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I have a generated Subview that can be moved around. Every time it moves I check if it's passed 300 on the X-axis. My problem is, that when it passes the point and you don't stop moving it, the NSTimer gets started so often, that the program crashes.

NSArray *subviews = [self.view subviews];

for (UIView *subview in subviews) {
    if (subview.frame.origin.x > 300) {
        NSMutableArray *data = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:1];
        [data addObject:subview];
        [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:3.00 target:self selector:@selector(callFunction:) userInfo:data repeats:NO];
    }
}
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@Zero You don't need a reference to the timer because the timer passes itself as the argument to the callback method. Timers don't invalidate themselves -- you need to invalidate them when you no longer need them. –  jlehr May 23 at 13:18

3 Answers 3

You should keep a reference to NSTimer instances and when you don't want it to be fired anymore you can call -[NSTimer invalidate]

Update besides, is it your intentions to schedule timers in a loop?

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When should I invalidate it? I'd have to invalidate it at the end of the if, but then i would invalidate it before it has started the function –  Cupple Kay May 23 at 11:02
    
it would help if you an post a crash details; as for overall scheme, why are you sending a mutable array wrapping a single view? Isn't it easier to send just a view? –  Sash Zats May 23 at 11:04
    
ok so the problem was that I wasn't clever enough to read the crash details first. There was an outofrange exception or something like that and I only had to modify my other functions. Should i now delete the question? i'm not sure if I should but there's no real answer to it. –  Cupple Kay May 23 at 11:11

Add a property where you save a reference to the timer. So you can always check if NSTimer is already started and you stop it by

  [NSTimer invalidate];

you add a property @property(nonatomic, strong) NSTimer *timerand then you can check like:

if(!self.timer){
  self.timer = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:3.00 target:self selector:@selector(callFunction:) userInfo:data repeats:NO];
}
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Seems it still crashes. I checked if(!timer.isValid){} before starting the timer. –  Cupple Kay May 23 at 11:01
    
But if i stop it right away it won't get to start the function and nothing happens. –  Cupple Kay May 23 at 11:03
    
I edited my answer, hope that's what you need –  VWGolf2 May 23 at 11:13
    
Well I'm really thankful for your help but the problem was an OutOfRange exception or something like that and I only had to edit an other function. I feel like i should delete this question now, what do you say? –  Cupple Kay May 23 at 11:15
    
ok, but still this doesn not solve your problem with the NSTimer. Even if it doesn't cause your app to crash, you should not allocate NSTimer over and over. And next time it might be helpful to copy the crash message ;) –  VWGolf2 May 23 at 11:17

Try This :

[NSTimer invalidate];
NSTimer = nil;
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