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I'm implementing variadic min/max functions. A goal is to take advantage of the compile time known number of arguments and perform an unrolled evaluation (avoid run-time loops). The current state of the code is as follows (presenting min - max is similar)

#include <iostream>  

using namespace std;

template<typename T>
T vmin(T val1, T val2)
{
    return val1 < val2 ? val1 : val2;
}

template<typename T, typename... Ts>
T vmin(T val1, T val2, Ts&&... vs)
{
    return val1 < val2 ?
        vmin(val1, std::forward<Ts>(vs)...) : 
            vmin(val2, std::forward<Ts>(vs)...);
}

int main()
{
    cout << vmin(3, 2, 1, 2, 5) << endl;    
    cout << vmin(3., 1.2, 1.3, 2., 5.2) << endl;
    return 0;
}

Now this works, but I have some questions / problems :

  1. The non variadic overload has to accept its arguments by value. If I try passing other types of ref I have the following results

    • universal references && -> compilation error
    • const references const& -> OK
    • plain references & -> compilation error

    Now I know that function templates mix weirdly with templates but is there any specific know-how for the mix up at hand ? What type of arguments should I opt for?

  2. Wouldn't the expansion of the parameter pack by sufficient ? Do I really need to forward my arguments to the recursive call ?

  3. Is this functionallity better implemented when wrapped inside a struct and exposed as a static member function. Would the ability to partial specialize buy me anything ?

  4. Is there a more robust/efficient implementation/design for the function version ? (particullarly I'm wondering whether a constexpr version would be a match for the efficiency of template metaprogramming)

share|improve this question
    
Good question. You can even implement min like this. –  M M. May 22 at 19:07
2  
Why don't you use std::min with std::initializer_list, i.e. template <typename ...Args> auto vmin(Args&&... args) { return std::min({ std::forward<Args>(args)... }); }? –  nosid May 22 at 19:12
    
@nosid Ok valid point, but I'm trying (again it may not have much meaning) to implement a version that would perform compile time unrolling, as opposed to a function that runs a loop at runtime (maybe I should mention that in the question - I just noticed that it's not apparent) –  Nikos Athanasiou May 22 at 19:14
    
@nosid I think you should use something like std::common_type in your variant. –  Constructor May 22 at 19:23
2  
Consider implementing along the lines of vmin(vmin(val1, val2), vs...). –  Hurkyl May 22 at 21:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

live example

This does perfect forwarding on arguments. It relies on RVO for return values, as it returns a value type regardless of the input types, because common_type does that.

I implemented common_type deduction, allowing mixed types to be passed in, and the "expected" result type output.

We support the min of 1 element, because it makes the code slicker.

#include <utility>
#include <type_traits>

template<typename T>
T vmin(T&&t)
{
  return std::forward<T>(t);
}

template<typename T0, typename T1, typename... Ts>
typename std::common_type<
  T0, T1, Ts...
>::type vmin(T0&& val1, T1&& val2, Ts&&... vs)
{
  if (val2 < val1)
    return vmin(val2, std::forward<Ts>(vs)...);
  else
    return vmin(val1, std::forward<Ts>(vs)...);
}


int main()
{
  std::cout << vmin(3, 2, 0.9, 2, 5) << std::endl;

  std::cout << vmin(3., 1.2, 1.3, 2., 5.2) << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

Now, while the above is a perfectly acceptable solution, it isn't ideal.

The expression ((a<b)?a:b) = 7 is legal C++, but vmin( a, b ) = 7 is not, because std::common_type decays is arguments blindly (caused by what I consider an over-reaction to it returning rvalue references when fed two value-types in an older implementation of std::common_type).

Simply using decltype( true?a:b ) is tempting, but it both results in the rvalue reference problem, and does not support common_type specializations (as an example, std::chrono). So we both want to use common_type and do not want to use it.

Secondly, writing a min function that doesn't support unrelated pointers and does not let the user change the comparison function seems wrong.

