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I would like to understand the use of "elim" and "induction" on Coq... Why ? Because i have been tried to do some exercises and didn't not understand why i must use sometimes the "elim" and other times "induction"...

For example :

Lemma parte2_1_b : forall l, sum(rev l) = sum l.
Proof.
intro.
induction l.
simpl.
reflexivity.
simpl.
SearchRewrite(_++_).
SearchAbout(_++_).
rewrite parte2_1_a.
simpl.
rewrite IHl.
SearchAbout(_+_).
rewrite <- plus_n_O.
(*omega.
Qed*)
(*
ring.
Qed.
*)
SearchRewrite(_+_).
rewrite plus_comm.
reflexivity.
Qed.

The other example :

Lemma parte2_1_c : forall l1 l2, Prefix l1 l2 -> sum l1 <= sum l2.
Proof.
intros.
elim H.
intros.
simpl.
SearchPattern(_<=_).
apply le_0_n.
intros.
simpl.
SearchPattern(_<=_).
(*omega*)
apply plus_le_compat_l.
assumption.
Qed.

I've been looking for the documentation on the website, and i still don't understand on how am i supposed to choose the one correctly... May someone helps me, please ?

Missing Functions :

Fixpoint sum (l: list nat) : nat := match l with
  | nil => 0
  | a::t => a + sum t
  end.

The other function :

Lemma parte2_1_a : forall l1 l2, sum (l1++l2) = sum l1 + sum l2.
Proof.
intros.
induction l1.
simpl.
reflexivity.
simpl.
(*
omega.
Qed.
*)
rewrite IHl1.
SearchRewrite(_+_).
rewrite plus_assoc.
reflexivity.
Qed.

I think that now, you will be able to run the program now.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As @Ptival said, elim and induction perform almost the exact same action on the goal. The main difference you will see is that the shape of the goal might be a bit different: for example elim leaves the induction hypothesis in the goal

Lemma parte2_1_b : forall l, sum(rev l) = sum l.
Proof.
    intro.
    induction l.
    simpl.
    reflexivity.


1 subgoal
l : list nat
====================================================================== (1/1)
forall (a : nat) (l0 : list nat),
sum (rev l0) = sum l0 -> sum (rev (a :: l0)) = sum (a :: l0)

whereas induction name it in the context:

Lemma parte2_1_b : forall l, sum(rev l) = sum l.
Proof.
    intro.
    induction l.
    simpl.
    reflexivity.

1 subgoal
a : nat
l : list nat
IHl : sum (rev l) = sum l
====================================================================== (1/1)
sum (rev (a :: l)) = sum (a :: l)

In the first case, if you do clear l; intros a l IHl you will end up having the exact same goal as in the second one.

There exists very particular uses for elim that induction can't do, but the only relevant cases I know are for hardcore crazy users, and is not really useful most of the time. I have used Coq for years now and I encountered such a case only once, and I didn't really needed it in the end, so I advise you don't bother yourself and stick to use induction for now.

I hope it is a bit more clear now.

Best, V.

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Then i forget the use of elim and try to use induction ? –  Damiii May 23 at 15:41
1  
That would be my advice for now: focus on induction and come back to this question when you are more familiar with it :) –  Vinz May 23 at 15:52
    
I tried to do it with induction and i have been stucked :/ I did post a question here : stackoverflow.com/questions/23833080/… –  Damiii May 23 at 15:55
    
Hey @Vinz, I'd be interested in exotic uses of elim! :-) –  Ptival May 23 at 18:36
    
Well, as you said the induction make this thing harder ! I think i might stay with the elim function :/ I saw the response from my other topic and it's a lot more harder than i tought it could be. –  Damiii May 23 at 21:00

As a general question-related advice, it's hard to help you when we can't run the code you give. Giving a working minimal example or a pointer to the definitions you use is appreciated.

As for your question, elim x. and induction x. seem to be doing very similar things. As far as I can see, the difference seems to be that induction performs a bit more work by:

  • introducing the induction hypothesis in your context, whereas elim leaves them quantified over in the goal

  • cleaning up the context of the variable being inducted upon, whereas elim leaves it there

They might have some more specific differences in behaviors, but as far as proving is concerned, I'm fairly sure they are similarly powerful (in that they both call the inductor of your type). So you shouldn't be too concerned I believe. I personally never use elim and always use induction, because I tend to like the extra work it does.

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If I recall correctly, you are right: induction can be seen as a wrapper around elim that leaves the goal in a "nicer" state. Basically they both apply <your_type>_rect to the goal. –  Vinz May 23 at 7:18
    
I have edited my post and put the missing functions ! So if you don't use the elim function, how could i use the induction fuction? –  Damiii May 23 at 13:17
    
@Vinz Didn't understood :( –  Damiii May 23 at 13:18

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