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What is the pythonic way of writing a unittest to see if a module is properly installed? By properly installed I mean, it does not raise an ImportError: No module named foo.

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Generally, there's not a lot to unit test. Do you not trust the import statement? The import line of code is so simple -- and so easy to inspect -- that it seems a bit silly to unit test it. Why are you unit testing the import statement? –  S.Lott Mar 4 '10 at 17:57
    
As I have to deploy my Django application on a different server and it requires some extra modules I want to make sure that all required modules are installed. For example, making sure that simplejson is installed for python 2.5. Of course I trust the import statement, I just don't want to forget installing a module I need. –  DrDee Mar 4 '10 at 18:18
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Seems like You're running tests on production environment, which is...strange. Anyway, you're testing that you have proper dependencies, which is a job for package manager. Either create packages for your application, or use pythonic dependency managers (pip and pip install -r requirements.txt in virtualenv comes to mind). –  Almad Mar 4 '10 at 18:37
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As I have to deploy my Django application on a different server and it requires some extra modules I want to make sure that all required modules are installed.

This is not a unit test scenario at all.

This is a production readiness process and it isn't -- technically -- a test of your application.

It's a query about the environment. Ours includes dozens of things.

Start with a simple script like this. Add each thing you need to be sure exists.

try:
    import simplejson
except ImportError:
    print "***FAILURE: simplejson missing***"
    sys.exit( 2 )
sys.exit( 0 )

Just run this script in each environment as part of installation. It's not a unit test at all. It's a precondition for setup install.

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Thanks so much, and sorry for using the wrong terminology, it obviously put a whole bunch of people on the wrong foot :) –  DrDee Mar 4 '10 at 19:00
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I don't see why you'd need to test this, but something like:

def my_import_test(self):
    import my_module

If an import error is raised the test has failed, if not it passes.

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Maybe I am not clear in what I need. I want to test whether the import of a module is successful or not so I can see what modules are missing and need to be installed. So how can I use an self.assertUnequals... statement –  DrDee Mar 4 '10 at 18:42
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