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I have a large C/C++ program on a Suse linux system. We do automated testing of it with a bash script, which sends input to the program, and reads the output. It's mainly "black-box" testing, but some tests need to know a few internal details to determine if a test has passed.

One test in particular needs to know how times the program runs a certain function (which parses a particular response message). When that function runs it issues a log and increments a counter variable. The automated test currently determines the number of invocations by grepping in the log file for the log message, and counting the number of occurrences before and after the test. This isn't ideal, because the logs (syslog-ng) aren't guaranteed, and they're frequently turned off by configuration, because they're basically debug logs.

I'm looking for a better alternative. I can change the program to enhance the testability, but it shouldn't be heavy impact to normal operation. My first thought was, I could just read the counter after each test. Something like this:

gdb --pid=$PID --batch -ex "p numServerResponseX"

That's slow when it runs, but it's good because the program doesn't need to be changed at all. With a little work, I could probably write a ptrace command to do this a little more efficiently.

But I'm wondering if there isn't a simpler way to do this. Could I write the counter to shared memory (with shm_open / mmap), and then read /dev/shm in the bash script? Is there some simpler way I could setup the counter to make it easy to read, without making it slow to increment?

Edit:

Details: The test setup is like this:

testScript <-> sipp <-> programUnderTest <-> externalServer

The bash testScript injects sip messages with sipp, and it generally determines success or failure based on the completion code from sipp. But in certain tests it needs to know the number of responses the program received from the external server. The function "processServerResponseX" processes certain responses from the external server. During the testing there isn't much traffic running, so the function is only invoked perhaps 20 times over 10 seconds. When each test ends and we want to check the counter, there should be essentially no traffic. However during normal operation, it might be invoked hundreds of times a second. The function is roughly:

unsigned long int numServerResponseX;
int processServerResponseX(DMsg_t * dMsg, AppId id)
{
   if (DEBUG_ENABLED)
   {
       syslog(priority, "%s received %d", __func__, (int) id);
   }
   myMutex->getLock();
   numServerResponseX++;
   doLockedStuff(dMsg, id);
   myMutex->releaseLock();

   return doOtherStuff(dMsg, id);
}

The script currently does:

grep processServerResponseX /var/log/logfile | wc -l

and compares the value before and after. My goal is to have this work even if DEBUG_ENABLED is false, and not have it be too slow. The program is multi-threaded, and it runs on an i86_64 smp machine, so adding any long blocking function would not be a good solution.

share|improve this question
    
How often is that particular function running (hundreds, or billions of times)? It is critically quick to run (i.e. running less than a few microseconds) or more than a millisecond? –  Basile Starynkevitch May 22 '14 at 19:08
1  
Your stock kernel may not have it but you could use systemtap and the CONFIG_UTRACE feature to trace which functions your program executed. –  Brian Cain May 22 '14 at 19:16
    
You should explain a bit more what sort of application are you coding, and how often the certain function is running. –  Basile Starynkevitch May 22 '14 at 19:30
2  
And yes, it is perfectly fine to read the memory contents of the shared memory segment using /dev/shm/whatever file nodes. That's why they exist in the first place. If your counter/s are properly aligned volatile longs (for whatever definition of this that works for you) you will be able to get a consistent reading every time you access it (optionally stick a __sync_synchronize() after the counter update if you're on a massive smp machine). –  oakad May 23 '14 at 2:54
1  
@oakad: No need for volatile or relying on x86/x86-64 atomic access rules. Instead, use __sync_fetch_and_add(&numDiameterResponseX, 1L) to increase the counter atomically without any locking, and __sync_fetch_and_add(&numDiameterResponseX, 0L) to read it atomically (everywhere you read it!), and it'll work on all architectures GCC supports. It has very little overhead, too (it optimizes to lock xaddl %2, (%1) in x86 and x86-64 assembly). –  Nominal Animal May 23 '14 at 15:38

4 Answers 4

I would have that certain function "(which parses a particular response message)" write (probably using fopen then fprintf then fclose) some textual data somewhere.

