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I would like to specialized the behaviour of a template function member according to the enum member of the class it is operating on. I am pretty sure this is doable but I can't see how. Here is a failed attempt which doesn't compile (why ?). In fact I already got a working solution for my project (using inheritance) but this isn't nice and I am curious about what could be done.

#include <iostream>

struct A
{
    enum
    {
        Size = 2    
    };
};

struct B
{
    enum
    {
        Size = 3
    };
};

template <int I>
struct EnumToType
{
    static const int e = I;
};

template <typename T, typename U>
struct C {};

template <typename T>
struct D
{
    typedef C<T, typename EnumToType<T::Size> > Type;
};

template <typename T>
struct C<T, EnumToType<2> >
{
    void operator()()
    {
        std::cout << "hi !" << std::endl;
    }    
};

template <typename T>
struct C<T, EnumToType<3> >
{
    void operator()()
    {
        std::cout << "hello !" << std::endl;
    }    
};

int main()
{
    D<A>::Type da;
    D<B>::Type db;
    da();
    db();
    return 0;
}

A useful link...

share|improve this question
    
This question and answers to it may be helpful. –  Constructor May 22 at 18:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
typedef C<T, typename EnumToType<T::Size> > Type;

The typename keyword here is meaningless and illegal, just remove it.

share|improve this answer
    
I removed it and it worked. Thanks ! Are there a better c++03 way to achieve what I want though ? –  matovitch May 22 at 18:44
    
I don't see why you need EnumToType at all, might just use the values directly. Other than that, no, I don't see anything bad here. –  n.m. May 22 at 18:50
    
It worked again ! I thought it wouldn't work because of the link I gave at the end (as well as the link given by Constructor) but this pseudo-template-typedef isn't partial template specialization (apparently) so it work. :-) –  matovitch May 22 at 18:55

The general pattern looks as follows (using a bool instead of an enum type, but the principle stays the same):

template<typename FalseType, typename TrueType, bool condition> 
struct ConditionalTypeSelector {
    typedef void ResultType;
};

template<typename FalseType, typename TrueType>
struct ConditionalTypeSelector<FalseType,TrueType,false> {
    typedef FalseType ResultType;
};

template<typename FalseType, typename TrueType>
struct ConditionalTypeSelector<FalseType,TrueType,true> {
    typedef TrueType ResultType;
};

Use it somewhere else

ConditionalTypeSelector<A,B,(sizeof(A) > sizeof(B))>::ResultType
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate the time you take to answer my question but this isn't the same pattern. Your example is just template specialization, the condition doesn't depend on A or B static const member...or I am misunderstanding something. –  matovitch May 22 at 19:05
    
@matovitch I've taken this sample quickly from a blog entry of mine. The ConditionalTypeSelector class could be easily use your proposed enum type instead of bool condition, and have more specializations for the enum values of course. I still think it's the same pattern. –  πάντα ῥεῖ May 22 at 19:10

I have to question what it is you are trying to achieve, but here is one way of solving your example:

struct A
{
    static const int Size = 2;
};

struct B
{
    static const int Size = 3;
};

template<int message_id>
struct Message;

template<>
struct Message<2>
{
    void operator()()
    {
        std::cout << "hi !" << std::endl;
    }    
};

template<>
struct Message<3>
{
    void operator()()
    {
        std::cout << "hello !" << std::endl;
    }
};

template<typename T>
struct SizeStructToMessage
{
    void operator()()
    {
        Message<T::Size> msg;
        msg();
    }
};

int main()
{
    SizeStructToMessage<A> a;
    SizeStructToMessage<B> b;
    a();
    b();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it's that same pattern. Doesn't matter if you have a call operator, typedef or whatever. In case of the op's question he want's to do this with an enumeration not an int, but it pretty much boils down to the same thing. –  πάντα ῥεῖ May 22 at 20:15
    
@Curg I am implementing a library for discrete wavelet transform using lifting scheme. I especially use template for loops unrolling. In this case, I wanted to implement ApplyForward and ApplyReverse functors which shouldn't exhibit the same behaviour if the lifting to apply is primal or dual (since I am using traits classes, using inheritance means moving them back up alias more boiler-plate :/). –  matovitch May 22 at 22:34

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