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My Apache directory for storing files is /var/www.

If i run,

sudo chown -R www-data:www-data /var/www

This makes the www-data the owner of the www folder. Since all static/dynamic files will be served by the Apache User, why do i now need to give this folder 755 permissions? It should just work with giving 700 permissions, right? Since with 700 permissions, the owner(www-data) has full permissions for the folder.

Therefore, my question, why do i need to run:

sudo chmod -R 755 /var/www

instead of

sudo chmod -R 700 /var/www

EDIT: I am not facing any error. I am only asking this question for knowledge. I have been suggested to put 755 permission on the /var/www/ folder by a lot of people. Just wanted to know why couldn't i use 700.

share|improve this question
    
First just check if "www-data" is indeed your Apache user. Run this command: echo $(ps axho user,comm|grep -E "httpd|apache"|uniq|grep -v "root"|awk 'END {if ($1) print $1}') – John Crawford May 22 '14 at 11:29
    
Yes, this outputs 'www-data' – Kanishk Dudeja May 22 '14 at 11:58
    
This is strange then. Please put the "700" value back on the folder and can you update your question with the exact error output you get in your error_log file when you try to view your website – John Crawford May 22 '14 at 13:59
    
@JohnCrawford: I have no error. I just asked this question for knowledge. I have been suggested to put 755 permissions on the var/www/ folder by a lot of people. Just wanted to know why 700 wouldn't work. – Kanishk Dudeja May 22 '14 at 14:00
1  
Sorry, that was a bit ambiguous of what I said. I meant that you should only have 755 if you followed the setup used in that link. On your setup, 700 will work. However just so you know, your setup is not regarded as safe. For example because the entire folder is read/write/execute, I could upload a malicious script on your server AND then execute it. – John Crawford May 23 '14 at 8:48
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The best layout depends on a few factors. Primarily this is a question of security. Here are a few things to consider:

1) Do you want your web server to be able to write files to your DocumentRoot? Most of the time the answer is no... the exception being things like upload directories. In this case you want something like 755, where the owner/group is not the user that Apache is running as.

2) Do you have local user accounts (like developers) that should be able to access the content? If yes, you might want something like 755, root:developers for permissions, with Apache running as "www-data" or "apache", and not in the group (subject to #1 above).

3) Do those devs need to be able to edit the content (do a code push)? In that case, perhaps 775 root:developers is better.

The primary problem with 700 is that it requires the owner to be the user that Apache is running as, and that gives it full permissions to modify any file in the DocumentRoot. This is usually considered a security weakness because generally speaking the web server should not be modifying files in the DocumentRoot apart from pretty specific exceptions.

A common exploitation, is for an attacker to trick your web app into uploading something like a malicious PHP script somewhere into the DocumentRoot, and then visiting that page. One of the countermeasures is to disallow Apache from writing to the DocumentRoot via this sort of filesystem permissions.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. Though I have a doubt. "In this case you want something like 755, where the owner/group is not the user that Apache is running as.". In case of file uploads, which user will attempt to do the file upload? Shouldn't it be www-data? – Kanishk Dudeja May 24 '14 at 12:30
    
Correct- that's a case where Apache does need to own the directory. I realize I worded that poorly. "In this case" refers to the preceding situation, where uploads are not involved. Uploads, being the exception, would require something else. – jakem May 26 '14 at 3:27
    
Thanks for the clarification. :) – Kanishk Dudeja May 26 '14 at 5:39

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