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What are the worst practices you actually found in Java code?

Mine are:

  • using instance variables in servlets (it's not just bad practice but bug, actually)
  • using Collection implementations like HashMap, and not using the appropriate interfaces
  • using seemingly cryptic class names like SmsMaker (SmsFactory) or CommEnvironment (CommunicationContext)
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closed as primarily opinion-based by Lukas Eder, Richard Tingle, bummi, ArtB, CoverosGene Nov 1 '13 at 15:14

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Simply using instance variables in servlets is not a bug or bad practice. Altering the variables after initialization of a servlet may be a bug (it depends on what those variables represent), and is bad practice, but just using instance variables in servlets is not bad practice. –  MetroidFan2002 Oct 26 '08 at 18:22
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31 Answers

up vote 78 down vote accepted

I had to maintain java code, where most of the Exception handling was like:

catch( Exception e ) {}
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13  
People also do: catch(Exception e){ // will not happen } :) –  jb. Oct 26 '08 at 20:08
21  
Unfortunately, my current project has done worse: catch(Throwable th) { logger.log("something went wrong"); } –  Alan Oct 27 '08 at 1:23
4  
Hey that's pretty common in C# code as well. –  Daud Ahmad Oct 28 '08 at 6:09
8  
I admit, while using Oracle's JDBC stuff, that I've written catch (SQLException ex) { /* What could possible be thrown here? */ } when closing a connection. –  Powerlord Oct 29 '08 at 18:44
4  
Java quite often requires you to catch an exception that can never happen. For example, an IOException reading from a ByteArrayInputStream - assuming you are in control of the creation of said ByteArrayInputStream. –  slim Oct 1 '09 at 10:19
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Once I encountered 'singleton' exception:

class Singletons {
    public static final MyException myException = new MyException();
}

class Test {
    public void doSomething() throws MyException {
        throw Singletons.myException;
    }
}

Same instance of exception was thrown each time ... with exact same stacktrace, which had nothing to do with real code flow :-(

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2  
This came up for consideration recently in a discussion I was part of. (And I grimaced.) :o –  280Z28 Aug 3 '09 at 6:50
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I hate it when people create interfaces just for hanging a set of constants on:

public interface InterfaceAntiPattern {
  boolean BAD_IDEA = true;
  int THIS_SUCKS = 1;
}

—Interfaces are for specifying behavioural contracts, not a convenience mechanism for including constants.

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3  
Static imports were introduced in Java 5 and I don't see what they have to do with this point. –  John Topley Aug 2 '09 at 16:41
3  
Math is a concrete class not an interface, so Math.PI is not an example of this anti-pattern. –  John Topley Aug 3 '09 at 11:11
4  
What static imports have to do with this point is that they allow you the convenience of just saying if (BAD_IDEA) rather than if (ConstantsClassPattern.BAD_IDEA), without having to extend InterfaceAntiPattern. –  David Moles Aug 4 '09 at 8:57
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Six really bad examples;

  • instead of error reporting, just System.exit without warning. e.g. if(properties.size()>10000) System.exit(0); buried deep in a library.
  • using string constants as locks. e.g. synchronized("one") { }
  • locking on a mutable field. e.g. synchronized(object) { object = ...; }
  • initializing static fields in the constructor.
  • Triggering an exception just to get a stack trace. e.g. try { Integer i = null; i.intValue(); } catch(NullPointerException e) { e.printStackTrace(); }
  • Pointless object creation e.g. new Integer(text).intValue() or worse new Integer(0).getClass()
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5  
Oh my brain.... –  280Z28 Aug 3 '09 at 6:44
3  
+1 for comedy value even though I've been lucky enough never to see any of these in production code –  finnw Aug 3 '09 at 7:00
2  
I still don't know what is wrong with having 10000 properties. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Aug 5 '09 at 18:35
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Not related strictly to Java, but calling an expensive function over and over instead of storing the result, when you know it won't change. Example:

if (expensiveFunction() > aVar)
    aVar = expensiveFunction();
for (int i=0; i < expensiveFunction(); ++i)
    System.out.println(expensiveFunction());
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3  
how is it easier then using variable with value that was returned by that function? i.e. one line vs X lines... –  dusoft Aug 2 '09 at 16:19
3  
You have to be totally sure that the result of the method is not changing. If the method changes and therefor the result changes more often then thought while writing the depending method your code breaks without you knowing why. If you want to cache do it in the called expensive method. There you know if the result is changing. –  Janusz Aug 2 '09 at 18:29
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if{
 if{
  if{
   if{
    if{
     if{
      if{
       if{
         ....
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11  
}}} else { ... –  Carlos Heuberger Aug 3 '09 at 15:03
3  
On a related note, using ifs instead of if-elses: if (i==1) {} if (i==2) {} instead of if (i==1) {} else if (i==2) {} –  dogbane Oct 1 '09 at 10:35
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The worst Java practice that encompasses almost all others: Global mutable state.