So what follows is a more complex version of the above. live example:

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>
#include <type_traits>

namespace my_min {

  // a common_type that when fed lvalue references all of the same type, returns an lvalue reference all of the same type
  // however, it is smart enough to also understand common_type specializations.  This works around a quirk
  // in the standard, where (true?x:y) is an lvalue reference, while common_type< X, Y >::type is not.
  template<typename... Ts>
  struct my_common_type;

  template<typename T>
  struct my_common_type<T>{typedef T type;};

  template<typename T0, typename T1, typename... Ts>
  struct my_common_type<T0, T1, Ts...> {
    typedef typename std::common_type<T0, T1>::type std_type;
    // if the types are the same, don't change them, unlike what common_type does:
    typedef typename std::conditional< std::is_same< T0, T1 >::value,
      T0,
    std_type >::type working_type;
    // Careful!  We do NOT want to return an rvalue reference.  Just return T:
    typedef typename std::conditional<
      std::is_rvalue_reference< working_type >::value,
      typename std::decay< working_type >::type,
      working_type
    >::type common_type_for_first_two;
    // TODO: what about Base& and Derived&?  Returning a Base& might be the right thing to do.
    // on the other hand, that encourages silent slicing.  So maybe not.
    typedef typename my_common_type< common_type_for_first_two, Ts... >::type type;
  };
  template<typename... Ts>
  using my_common_type_t = typename my_common_type<Ts...>::type;
  // not that this returns a value type if t is an rvalue:
  template<typename Picker, typename T>
  T pick(Picker&& /*unused*/, T&&t)
  {
    return std::forward<T>(t);
  }
  // slight optimization would be to make Picker be forward-called at the actual 2-arg case, but I don't care:
  template<typename Picker, typename T0, typename T1, typename... Ts>
  my_common_type_t< T0, T1, Ts...> pick(Picker&& picker, T0&& val1, T1&& val2, Ts&&... vs)
  {
    // if picker doesn't prefer 2 over 1, use 1 -- stability!
    if (picker(val2, val1))
      return pick(std::forward<Picker>(pick), val2, std::forward<Ts>(vs)...);
    else
      return pick(std::forward<Picker>(pick), val1, std::forward<Ts>(vs)...);
  }

  // possibly replace with less<void> in C++1y?
  struct lesser {
    template<typename LHS, typename RHS>
    bool operator()( LHS&& lhs, RHS&& rhs ) const {
      return std::less< typename std::decay<my_common_type_t<LHS, RHS>>::type >()(
          std::forward<LHS>(lhs), std::forward<RHS>(rhs)
      );
    }
  };
  // simply forward to the picked_min function with a smart less than functor
  // note that we support unrelated pointers!
  template<typename... Ts>
  auto min( Ts&&... ts )->decltype( pick( lesser(), std::declval<Ts>()... ) )
  {
    return pick( lesser(), std::forward<Ts>(ts)... );
  }
}

int main()
{
  int x = 7;
  int y = 3;
  int z = -1;
  my_min::min(x, y, z) = 2;
  std::cout << x << "," << y << "," << z << "\n";
  std::cout << my_min::min(3, 2, 0.9, 2, 5) << std::endl;
  std::cout << my_min::min(3., 1.2, 1.3, 2., 5.2) << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

The downside to the above implementation is that most classes do not support operator=(T const&)&&=delete -- ie, they do not block rvalues from being assigned to, which can lead to surprises if one of the types in the min does not . Fundamental types do.