That destination could be a FIFO (see fifo(7) ...) or a temporary file in a tmpfs file system (which is a RAM file system), maybe /run/

If your C++ program is big and complex enough, you could consider adding some probing facilities (some means for an external program to query about the internal state of your C++ program) e.g. a dedicated web service (using libonion in a separate thread), or some interface to systemd, or to D-bus, or some remote procedure call service like ONC/RPC, JSON-RPC, etc etc...

You might be interested by POCOlib. Perhaps its logging framework should interest you.

As you mentioned, you might use Posix shared memory & semaphores (see shm_overview(7) and sem_overview(7) ...).

Perhaps the Linux specific eventfd(2) is what you need.... (you could code a tiny C program to be invoked by your testing bash scripts....)

You could also try to change the command line (I forgot how to do that, maybe libproc or write to /proc/self/cmdline see proc(5)...). Then ps would show it.

share|improve this answer

I personally do usually use the methods Basile Starynkevitch outlined for this, but I wanted to bring up an alternative method using realtime signals.

I am not claiming this is the best solution, but it is simple to implement and has very little overhead. The main downside is that the size of the request and response are both limited to one int (or technically, anything representable by an int or by a void *).

Basically, you use a simple helper program to send a signal to the application. The signal has a payload of one int your application can examine, and based on it, the application responds by sending the same signal back to the originator, with an int of its own as payload.

If you don't need any locking, you can use a simple realtime signal handler. When it catches a signal, it examines the siginfo_t structure. If sent via sigqueue(), the request is in the si_value member of the siginfo_t structure. The handler answers to the originating process (si_pid member of the structure) using sigqueue(), with the response. This only requires about sixty lines of code to be added to your application. Here is an example application, app1.c:

#define  _POSIX_C_SOURCE 200112L
#include <unistd.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <errno.h>

#include <string.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#define   INFO_SIGNAL (SIGRTMAX-1)

/* This is the counter we're interested in */    
static int counter = 0;

static void responder(int signum, siginfo_t *info,
                      void *context __attribute__((unused)))
{
    if (info && info->si_code == SI_QUEUE) {
        union sigval value;
        int response, saved_errno;

        /* We need to save errno, to avoid interfering with
         * the interrupted thread. */
        saved_errno = errno;

        /* Incoming signal value (int) determines
         * what we respond back with. */
        switch (info->si_value.sival_int) {

        case 0: /* Request loop counter */
            response = *(volatile int *)&counter;
            break;

        /* Other codes? */

        default: /* Respond with -1. */
            response = -1;
        }

        /* Respond back to signaler. */
        value.sival_ptr = (void *)0L;
        value.sival_int = response;
        sigqueue(info->si_pid, signum, value);

        /* Restore errno. This way the interrupted thread
         * will not notice any change in errno. */
        errno = saved_errno;
    }
}

static int install_responder(const int signum)
{
    struct sigaction act;
    sigemptyset(&act.sa_mask);
    act.sa_sigaction = responder;
    act.sa_flags = SA_SIGINFO;
    if (sigaction(signum, &act, NULL))
        return errno;
    else
        return 0;
}

int main(void)
{
    if (install_responder(INFO_SIGNAL)) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Cannot install responder signal handler: %s.\n",
                        strerror(errno));
        return 1;
    }
    fprintf(stderr, "PID = %d\n", (int)getpid());
    fflush(stderr);

    /* The application follows.
     * This one just loops at 100 Hz, printing a dot
     * about once per second or so. */

    while (1) {
        struct timespec t;

        counter++;

        if (!(counter % 100)) {
            putchar('.');
            fflush(stdout);
        }

        t.tv_sec = 0;
        t.tv_nsec = 10000000; /* 10ms */
        nanosleep(&t, NULL);

        /* Note: Since we ignore the remainder
         *       from the nanosleep call, we
         *       may sleep much shorter periods
         *       when a signal is delivered. */
    }

    return 0;
}

The above responder responds to query 0 with the counter value, and with -1 to everything else. You can add other queries simply by adding a suitable case statement in responder().

Note that locking primitives (except for sem_post()) are not async-signal safe, and thus should not be used in a signal handler. So, the above code cannot implement any locking.

