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I have a data frame consisting of 10299 observations of 66 variables. Some of these variables share a common column name, and I would like to calculate the mean of those variables for each observation.

Having the following matrix, with column names c(A, B, C, B, A ,C)

A B C B A C                             
1 2 3 4 5 6         
3 5 6 7 4 3                             
3 3 3 3 5 5                             
2 2 2 2 2 2

I would like to get:

A   B   C    
3   3   4.5
3.5 6   4.5
4   3   4
2   2   2

I tried for loops, the command aggregate() but I don't get the desired result.

Sorry if the question seems too basic, I have checked google for possible solutions but I didn't find any.

share|improve this question
    
How did you get a data.frame where two columns can have the same name? – John Paul May 22 '14 at 19:40
    
Colnames were stablished by using colnames() and a string vector from another file. – user2500444 May 22 '14 at 19:43
    
maybe transpose and then aggregate by group (where groups are A, B, C)? – beetroot May 22 '14 at 19:46
1  
@JohnPaul: only row.names must be unique.. – gagolews May 22 '14 at 20:27

Here's a solution.

First let's define an exemplary data.frame (the same as in your example).

df <- as.data.frame(
    matrix(c(1,3,3,2,2,5,3,2,3,6,3,2,4,7,3,2,5,4,5,2,6,3,5,2),
        ncol=6,
        dimnames=list(NULL, c("A", "B", "C", "B", "A", "C"))
    )
  )

Below we apply a custom function on each unique column name, col: it selects all the columns named col and calculates rowMeans. The result, list of atomic vectors, will be coerced to a data.frame:

res <- as.data.frame( # sapply returns a list here, so we convert it to a data.frame
    sapply(unique(names(df)), # for each unique column name
       function(col) rowMeans(df[names(df) == col]) # calculate row means
    )
  )

The result:

res
##     A B   C
## 1 3.0 3 4.5
## 2 3.5 6 4.5
## 3 4.0 3 4.0
## 4 2.0 2 2.0

EDIT: As there are many solutions proposed already, let's benchmark them:

set.seed(123)
df <- as.data.frame(matrix(sample(1:9, replace=TRUE, 10000*100),
   dimnames=list(NULL, sample(LETTERS[1:5], 100, replace=TRUE)), ncol=100))
library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(...)
## Unit: milliseconds
##                   min         lq     median         uq        max neval
## @gagolews   61.196075   65.73211   77.22533  119.42028  127.32557    10
## @joran       8.297964   10.05242   10.90564   15.25943   65.69156    10
## @Davide   5535.272680 5731.24220 5754.67006 5808.47807 5862.22628    10

The clear winner (at least as far as speed is concerned) is @joran's lapply+split+Reduce. Congrats! :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Your solution maintains the rownames, whereas joran's drops them (easy enough to re-assign at the end, but the time spent re-assigning them ought to be in the benchmark, for fairness). (Davide's solution also maintains rownames.) – Darren Cook Apr 20 at 9:04

This works but isn't as nice as gegolews solution, in my opinion:

x <- read.table(text = "A B C B A C                             
 1 2 3 4 5 6         
 3 5 6 7 4 3                             
 3 3 3 3 5 5                             
 2 2 2 2 2 2",header = TRUE,sep = "",check.names = FALSE)

as.data.frame(lapply(split(as.list(x),f = colnames(x)),function(x) Reduce(`+`,x) / length(x)))
##    A B   C
##1 3.0 3 4.5
##2 3.5 6 4.5
##3 4.0 3 4.0
##4 2.0 2 2.0
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for speed! (benchmarks added) – gagolews May 22 '14 at 20:24

Using a combination of apply and tapply:

t(apply(df, 1, function(x) tapply(x, colnames(df), mean)))

#        A B   C
# [1,] 3.0 3 4.5
# [2,] 3.5 6 4.5
# [3,] 4.0 3 4.0
# [4,] 2.0 2 2.0
share|improve this answer
    
Simply clever. Thank you very much. – user2500444 May 22 '14 at 20:09
    
you're welcome :) – Davide Passaretti May 22 '14 at 20:11

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