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In Oracle 11g I was thinking of creating a table that looks like this:

CREATE TABLE SOME_TABLE (
  MACHINE_ID      NUMBER(10,0) NOT NULL ENABLE,
  CYCLE_ID        NUMBER NOT NULL ENABLE,
  START_TIME      TIMESTAMP (6) NOT NULL ENABLE,
  DATA            VARCHAR2(255),
  CONSTRAINT "PK_SOME_TABLE" PRIMARY KEY ("MACHINE_ID", "CYCLE_ID")
)

This table will receive approximately 2.5 million records per day.

The CYCLE_ID is taken from a sequence, and is part of the primary key.

I am worried that using a sequence for the CYCLE_ID for this amount of data is a bad idea because the sequence will restart at 0 at some point in time, thus resulting in duplicate key errors.

Would it be better to remove the CYCLE_ID from the table, thus leaving the table without a unique key ? What problems can I expect from having such a large volume table without a unique primary key ?

Thank you very much.

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2  
Because CYCLE_ID is limited to 10 digits you'll run out of numbers in about 11 years. I suggest you declare CYCLE_ID as NUMBER rather than NUMBER(10, 0). Share and enjoy. –  Bob Jarvis May 23 '14 at 11:12
    
That's not good is it ? The reason is that I generated this table through liquibase, and putting 'int' as a datatype. I will correct this in the question. Thank you. –  botkop May 23 '14 at 11:13
2  
Oh, and to actually answer your question - IMO creating a table without a primary key is a Really Bad Idea. YMMV. Share and enjoy. –  Bob Jarvis May 23 '14 at 11:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As per my opiniion don't remove sequence from your table rather alter your sequence. Remove the cycle clause from your sequence. This will solve your problem because then the sequence will never turn to 0 and your table will always have a primary key.

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2  
Well, you may be right. In SqlDeveloper I see that the maximum value of my sequence is 9999999999999999999999999999. If this number is correct, then it would take 10958904,10958904 years to get to the maximum value at a ratio of 2.5 million records per day. –  botkop May 23 '14 at 10:53
    
Exactly, thats why i suggested you to follow this approach. –  Ankit Bajpai May 23 '14 at 10:54

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