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Let's say I have a Class called Task.

class Task
    attr_accessor :task_name, :start, :end

    def initialize(*args)
        length = args.length
        case length
        when 0
            puts "Task Created."
        when 1
            @task_name = args[0]
            puts "Task Created."
        when 3
            @task_name = args[0]
            @start = args[1]
            @end = args[2]
            puts "Task Created."
        else
            puts "Incorrect input" 
        end
    end
end

I want to ask a few questions about this implementation:

  • Does this properly handle all possible initialization parameters, or is there a weakness within the case statement?
  • If I were to try to create an object with two parameters, the expected output would be "Incorrect Input". Even though I never set any attribute of it, the object would still be created (right?). Is there any way to prevent the object from being created if an illegal amount of parameters were sent through?
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can prevent the creation of the object by raising an error, most commonly this would be an ArgumentError. I like it when the arguments are written out in the method signature, so I would do it this way:

def initialize(task_name = nil, start = nil, end = nil)
  unless [start, end].all?(&:nil?) || [start, end].none?(&:nil?)
    raise ArgumentError, 'provide both start and end or none'
  end

  @task_name = task_name
  @start = start
  @end = end
end

The cool thing is, you get an ArgumentError for free when you pass to many parameters. The if condition could also be written shorter, since it is essentially a XOR. However I think it is less understandable:

def initialize(task_name = nil, start = nil, end = nil)
  if start.nil? != end.nil?
    raise ArgumentError, 'provide both start and end or none'
  end

  @task_name = task_name
  @start = start
  @end = end
end
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Don't use "new", use another class method that calls "new" if the arguments are valid

class Task
    attr_accessor :task_name, :start, :end
    def initialize(*args)
        @task_name = args[0]
        @start = args[1]
        @end = args[2]
        puts "Task Created."
    end
    def self.fabricate(*args)
        if [0, 1, 3].include?(args.length)
           return new(*args)
        else
           puts "incorrect input"
           return nil
        end
    end
end

result = Task.fabricate("job", 5, 7)
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To answer your question, you need to understand how new method works. If it was written in ruby it would look like this:

class Class
  def self.new(args*)
    object = allocate
    object.initialize(*args)
    object
  end
end

allocate method is responsible for creating a new object in ruby's memory heap slab. When object is allocated, initialize method is executed against this object and the object itself is returned.

So how to prevent new object from being returned? - raise an exception in initialize!

You can do it simply with:

class Task
  attr_accessor :task_name, :start, :end

  def initialize(*args)
    raise ArgumentError, "wrong number of arguments (#{args.length} for 0,1 or 3" unless [0,1,3].include?(args.length)
    @task_name, @start, @end = args 
  end

end
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