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1  
or any mutable state if you could've used an immutable state –  RAY Jan 6 '11 at 6:21
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Ridiculous OO mania with class hierachies 10+ levels deep.

This is where names like DefaultConcreteMutableAbstractWhizzBangImpl come from. Just try debugging that kind of code - you'll be whizzing up and down the class tree for hours.

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Subclassing when you're not supposed to, e.g. instead of using composition, aggregation, etc.

Edit: This is a special case of the hammer.

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Our intern used static modifier to store currently logged user in Seam application.

 class Identity{
    ...
    public static User user; 
    ...
 }

 class foo{

    void bar(){
       someEntity.setCreator(Identity.user); 
    }

 }

Of course it worked when he tested it :)

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3  
Interns are there to learn, so I guess it is forgivable. Hopefully he won't do it again! –  TM. Oct 26 '08 at 18:26
5  
I have done this! My only saving grace is that I was a student, and while the people grading my work didn't catch my mistake, I did figure it out on my next project. –  Athena Oct 27 '08 at 1:05
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saw something like this:

public static boolean isNull(int value) {
    Integer integer = new Integer(value);

    if(integer == null) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

They had a similar method for longs.

I presume they had originally done something like

if(value == null) {

and got a compile error and still didn't realise that primitive values couldn't be null.

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Abstracting functionality out into a library class which will never be re-used as it's so specific to the original problem being solved. Hence ending up with a gazillion library classes which no-one will ever use and which completely obscure the two useful utilities you actually do have (i.e. CollectionUtils and IOUtils).

...pauses for breath...

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I once had to investigate a web application where ALL state was kept in the web page sent to the client, and no state in the web server.

Scales well though :)

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1  
For bonus points, also send user credentials to the browser. –  finnw Aug 3 '09 at 6:58
3  
Hey, it's RESTful! –  David Moles Aug 4 '09 at 8:58
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Not closing database connections, file handles etc in a finally{}

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An API that requires the caller to do:

Foobar f = new Foobar(foobar_id);
f = f.retrieve();

Any of the following would have been better:

Foobar f = Foobar.retrieve(foobar_id);

or

Foobar f = new Foobar(foobar_id); // implicit retrieve

or

Foobar f = new Foobar();
f.retrieve(foobar_id); // but not f = ...
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Creating acessors and mutators for all private variables, without stopping to think, sometimes automatically.

Encapsulation was invented for a reason.

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Overkill abstraction of object oriented design (Deleted so 10k only).

Same answer on a similar thread (applies to all languages which permit object oriented design).

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Not thinking like a programmer should.

After prolonged exposure, Java does that to some people.

Why? My opinion is that it's because there's too much Intellisense and no sense. It lets you do stupid things so quickly that people don't stop to think.

Example 1:

boolean negate( boolean shouldNegate, boolean value ) {
  return (shouldNegate?(!value):value;
}

which, of course is the same as value ^ shouldNegate, a simple XOR.

Example 2: (I swear I'm not making this up)

boolean isNotNull( Object o ) {
  return o != null;
}

Both with additional 4-6 lines of Javadoc, explaining what those methods did.

Example 3:

/**
*
*
*/

An empty Javadoc, to make those annoying Eclipse "missing Javadoc" warnings go away.

Example 3b:

/**
* A constructor. Takes no parameters and creates a new instance of MyClass.
*/
public MyClass() {
}
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@madlep Exactly! Parts of the Java community really goes overboard with extreme abstractions and crazily deep class hierarchies. Steve Yegge had a good blog post about it a couple of years back: Execution in the Kingdom of Nouns.

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My favorite sorting algorithm, courtesy of the gray beard brigade:

List needsToBeSorted = new List ();
...blah blah blah...

Set sorted = new TreeSet ();
for (int i = 0; i < needsToBeSorted; i++)
  sorted.add (needsToBeSorted.get (i));

needsToBeSorted.clear ();
for (Iterator i = sorted.iterator (); i.hasNext ();)
  needsToBeSorted.add (i.next ());

Admittedly it worked but eventually I prevailed upon him that perhaps Collections.sort would be a lot easier.

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In File I/O: incorrect use of try-catch block.

try {
   /* open file */
}
catch(Exception e) {
  e.printStackTrace();
}

try {
   /* read file content */
}
catch (Exception e) {
  e.printStackTrace();
}

try {
   /* close the file */
}
catch (Exception e) {
  e.printStackTrace();
}
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Similar to yours, but taken a step further:

Use of class (static) variables when a request scoped variable was the correct thing to do in a Struts action. :O

This was actually deployed in production for a few months, and no one ever noticed a thing until I was reviewing the code one day.

