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I have a long string and want to split it into segments of +/- 100 characters if it has more than 100 otherwise not. That means I have for example this string:

string input

"asld asö öasdn askdn asklcanscklans cakslcna acsklcnasclk ncaslkcnas casld asö öasdn askdn asklcanscklans cakslcna acsklcnasclk ncaslkcnas c"

and need these 2 strings out of it

1: "asld asö öasdn askdn asklcanscklans cakslcna acsklcnasclk ncaslkcnas casld asö öasdn askdn asklcanscklans"
2: "cakslcna acsklcnasclk ncaslkcnas c"

As you can see, I need to split them after the first space, after the 100th character.

I'm clueless how to do that with .split()

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3  
Hint: don't split, try to match. Here's a start /[\s\S]{1,100}\S*/g –  HamZa May 23 '14 at 11:14
1  
You can't do that only with split(). split is not the good method here. –  Casimir et Hippolyte May 23 '14 at 11:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about string.split(/(.{100}\S*)\s/).filter(function(e){return e;});

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this one doesnt return the firt 100+ chars –  gco May 23 '14 at 11:37
    
Are you need to have only one string 100 chars and one all other chars? –  3y3 May 23 '14 at 11:43
    
No. I need all characters. But splitted into chunks of each 100 or more depending on the first space after each 100th character. Your example doesn't output the first chars... or am I wrong? see: jsfiddle.net/ExSz6 –  gco May 23 '14 at 11:45
    
I update response for you see the output for your string. –  3y3 May 23 '14 at 11:47
1  
Oh, sorry. I see the problem. How about string.split(/(.{100}\S*)\s/).filter(function(e){return e;}); –  3y3 May 23 '14 at 11:58

You can use indexOf to search your string for a specified character, indexOf also provides an optional argument for a starting index in your string, giving you the position from which you can substring or do whatever you need to do:

string.indexOf(' ',100);

If you want to perform further splits you can use a loop to run back over the results and perform the same action.

There are some suggestions of using regex here which may be fine, all I would say is if you want to use Regex then go away and get an understanding of what the pattern does. Using code you don't understand makes your life difficult later on.

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Consider adding a suggestion on how to split the string, like `var index = string.indexOf(' ', 100); var part1 = string.substring(0, index + 1); var part2 = string.substring(index + 1 –  lrn May 23 '14 at 11:52
    
I was going to do this but I don't agree with debraining the entire process, I think the thread has enough detail for the asker to write a suitable solution. –  Yoda May 23 '14 at 11:55

As explained in the documentation, you can use a RegExp with split, and capture a part of it using capture groups.

var s = "asld asö öasdn askdn asklcanscklans cakslcna acsklcnasclk ncaslkcnas casld asö öasdn askdn asklcanscklans cakslcna acsklcnasclk ncaslkcnas c";
s.split(/(.{100}[^\s]*)\s/);

// 1 : "asld asö öasdn askdn asklcanscklans cakslcna acsklcnasclk ncaslkcnas casld asö öasdn askdn asklcanscklans"
// 2 : "cakslcna acsklcnasclk ncaslkcnas c"

And to remove the empty element(s), you can use the filter method :

s.split(/(.{100}[^\s]*)\s/).filter(function(s) {
    return s.length > 0;
});
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This is overkill, also the OP is probably not going to be helped by a regex which is possibly above his/her current level of understanding. –  Yoda May 23 '14 at 11:28
    
I don't think it is so difficult to understand, but you need to remove the empty element at the begining of the array (with the shift method for example) and to explain that it is possible to capture a part of the delimiter with a capture group. –  Casimir et Hippolyte May 23 '14 at 11:36
    
@CasimiretHippolyte The empty element is a problem that cannot be solved by using split. I edited my answer. The usage of capture group in split is explained in the documentation, I'll add a link. –  Sebastien C. May 23 '14 at 11:54
    
Since the empty element is at the begining, you can do that too: var arr = s.split(/(.{100}\S*)\s/); arr.shift(); console.log(arr); (and you avoid to parse all the array.) –  Casimir et Hippolyte May 23 '14 at 12:40
    
@CasimiretHippolyte Yes, but there are other empty spaces when the string is longer. –  Sebastien C. May 23 '14 at 13:07

You can find the first space after position 100 as:

var index = string.indexOf(' ', 100);

You want to split after this space, so your second part starts at:

var splitPoint = string.indexOf(' ', 100) + 1;

If the string is not 100 characters long, or there is no space after position 100, then splitPoint is zero (because indexOf returns -1), and you don't want to split.

So you can split the string as:

if (splitPoint > 0) {
  var part1 = string.substring(0, splitPoint);
  var part2 = string.substring(splitPoint);
  // Do something with the parts.
}
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You can easily do that using substr

var your_string = "asld asö öasdn askdn asklcanscklans cakslcna acsklcnasclk ncaslkcnas casld asö öasdn askdn asklcanscklans cakslcna acsklcnasclk ncaslkcnas c"

var string1 = your_string.substr(0,105);
var string2 = your_string.substr(106,your_string.length)
share|improve this answer
    
i could if i knew the length of the string and 105 is variable in my case –  gco May 23 '14 at 11:43

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