Signal delivery can interrupt a thread in a blocking call. In the above application, the nanosleep() call is usually interrupted by the signal delivery, causing the sleep to be cut short. (Similarly, read() and write() calls may return -1 with errno == EINTR, if they were interrupted by signal delivery.)

If that is a problem, or you are not sure if all your code handles errno == EINTR correctly, or your counters need locking, you can use separate thread dedicated for the signal handling instead.

The dedicated thread will sleep unless a signal is delivered, and only requires a very small stack, so it really does not consume any significant resources at run time.

The target signal is blocked in all threads, with the dedicated thread waiting in sigwaitinfo(). If it catches any signals, it processes them just like above -- except that since this is a thread and not a signal handler per se, you can freely use any locking etc., and do not need to limit yourself to async-signal safe functions.

This threaded approach is slightly longer, adding almost a hundred lines of code to your application. (The differences are contained in the responder() and install_responder() functions; even the code added to main() is exactly the same as in app1.c.)

Here is app2.c:

#define  _POSIX_C_SOURCE 200112L
#include <signal.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <pthread.h>

#include <string.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#define   INFO_SIGNAL (SIGRTMAX-1)

/* This is the counter we're interested in */    
static int counter = 0;

static void *responder(void *payload)
{
    const int signum = (long)payload;
    union sigval response;
    sigset_t sigset;
    siginfo_t info;
    int result;

    /* We wait on only one signal. */
    sigemptyset(&sigset);
    if (sigaddset(&sigset, signum))
        return NULL;

    /* Wait forever. This thread is automatically killed, when the
     * main thread exits. */
    while (1) {

        result = sigwaitinfo(&sigset, &info);
        if (result != signum) {
            if (result != -1 || errno != EINTR)
                return NULL;
            /* A signal was delivered using *this* thread. */
            continue;
        }

        /* We only respond to sigqueue()'d signals. */
        if (info.si_code != SI_QUEUE)
            continue;

        /* Clear response. We don't leak stack data! */
        memset(&response, 0, sizeof response);

        /* Question? */
        switch (info.si_value.sival_int) {

        case 0: /* Counter */
            response.sival_int = *(volatile int *)(&counter);
            break;

        default: /* Unknown; respond with -1. */
            response.sival_int = -1;
        }

        /* Respond. */
        sigqueue(info.si_pid, signum, response);
    }
}

static int install_responder(const int signum)
{
    pthread_t worker_id;
    pthread_attr_t attrs;
    sigset_t mask;
    int retval;

    /* Mask contains only signum. */
    sigemptyset(&mask);
    if (sigaddset(&mask, signum))
        return errno;

    /* Block signum, in all threads. */
    if (sigprocmask(SIG_BLOCK, &mask, NULL))
        return errno;

    /* Start responder() thread with a small stack. */
    pthread_attr_init(&attrs);
    pthread_attr_setstacksize(&attrs, 32768);
    retval = pthread_create(&worker_id, &attrs, responder,
                            (void *)(long)signum);
    pthread_attr_destroy(&attrs);    

    return errno = retval;
}

int main(void)
{
    if (install_responder(INFO_SIGNAL)) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Cannot install responder signal handler: %s.\n",
                        strerror(errno));
        return 1;
    }
    fprintf(stderr, "PID = %d\n", (int)getpid());
    fflush(stderr);

    while (1) {
        struct timespec t;

        counter++;

        if (!(counter % 100)) {
            putchar('.');
            fflush(stdout);
        }

        t.tv_sec = 0;
        t.tv_nsec = 10000000; /* 10ms */
        nanosleep(&t, NULL);
    }

    return 0;
}

For both app1.c and app2.c the application itself is the same. The only modifications needed to the application are making sure all the necessary header files get #included, adding responder() and install_responder(), and a call to install_responder() as early as possible in main().

(app1.c and app2.c only differ in responder() and install_responder(); and in that app2.c needs pthreads.)

