Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a directory config with the following file listing:

$ ls config
file one
file two
file three

I want a bash script that will, when given no arguments, iterate over all those files; when given names of files as arguments, I want it to iterate over the named files.

#!/bin/sh
for file in ${@:-config/*}
do
    echo "Processing '$file'"
done

As above, with no quotes around the list term in the for loop, it produces the expected output in the no-argument case, but breaks when you pass an argument (it splits the file names on spaces.) Quoting the list term (for file in "${@:-config/*}") works when I pass file names, but fails to expand the glob if I don't.

Is there a way to get both cases to work?

share|improve this question
    
@Jidder Do the filenames you supplied as arguments have spaces in the names? –  Barmar May 23 '14 at 8:52
    
Yeah, that's the critical thing, the file names have spaces; passing script.sh "config/file one" "config/file three" breaks it without the quotes around the list term. –  Robert Atkins May 23 '14 at 8:53
    
@Jidder He is. But unless you quote "$@" inside the script, they get split on whitespace in the loop. –  Barmar May 23 '14 at 8:54
    
@jidder I already did this. Try it yourself. –  Robert Atkins May 23 '14 at 8:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Put the processing code in a function, and then use different loops to call it:

if [ $# -eq 0 ]
then for file in config/*
    do processing_func "$file"
done
else for file in "$@"
    do processing_func "$file"
done
fi
share|improve this answer

For a simpler solution, just modify your IFS variable

#!/bin/bash
IFS=''
for file in ${@:-config/*}
do
    echo "Processing '$file'"
done
IFS=$' \n\t'

The $IFS is a default shell variable that lists all the separators used by the shell. If you remove the space from this list, the shell won't split on space anymore. You should set it back to its default value after you function so that it doesn't cause other functions to misbehave later in your script

NOTE: This seems to misbehave with dash (I used a debian, and #!/bin/sh links to dash). If you use an empty $IFS, args passed will be returned as only 1 file. However, if you put some random value (i.e. IFS=':'), the behaviour will be the one you wanted (except if there is a : in your files name)

This works fine with #!/bin/bash, though

share|improve this answer

Set the positional parameters explicitly if none are given; then the for loop is the same for both cases:

[ $# -eq 0 ] && set -- config/*
for file in "$@"; do
    echo "Processing '$file'"
done
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.