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I wonder how to get something like this

1 write

copy(a,b,2,3)

2 and then get,

a[2]=b[2]; 
a[3]=b[3];
a[4]=b[4];

I know that C #defines can't be used recursively to get that effect, so I suppose that template meta-programming is in place.

I know there is a boost library for that, but I only want that "simple" trick, and boost is too "messy".

Thank you

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3  
Are your before and after measurements of performance different enough that this is the place to focus your efforts? –  Bill Mar 4 '10 at 19:38
    
check this stackoverflow.com/questions/2380143/… –  Andrey Mar 4 '10 at 19:39
8  
@Bill: yeah, because we wouldn't want people just going around learning techniques for the sake of "education" or "curiosity" ;-) –  Steve Jessop Mar 4 '10 at 19:46
    
actually you can accomplish this using boost preprocessor. I did something similar to implement python unpack semantics in C++, i.e. unpack((const int a,b,c), abcd); –  Anycorn Mar 4 '10 at 19:56
    
The motivation is both for education and curiosity, so I would like to get the source code for that, not using the boost lib. –  cibercitizen1 Mar 4 '10 at 20:10

11 Answers 11

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The most straight forward solution to this is to write a loop where the start and end values are known

for(int i = 2; i <= 4; i++) {
  a[i]=b[i]; 
}

I think this is better than any sort of template/runtime-call mixture: The loop as written is completely clear to the compilers' optimizer, and there are no levels of function calls to dig through just to see what's going on.

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4  
Plus, many compilers will unroll this loop when optimization is turned on. –  John Dibling Mar 4 '10 at 20:37
    
Yes I agree ! And it is trivial to write a define to be used like copy(a,b,2,4) –  cibercitizen1 Mar 4 '10 at 22:35
13  
This is the accepted answer? "how to unroll a loop with templates" and the answer is don't even try? Maybe you're compiler will unroll this but not all. –  Inverse Feb 13 '11 at 6:51
    
@Inverse a compiler that cannot unroll this also cannot inline function calls that result from the various template solutions presented. I did try, and this is what I came up, which I believe yields to loop unrolling. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 13 '11 at 22:12
    
That's cool. I was hoping for a general solution to better control unrolling in the general case. I thought you were being snarky for some reason ;) but it is fine for a fixed loop. –  Inverse Feb 14 '11 at 4:59

C++ meta-programming is recursive. Think of your problem in terms of recursion, implement terminal case and non-terminal cases. Your terminal case can be either 0 or one. pass limits as template parameters. use structure/class because they allow partial specialization and other neat things.

template<int from, int to>
struct copy {
static void apply(source, destination) {
  source[from] = destination[from];
  copy<from+1,to>:: apply(source, destination);
}
};

// terminal case
template<int from>
struct copy<from, from> {
static void apply(source, destination) {
  source[from] = destination[from];
}
};
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1  
source and destination need to be declared; this doesn't compile as it stands. –  Charles Bailey Mar 4 '10 at 20:41
1  
Hey, that's the same code I gave in my question: stackoverflow.com/questions/2380143/… Does it means, this is the only way to do it using templates. –  cibercitizen1 Mar 4 '10 at 22:33

You can probably do something like the following. Depending on your compiler and the optimziation settings that you use you may get the effect that you are looking for.

Be aware that for small objects like char it may well be slower than a std::copy or a memcpy and that for larger objects the cost of a loop is likely to be insignificant compared to the copies going on in any case.

#include <cstddef>

template<std::size_t base, std::size_t count, class T, class U>
struct copy_helper
{
    static void copy(T dst, U src)
    {
        dst[base] = src[base];
        copy_helper<base + 1, count - 1, T, U>::copy(dst, src);
    }
};

template<std::size_t base, class T, class U>
struct copy_helper<base, 0, T, U>
{
    static void copy(T, U)
    {
    }
};

template<std::size_t base, std::size_t count, class T, class U>
void copy(T dst, U src)
{
    copy_helper<base, count, T, U>::copy(dst, src);
}

template void copy<5, 9, char*, const char*>(char*, const char*);

#include <iostream>
#include <ostream>

int main()
{
    const char test2[] = "     , World\n";
    char test[14] = "Hello";

    copy<5, 9>(test, test2);

    std::cout << test;

    return 0;
}
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Hey, that's the same code I gave in my question: stackoverflow.com/questions/2380143/… Does it means, this is the only way to do it using templates? I'm starting to believe so. –  cibercitizen1 Mar 4 '10 at 22:37
    
@cibercitizen1: I wrote this independently, but to a well known pattern. –  Charles Bailey Mar 4 '10 at 22:56

Obligatory reference to Duff's Device

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Duff's device is overrated. All it does is save you writing the post-processing loop. It does not automatically unroll arbitrary amounts. –  Z boson Sep 4 at 9:17
    
Overrated? Duff's device is obsolete. I'm sure modern compiler's optimizers choke on it. Did you not see "obligatory"? Every programmer of C should know of Duff's device. No one should actually use it. It is not common idiomatic code. It's value is in getting C programmers to truly understand what switch statements can do. –  jmucchiello Sep 8 at 0:03
    
Is is obsolete on embedded systems? I thought maybe it could still be used to save a few instructions since it takes care of the post processing loop. Of course the compiler may end up producing more complication code to compile duff's device anyway. I don't know. But that's the only case I can think of where it would might be useful in practice. –  Z boson Sep 8 at 7:01
    
@Z boson, I would still find the maintenance aspect of duff's device higher than the couple of code bytes it might safe especially years later when someone might be encountering duff's device for the first time in your code. –  jmucchiello Sep 15 at 20:51

From http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl/Vector.html:

template <class InputIterator>
vector(InputIterator, InputIterator)

Creates a vector with a copy of a range. 

