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I have two php files. I would like to instantiate the a class from the first file in a class in the second file. Essentially make several classes and the use another file to access their methods. I'm new-ish to php and I'm having some trouble. the files I'm using would more than likely be in the same directory but if they aren't are there any issues there. I was hoping someone could help me out.

Thanks!

sample code looks like this:

File path = somePath/someDirectory/aFolder/FooClass.php

<?php
    class FooClass {
        public function __construct () {}
        public $Foo = "oof";
        public function getFoo () {
            return $this->Foo;
        }
        public function setFoo ($Foo) {
            $this->Foo = $Foo;
        }
    }
?>

file path = anotherPath/anotherDirectory/anotherFolder/BarClass.php

<?php
    require($lib . '/Library/WebServer/someDirectory/src/aFolder/FooClass.php');
    class BarClass {
        public function __construct () {}
        $f = new FooClass();
        public $Bar = "rab";
        public function getBar () {
            return $this->Bar;
        }
        public function setBar ($Bar) {
            $this->Bar = $Bar;
        }
    }
    $b = new BarClass();
    echo $b->f->getFoo() . "<br>";
?>
share|improve this question
1  
What does I'm having some trouble mean exactly? –  jeroen May 22 '14 at 21:03
    
I'm not having trouble understanding the proper way to instantiate classes and I am not able to access the methods and instance variables the way I expect. I'm coming from java. –  demuro1 May 22 '14 at 21:10
    
You should enable error display as your code will generate various errors. Put this at the top of the main script: ini_set('display_errors',1); error_reporting(E_ALL | E_STRICT); –  jeroen May 22 '14 at 21:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One of the problems I can see, is that you are using an expression to define your $f property. You cannot do that in php. According to the manual:

They are defined by using one of the keywords public, protected, or private, followed by a normal variable declaration. This declaration may include an initialization, but this initialization must be a constant value--that is, it must be able to be evaluated at compile time and must not depend on run-time information in order to be evaluated.

You would need something like:

class BarClass {

    public $f;

    public function __construct(){
        $this->f = new FooClass();  
    }

    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
this solved it for me thanks so much –  demuro1 May 22 '14 at 21:48

In your code $f has no access visibility set, so it's set to private by default.

To get access to it outside of class BarClass, you need to declare it outside of __construct and set it to be public.

class BarClass {
  public $f;
  public function __construct() {
    $this->f = new FooClass();
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's what I thought at first, but the OP's constructor is actually empty. Your code does solve the / one problem however :-) –  jeroen May 22 '14 at 21:12
    
@jeroen oops! Edited the answer to correct the mistake. –  iblamefish May 22 '14 at 21:14
    
thanks for the help –  demuro1 May 22 '14 at 21:49

but if the files aren't in the same directories are there any issues

No.

Because you are using absolute paths for require:

require($lib.'/Library/WebServer/someDirectory/src/aFolder/FooClass.php');

Since you are just starting out with PHP, I would encourage you to read about autoloading and take a look at using Composer to include one to your codebase.

share|improve this answer
    
Super awesome. I appreciate the response. I'll check out the links right now. Thanks for the suggestion! –  demuro1 May 22 '14 at 21:49

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