar baz,qux the same as foo,bar,baz,qux). I'd think that setting IFS to , would be a saner approach. The extglob approach is great, though, so +1. –  Charles Duffy May 22 at 17:14

Using pure bash, you can do:

$ re='(.*),[0-9]+,(.*)'
$ a1="aaa,bbb3,12,ccc,"
$ a2="aaa,2,bbb,ccc,"
$ [[ $a1 =~ $re ]] && echo ${BASH_REMATCH[1]},${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
aaa,bbb3,ccc,
$ [[ $a2 =~ $re ]] && echo ${BASH_REMATCH[1]},${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
aaa,bbb,ccc,

Those echos could be turned into assignments, giving you what you wanted.

Rather than doing a search and replace, you can just capture the parts before and after using ( ) and they will be stored in the special array variable $BASH_REMATCH.

For the second one, you could do something similar:

$ re='(.*),#[^,]*,(.*)'
$ a1="aaa,bbb3,#zu_45,ccc,"
$ a2="aaa,#mn,bbb,ccc,"
$ a3="aaa,bbb,ccc,#kn,"
$ [[ $a1 =~ $re ]] && echo ${BASH_REMATCH[1]},${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
aaa,bbb3,ccc,
$ [[ $a2 =~ $re ]] && echo ${BASH_REMATCH[1]},${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
aaa,bbb,ccc,
$ [[ $a3 =~ $re ]] && echo ${BASH_REMATCH[1]},${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
aaa,bbb,ccc,

Using a [^,] (not a comma) character class ensures that the rest of the string isn't consumed.

update

You could turn this into a function like this:

$ rm_hash () { 
>     local re='(.*),#[^,]*,(.*)'
>     local subject="$1"
>     [[ $subject =~ $re ]] && echo ${BASH_REMATCH[1]},${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
> }
$ a1="aaa,bbb3,#zu_45,ccc,"
$ rm_hash $a1
aaa,bbb3,ccc,
share|improve this answer

MOHAMED, assuming that the object number and hash objects can appear in any position within the string (ie: start, middle, end), the following code would do what you are after:

a1="43,aaa,34,#mike,bbb3,12,ccc,32"
echo ${a1} \
| sed 's/^[[:digit:]]\{1,\},//; s/,[[:digit:]]\{1,\},/,/g; s/,[[:digit:]]\{1,\}$//' \
| sed 's/^#[^,]\{1,\},//; s/,#[^,]\{1,\},/,/g; s/,#[^,]\{1,\}$//'

Results in: aaa,bbb3,ccc

NOTE: This solution will work on both GNU and BSD versions of sed.

For readability sake, I've split the answers to different parts of your question into individual sed commands.

- Update -

If you can guarantee that your string is always terminated by a comma then you can simplify the above to:

a1="aaa,12,bbb3,#zu_45,ccc,"
echo ${a1} \
| sed 's/^[[:digit:]]\{1,\},//; s/,[[:digit:]]\{1,\},/,/g' \
| sed 's/^#[^,]\{1,\},//; s/,#[^,]\{1,\},/,/g'

Results in: aaa,bbb3,ccc,

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Not exactly a one-liner, but a bullet-proof method:

IFS=, read -d '' -ra ary <<< "$variable"
unset ary[${#ary[@]}-1]

will create an array ary, the fields of which are the fields in your variable variable (fields are comma-separated). Then, if you want to remove all the numbers:

for i in "${!ary[@]}"; do
    [[ ${ary[i]} = +([[:digit:]]) ]] && unset ary[$i]
done

or to remove all the elements that start with a hash:

for i in "${!ary[@]}"; do
    [[ ${ary[i]} = \#* ]] && unset ary[$i]
done

Finally, to put that back into your variable:

printf -v variable '%s,' "${ary[@]}"

A function that does that:

remove_number() {
    local ary i
    IFS=, read -d '' -ra ary <<< "${!1}"
    unset ary[${#ary[@]}-1]
    for i in "${!ary[@]}"; do
        [[ ${ary[i]} = +([[:digit:]]) ]] && unset ary[$i]
    done
    printf -v "$1" '%s,' "${ary[@]}"
}

Demo (assuming this function is defined in session):

$ a1="aaa,bbb3,12,ccc,"
$ remove_number a1
$ echo "$a1"
aaa,bbb3,ccc,

This also works if there are newlines in variable (notice: it doesn't remove the negative number... that was not really clear from your requirements, but it's rather trivial to modify the function to also handle this, see is_number below):

$ a=$'aaa,\n\nnewline here\n,123456,-1234,abc\n,'
$ echo "$a"
aaa,

newline here
,123456,-1234,abc
,
$ remove_number a
$ echo "$a"
aaa,

newline here
,-1234,abc
,

Oh, and it works if the number appears in the first field (unlike some other answers):

$ a='1234,abc,'
$ b='1234,'
$ remove_number a
$ remove_number b
$ echo "a='$a'"; echo "b='$b'"
a='abc,'
b=','

Also fine for "empty" lists:

$ a=','
$ remove_number a
$ echo "$a"
,

A more functional approach: make a function that removes a field if a condition, given by a function, is met:

remove_cond() {
    # $1 is condition
    # $2 is name of variable that contains list
    local ary i
    IFS=, read -d '' -ra ary <<< "${!2}"
    unset ary[${#ary[@]}-1]
    for i in "${!ary[@]}"; do
        "$1" "${ary[i]}" && unset ary[$i]
    done
    printf -v "$2" '%s,' "${ary[@]}"
}

Then a couple of conditions:

is_number() {
    [[ $1 = ?(-)+([[:digit:]]) ]]
}
is_bang() {
    [[ $1 = \#* ]]
}
is_bang_or_number() {
    is_number "$1" || is_bang "$1"
}

With these set in current session:

$ a="aaa,bbb3,#zu_45,ccc,"
$ remove_cond is_bang a
$ echo "$a"
aaa,bbb3,ccc,
$ a='1234,#lol,keep me please,-1234,'
$ remove_cond is_bang_or_number a
$ echo "$a"
keep me please,
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