Does this do the job?

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2  
I'm sorry, but no. I'm looking for something as close as possible to a search -copy(a,b,2,3)- and replace by a[2]=b[2]; a[3]=b[3]; a[4]=b[4]; –  cibercitizen1 Mar 4 '10 at 20:17

It's important to realize that the compiler is very smart, and that tricking it to unroll loops using template metaprogramming will probably set you back further that it gets you forward.

To get the bottom out of your optimizations: keep an eye on the disassembly. This will hopefully teach you more than throwing templates at the problem.

And note, like Johannes said: if the compiler can see that you are running a loop for a fixed number of times (or a fixed multiple of times like 4x variable), it can create code very close to optimal.

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It doesn't use templates and it's not a "complete" unrolling, but you can partially unroll the loop with something like this:

void copy (SomeType* a, SomeType* b, int start_index, int num_items) {
    int i = start_index;

    while (num_items > 4) {
            a[i+0] = b[i+0];
            a[i+1] = b[i+1];
            a[i+2] = b[i+2];
            a[i+3] = b[i+3];
            i += 4;
            num_items -= 4;
    }
    while (num_items > 0) {
            a[i] = b[i];
            ++i;
            --num_items;
    }
}

Now in this particular example, the extra computations involved will probably outweigh the benefits from only unrolling four elements at a time. You should get an increasing benefit from an increasing number of elements inside the top loop (throughout the function, replace 4 with however many elements you are copying inside each manually-unrolled iteration).

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template <int begin, int end> struct copy_;

template <int end> struct copy_<end, end> {
  template <typename T> static void execute(T& a, T& b)
  {
    a[end] = b[end];
  }
};

template <int begin, int end> struct copy_<begin, end> {
  template <typename T> static void execute(T& a, T& b)
  {
    a[begin] = b[begin];
    copy_<begin+1, end>::execute(a, b);
  }
};

template <int begin, int how_many> struct copy {
  template <typename T> static void execute(T& a, T& b)
  {
    copy_<begin, begin+how_many-1>::execute(a, b);
  }
};

copy<2, 3>::execute(a, b);
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Hey, that's the same code I gave in my question: stackoverflow.com/questions/2380143/… Does it means, this is the only way to do it using templates? This is the 3rd code in that direction, so it seems clear. –  cibercitizen1 Mar 4 '10 at 22:39
    
@cibercitizen1 Na, all it means is people are too lazy to do anything but a search and make a question out of the answer.... –  Archival Oct 21 '12 at 13:43

Incidentally, the boost preprocessor library has something very similar to what you want: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_37_0/libs/preprocessor/doc/examples/duffs_device.c

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Loop unrolloing using meta-programming can be used to create constexpr (I have not measured times). I have an example where it can be used to make the function combination(n, k) a cosntexpr:

template <size_t N> struct iterate_forward { template <class operation> static auto eval(const operation & op) { iterate_forward<N-1>::eval(op); return op(N-1); } }; template <> struct iterate_forward<1> { template <class operation> static auto eval(const operation & op) { return op(0); } }; template <> struct iterate_forward<0> { template <class operation> static auto eval(const operation & op) {} }; template <size_t N, size_t K> constexpr size_t COMB() { struct ratio { size_t operator () (size_t i) const { return (res *= (N-i) / (i+1)); } mutable size_t res = 1; }; return iterate_forward<K>::eval(ratio()); }

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Andrey's link has all the details. You should be asking yourself, "Why do I want to do this? Do I think I'm smarter than the compiler when it comes to optimization?" (The answer is no.)

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6  
In my experience with loop unrolling, the answer is frequently yes. Or actually not smarter than the compiler, but better able to experiment with different possibilities and pick the best. If your compiler can use profiler results to make unrolling decisions, that helps a bit. You do have to be careful not to pick the best result for a toy benchmark program, and then use it in a real program, though, or you'll unroll too far. –  Steve Jessop Mar 4 '10 at 19:48
    
@Steve: Why? I just want to learn if that is possible, and how, if so. Even if the compiler is just smarter than me (I know it is!) –  cibercitizen1 Mar 4 '10 at 20:39
2  
Unrolling is a complex trade-off. Reducing branches and jumps normally speeds up the code, even on modern processors. Increasing the size of the code means it occupies more cache, which hurts performance in unpredictable ways. Compilers tend to be fairly conservative about unrolling, especially when the number of iterations is variable. I'd guess there are usually better performance gains for the same amount of code bloat by inlining. So especially without profiler data, the compiler misses opportunities that you can find by hand, unrolling the loops that you know run longest. –  Steve Jessop Mar 5 '10 at 11:29
    
Of course whether it's worth the programmer effort is beyond the scope of the question. That's why I wouldn't necessarily call manual unrolling "smart", but it certainly can make the code run faster. –  Steve Jessop Mar 5 '10 at 11:31

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