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I can't find the "is not" operator in C#. For example I have the code below which does not work. I need to check that err is not of type class ThreadAbortException.

    catch (Exception err)
    {
        if (err is not ThreadAbortException)
        {
        }
    }
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Thank you, the both answers are working ;) –  Tomas Mar 4 '10 at 15:30
    
You could do this: If Not object.ReferenceEquals(err.GetType(), GetType(ThreadAbortException)) Then –  Quandary Sep 12 '12 at 10:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 33 down vote accepted

Just change the catch block to:

catch(ThreadAbortException ex)
{
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
}

so you can handle ThreadAbortExceptions and all others separately.

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1  
This is a better solution to the current situation. +1 –  Rob Fonseca-Ensor Mar 4 '10 at 15:29
2  
Whew, that was close. I hate seeing !(a is B) anywhere! –  ChaosPandion Mar 4 '10 at 15:31
    
Looking at the code snippet in the question actually made me confused, it was if I'd forgot how to catch exceptions. This is the correct way indeed. –  Finglas Mar 4 '10 at 15:34
3  
Make sure to put the more general Exception object at the bottom. You should always start with the more precise type and go down with the more general one. –  ALOToverflow Mar 4 '10 at 15:35
    
+1 for solving the hidden question –  bendewey Mar 5 '10 at 3:56

In this case, wrap and check the boolean opposite:

if (!(err is ThreadAbortException))
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+1: This is the normal way, but catch blocks have a better way. –  Richard Mar 4 '10 at 15:34

More than likely what you ought to do in this circumstance is:

try
{
   // Do Something
}
catch (ThreadAbortException threadEx)
{
   // Do something specific
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
   // Do something more generic
}

You can have multiple catch blocks for a try. Always make sure to order them such that the most specific is on top, and the most generic (catch (Exception ex)) is last because the lookup order is from top to bottom, so if you put the catch (Exception ex) first, it will always be the only one to run.

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You should be able to do something like this:

catch (Exception err){
    if (!(err is ThreadAbortException)) {
    //Code
    }
}
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One reason you might want to catch separate exception types is that you can use a different finally block on each type of exception. Perhaps some exceptions are not recoverable (you clean up your resources in the finally block if these exceptions occur) while others are recoverable (you leave resources intact, and allow the caller to sort it out). –  Robert Harvey Mar 4 '10 at 15:34

Perhaps you are looking for this:

if(err.GetType() != typeof(ThreadAbortException))
{

}

But I strongly recommend using a separate catch statement, as suggested by Lee.

catch(ThreadAbortException ex)
{

}
catch(Exception ex)
{

}
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Lee has the best answer.

Just to add, you should always catch from the most specific down to the most general. In your case the ThreadAbortException is the most specific so deal with that first.

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