Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm unsure if this actually is the problem, but let me explain: I have a python script that gets started by a bash script. The bash script's job is done then, but when I grep the ps aux the call is still present.

#!/bin/bash
export http_proxy='1.2.3.4:1234'
python -u /home/user/folder/myscript.py -some Parameters >> /folder/Logfile_stout.log 2>&1 

If I grep for ps aux | grep python I get the python -u /home/user/folder/myscript.py -some Parameters as a result. According to the logfile the python script closed properly. (Code to end the script is within the script itself.) The script gets started every hour and I still see all the calls from the hours before.

Thanks in advance for your help, tips or advice!

share|improve this question
1  
So apparently your Python script doesn't terminate. We can't tell you why it doesn't without seeing the code of the script. – Sven Marnach May 22 '14 at 10:31
1  
Are you running an infinite loop or something. Without knowing what the script does, its hard to diagnose the problem. – Games Brainiac May 22 '14 at 10:31
    
I used the answer from gaoithe and made it work for me. So, in my python script I check what time it is and when the hardcoded time is reached the script is stopped - with a cleanup function that uses atexit. Meanwhile the Bash script that started the python script sleeps for the same time and then kills off its child and itself. Tested it and it works.. Not very beautiful, but works. – Jasi May 23 '14 at 14:33
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The parent bash script will remain as long as the child (python script) is running. If you start the python script running in background (add & at end of python line) then the parent will exit.

#!/bin/bash
export http_proxy='1.2.3.4:1234'
python -u /home/user/folder/myscript.py -some Parameters >> /folder/Logfile_stout.log 2>&1 &

If you examine the process list (e.g. 'ps -elf'). It will show the child (if still running). The child PPID (parent PID) will be 1(root PID) instead of the parent PID because the parent doesn't exist any more.

It could eventually be a problem if your python script never exits. You could make the parent script wait and kill the child, e.g. wait 30 secs and kill child if it is still present:

#!/bin/bash
export http_proxy='1.2.3.4:1234'
python -u /home/user/folder/myscript.py -some Parameters >> /folder/Logfile_stout.log 2>&1 &
sleep 30
jobs
kill %1
kill -9 %1
jobs
share|improve this answer
1  
ah, the little & at the end.. I'm testing that right now. I'll report back! – Jasi May 22 '14 at 11:56
1  
it still doesn't work. When I kill it with the sleep command as you suggested it works of course, but I want to kill the script from within itself. I just want to make sure the parent dies along or if possible directly after it (the bash script/parent) started the script. – Jasi May 23 '14 at 7:54
1  
If you want the python script to end itself then that is a matter for the python script. If the python script ends itself then the parent will end immediately after. So you don't need any of the sleep and kill stuff. – gaoithe May 23 '14 at 11:28
1  
What do you mean 'kill the script from within itself'? For that we need to be talking about the python script contents and behaviour. – gaoithe May 23 '14 at 11:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.