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1  
We had a problem like that lead to a situation where only one user could press the 'Submit' button at a time without getting a stack trace. Luckily the users were internal and eventually somebody on the dev team asked the professional services guys why the kept yelling over the cube wall "Fire in the hole!" –  David Moles Aug 4 '09 at 9:00
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Excesive focuse on re-using objects that leads to static things everywhere. (Said re-using can be very helpfull in some situation).

Java has GC build-in, if you need an object, create a new one.

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Defining the logic using exceptions where a for-loop or any form of loop would suffice.

Example:

while(i < MAX_VALUE)
{
   try
   {
      while(true)
      {
         array[j] = //some operation on the array;
         j++;  

      }
   }
   catch(Exception e)
   {
      j = 0;
   }
}

Serious, I know the guy who wrote this code. I reviewed it and corrected the code :)

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I saw this line a couple of minutes ago:

Short result = new Short(new Integer(new Double(d).intValue()).shortValue());
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Here is a cropped sample from an actual applet i was to maintain it took me forever to realize what is was doing.

int sval, eval, stepv, i;
double d;
                if (/*someCondition*/)
                    {
                    sval = 360;//(all values multiplied by 20)
                    eval = -271;
                    stepv = -10;
                    }
                else if (/*someCondition*/)
                    {
                    sval = 320;
                    eval = -601;
                    stepv = -10;
                    }
                else if (/*someCondition*/)
                    {
                    sval = 0;
                    eval = -311;
                    stepv = -10;

                    }
                    else
                    {
                    sval = 360;
                    eval = -601;
                    stepv = -10;
                    }
                for (i = sval; i > eval; i = i + stepv)
                    {
                    d = i;
                    d = d / 20.0;
                    //do some more stuff in loop
                    }

turns out he wanted to iterate by .5 over the loop and thats not a pasting error, that is the indentation scheme

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A mistake made by junior programmers: unnecessarily using member variables instead of local variables.

A Java EE example:

Starting threads in servlets or EJBs (for example to start asynchronous processing tasks).

This breaks the scalability of your Java EE app. You're not supposed to mess with threading in Java EE components, because the app server is supposed to manage that for you.

We refactored this by having the servlet put a message on a JMS queue and writing a message-driven bean to handle the asynchronous processing task.

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I think this one for me must be a record. A class is used for building a complex data model for the front end involving filtering. so the method that returns the list of objects goes something like this:

    public DataObjectList (GenerateList (massive signature involving 14 parameters, three of which are collections and one is a collection of collections) 
try { 

250 lines of code to retrieve the data which calls a stored proc that parses some of it and basically contains GUI logic

 } catch (Exception e) {
            return new DataObjectList(e, filterFields);
        }

So I got here because I was wondering how come the following calling method was failing and I couldn't see where the Exception field was being set.

DataObjectList dataObjectList= EntireSystemObject.getDataObjectList Generator().generateDataObjectList (viewAsUserCode, processedDataRowHandler, folderQuery, pageNumber, listCount, sortColumns, sortDirections, groupField, filters, firstRun, false, false, resetView);

dataObjectList.setData(processedDataRowHandler.getData());

if (dataObjectList.getErrorException() == null) {

do stuff for GUI, I think, put lots of things into maps ... 250 lines or so

       }
            return dataObjectList;
        } else {

put a blank version into the GUI and then  

            throw new DWRErrorException("List failed due to list generation error", "list failed due to list generation error for folder: " + folderID + ", column: " + columnID, List.getErrorException(), ListInfo);
        }

All with me so far?

Well at least they did tell us in the front end that something did actually go wrong!

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AbstractSpringBeanFactoryFactoryFacadeMutatorBeanFactory. I can't stand this over-engineered, incomprehensible BS. Benji Smith puts it a bit more elegantly.

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Converting a naked XML message (without XSD/namespaces) into a DataObject:

DataObject operation_file = boFactory....

try{operation_file.setString("file_name", Constants.getTagValue("file_name", eElementOp));}catch (Exception e){operation_file.setString("file_name","");}
try{operation_file.setDate("proposed_execution_date", sdf.parse(Constants.getTagValue("proposed_execution_date", eElementOp)));}catch (Exception e){operation_file.setString("proposed_execution_date",null);}
try{operation_file.setString("instructions", Constants.getTagValue("instructions", eElementOp));}catch (Exception e){operation_file.setString("instructions","");}
try{operation_file.setString("description", Constants.getTagValue("description", eElementOp));}catch (Exception e){operation_file.setString("description","");}

I've called it the try-catch oriented programming (tcop)...

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