Which is a side note: start deleting your rvalue reference operator=s people.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm. Despite naive reading of common_type saying common_type<X,Y>::type is the type of true?std::declval<X>():std::declval<Y>(), it appears that common_type<int&, int&>::type is not int& but rather int. Strange. –  Yakk May 22 at 20:12
    
I think the base case should have a single argument, this also removes the need to separate T2&& v0 from the parameter pack. See ideone.com/5J6BBw –  Ben Voigt May 22 at 20:15
    
Oh better yet, lose the std::common_type entirely. See ideone.com/OcQZ06 –  Ben Voigt May 22 at 20:20
    
@Yakk I think it is so because common_type<int&, float&>::type can not be float&. –  Constructor May 22 at 20:22
3  
Stepanov argues that min(a, b) should return a iff a <= b, that is, b < a ? b : a. Has to do with "natural order" and is related to stability. Somewhere in this series: youtube.com/watch?v=aIHAEYyoTUc –  dyp May 22 at 23:05

I appreciate the thought Yakk put into return types so I wouldn't have to, but it gets a lot simpler:

template<typename T>
T&& vmin(T&& val)
{
    return std::forward<T>(val);
}

template<typename T0, typename T1, typename... Ts>
auto vmin(T0&& val1, T1&& val2, Ts&&... vs)
{
    return (val1 < val2) ?
      vmin(val1, std::forward<Ts>(vs)...) :
      vmin(val2, std::forward<Ts>(vs)...);
}

Return type deduction is pretty awesome (may require C++14).

share|improve this answer
1  
"may require C++14" It does require C++1y. I wonder if decltype(auto) might be a better choice here. Also, stackoverflow.com/questions/23815138/… –  dyp May 22 at 23:08
    
Pass it two std::chrono types that differ: common_type is smarter than ? –  Yakk May 22 at 23:20
    
@Yakk: But which result is "better"? Is it necessary that vmin work on types for which ?: does not? –  Ben Voigt May 22 at 23:33
    
@BenVoigt: A question, what is the advantageous of && in this case rather than const & while the min isn't copying or modifying the inputs? Isn't it better to pass the inputs by const & (which doesn't need to perfect-forwarding) as same as this? –  M M. May 23 at 8:32
1  
@MM. As I said in a comment to your question, the arguments are copied/moved. The auto return type deduction, like template type deduction, never deduces a reference, hence this function returns by value. (Therefore my suggestion to use decltype(auto).) –  dyp May 23 at 10:10

You cannot bind a temporary to a non-const reference, that is why you probably get the compilation error. That is, in vmin(3, 2, 1, 2, 5), the parameters are temporaries. It will work if you declare them as for example int first=3,second=2 and so on, then invoke vmin(first,second...)

share|improve this answer

4) Here is one possible way to implement a constexpr version of this function:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template <typename Arg1, typename Arg2>
constexpr typename std::common_type<Arg1, Arg2>::type vmin(Arg1&& arg1, Arg2&& arg2)
{
    return arg1 < arg2 ? std::forward<Arg1>(arg1) : std::forward<Arg2>(arg2);
}

template <typename Arg, typename... Args>
constexpr typename std::common_type<Arg, Args...>::type vmin(Arg&& arg, Args&&... args)
{
    return vmin(std::forward<Arg>(arg), vmin(std::forward<Args>(args)...));
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << vmin(3, 2, 1, 2, 5) << std::endl;
    std::cout << vmin(3., 1.2, 1.3, 2., 5.2) << std::endl;
}

See live example.

Edit: As @Yakk noted in comments the code std::forward<Arg1>(arg1) < std::forward<Arg2>(arg2) ? std::forward<Arg1>(arg1) : std::forward<Arg2>(arg2) may cause problems in some situations. arg1 < arg2 ? std::forward<Arg1>(arg1) : std::forward<Arg2>(arg2) is more appropriate variant in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
You forward the same argument twice along some execution paths (and not a chain). This is a bad idea. If an rvalue overload for < is destructive, you'll return nonsense. –  Yakk May 22 at 19:59
    
@Yakk Oh, I think you are right. Can I steal the solution of this problem from your answer to fix my one? –  Constructor May 22 at 20:04
    
@Yakk Thank you! –  Constructor May 22 at 20:09

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