Both app1.c and app2.c use the signal SIGRTMAX-1, which should be unused in most applications.

app2.c approach, also has a useful side-effect you might wish to use in general: if you use other signals in your application, but don't want them to interrupt blocking I/O calls et cetera -- perhaps you have a library that was written by a third party, and does not handle EINTR correctly, but you do need to use signals in your application --, you can simply block the signals after the install_responder() call in your application. The only thread, then, where the signals are not blocked is the responder thread, and the kernel will use tat to deliver the signals. Therefore, the only thread that will ever get interrupted by the signal delivery is the responder thread, more specifically sigwaitinfo() in responder(), and it ignores any interruptions. If you use for example async I/O or timers, or this is a heavy math or data processing application, this might be useful.

Both application implementations can be queried using a very simple query program, query.c:

#define _POSIX_C_SOURCE 200112L
#include <unistd.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int query(const pid_t process, const int signum,
          const int question, int *const response)
{
    sigset_t prevmask, waitset;
    struct timespec timeout;
    union sigval value;
    siginfo_t info;
    int result;

    /* Value sent to the target process. */
    value.sival_int = question;

    /* Waitset contains only signum. */
    sigemptyset(&waitset);
    if (sigaddset(&waitset, signum))
        return errno = EINVAL;

    /* Block signum; save old mask into prevmask. */
    if (sigprocmask(SIG_BLOCK, &waitset, &prevmask))
        return errno;

    /* Send the signal. */
    if (sigqueue(process, signum, value)) {
        const int saved_errno = errno;
        sigprocmask(signum, &prevmask, NULL);
        return errno = saved_errno;
    }

    while (1) {

        /* Wait for a response within five seconds. */
        timeout.tv_sec = 5;
        timeout.tv_nsec = 0L;

        /* Set si_code to an uninteresting value,
         * just to be safe. */
        info.si_code = SI_KERNEL;

        result = sigtimedwait(&waitset, &info, &timeout);
        if (result == -1) {
            /* Some other signal delivered? */
            if (errno == EINTR)
                continue;
            /* No response; fail. */
            sigprocmask(SIG_SETMASK, &prevmask, NULL);
            return errno = ETIMEDOUT;
        }

        /* Was this an interesting signal? */
        if (result == signum && info.si_code == SI_QUEUE) {
            if (response)
                *response = info.si_value.sival_int;
            /* Return success. */
            sigprocmask(SIG_SETMASK, &prevmask, NULL);
            return errno = 0;
        }
    }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    pid_t pid;
    int signum, question, response;
    long value;
    char dummy;

    if (argc < 3 || argc > 4 ||
        !strcmp(argv[1], "-h") || !strcmp(argv[1], "--help")) {
        fprintf(stderr, "\n");
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s [ -h | --help ]\n", argv[0]);
        fprintf(stderr, "       %s PID SIGNAL [ QUERY ]\n", argv[0]);
        fprintf(stderr, "\n");
        return 1;
    }

    if (sscanf(argv[1], " %ld %c", &value, &dummy) != 1) {
        fprintf(stderr, "%s: Invalid process ID.\n", argv[1]);
        return 1;
    }
    pid = (pid_t)value;
    if (pid < (pid_t)1 || value != (long)pid) {
        fprintf(stderr, "%s: Invalid process ID.\n", argv[1]);
        return 1;
    }

    if (sscanf(argv[2], "SIGRTMIN %ld %c", &value, &dummy) == 1)
        signum = SIGRTMIN + (int)value;
    else
    if (sscanf(argv[2], "SIGRTMAX %ld %c", &value, &dummy) == 1)
        signum = SIGRTMAX + (int)value;
    else
    if (sscanf(argv[2], " %ld %c", &value, &dummy) == 1)
        signum = value;
    else {
        fprintf(stderr, "%s: Unknown signal.\n", argv[2]);
        return 1;
    }
    if (signum < SIGRTMIN || signum > SIGRTMAX) {
        fprintf(stderr, "%s: Not a realtime signal.\n", argv[2]);
        return 1;
    }

    /* Clear the query union. */
    if (argc > 3) {
        if (sscanf(argv[3], " %d %c", &question, &dummy) != 1) {
            fprintf(stderr, "%s: Invalid query.\n", argv[3]);
            return 1;
        }
    } else
        question = 0;

    if (query(pid, signum, question, &response)) {
        switch (errno) {
        case EINVAL:
            fprintf(stderr, "%s: Invalid signal.\n", argv[2]);
            return 1;
        case EPERM:
            fprintf(stderr, "Signaling that process was not permitted.\n");
            return 1;
        case ESRCH:
            fprintf(stderr, "No such process.\n");
            return 1;
        case ETIMEDOUT:
            fprintf(stderr, "No response.\n");
            return 1;
        default:
            fprintf(stderr, "Failed: %s.\n", strerror(errno));
            return 1;
        }
    }

    printf("%d\n", response);

    return 0;
}

Note that I did not hardcode the signal number here; use SIGRTMAX-1 on the command line for app1.c and app2.c. (You can change it. query.c does understand SIGRTMIN+n too. You must use a realtime signal, SIGRTMIN+0 to SIGRTMAX-0, inclusive.)

You can compile all three programs using

gcc -Wall -O3 app1.c -o app1
gcc -Wall -O3 app2.c -lpthread -o app2
gcc -Wall -O3 query.c -o query

Both ./app1 and ./app2 print their PIDs, so you don't need to look for it. (You can find the PID using e.g. ps -o pid= -C app1 or ps -o pid= -C app2, though.)

If you run ./app1 or ./app2 in one shell (or both in separate shells), you can see them outputting the dots at about once per second. The counter increases every 1/100th of a second. (Press Ctrl+C to stop.)

If you run ./query PID SIGRTMAX-1 in another shell in the same directory on the same machine, you can see the counter value.

An example run on my machine:

A$ ./app1
PID = 28519
...........

B$ ./query 28519 SIGRTMAX-1
11387

C$ ./app2
PID = 28522
...

B$ ./query 28522 SIGRTMAX -1
371

As mentioned, the downside of this mechanism is that the response is limited to one int (or technically an int or a void *). There are ways around that, however, by also using some of the methods Basile Starynkevich outlined. Typically, the signal is then just a notification for the application that it should update the state stored in a file, shared memory segment, or wherever. I recommend using the dedicated thread approach for that, as it has very little overheads, and minimal impact on the application itself.

Any questions?

share|improve this answer

A hard-coded systemtap solution could look like:

% cat FOO.stp
global counts
probe process("/path/to/your/binary").function("CertainFunction") { counts[pid()] <<< 1 }
probe process("/path/to/your/binary").end { println ("pid %d count %sd", pid(), @count(counts[pid()]))
                                            delete counts[pid()] }

# stap FOO.stp
pid 42323 count 112
pid 2123 count 0
... etc, until interrupted
share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks for the responses. There is lots of good information in the other answers. However, here's what I did. First I tweaked the program to add a counter in a shm file:

struct StatsCounter {
    char counterName[8];
    unsigned long int counter;
};
StatsCounter * stats;

void initStatsCounter()
{
    int fd = shm_open("TestStats", O_RDWR|O_CREAT, 0);

    if (fd == -1)
    {
        syslog(priority, "%s:: Initialization Failed", __func__);
        stats = (StatsCounter *) malloc(sizeof(StatsCounter));
    }
    else
    {
        // For now, just one StatsCounter is used, but it could become an array.
        ftruncate(fd, sizeof(StatsCounter));
        stats = (StatsCounter *) mmap(NULL, sizeof(StatsCounter), 
            PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_SHARED, fd, 0);
    }

    // Initialize names. Pad them to 7 chars (save room for \0).
    snprintf(stats[0].counterName, sizeof(stats[0].counterName), "nRespX ");
    stats[0].counter = 0;
}

And changed processServerResponseX to increment stats[0].counter in the locked section. Then I changed the script to parse the shm file with "hexdump":

hexdump /dev/shm/TestStats -e ' 1/8 "%s " 1/8 "%d\n"'

This will then show something like this:

nRespX  23

This way I can extend this later if I want to also look at response Y, ...

Not sure if there are mutual exclusion problems with hexdump if it accessed the file while it was being changed. But in my case, I don't think it matters, because the script only calls it before and after the test, it should not be in the middle of an update.

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