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I'm looking at some Java classes that have the following form:


public 
abstract
class A <E extends A<E>> implements Comparable <E> {

   public final int compareTo( E other ) {
      //  etc
   }   
}

public 
class B extends A <B> {
   // etc
}

public 
class C extends A <C> {
   // etc
}


My usage of "Comparable" here is just to illustrate a possible use of the generic parameter "E". Does this usage of generics/inheritance have a name? What is it used for?

My impression is that this allows the abstract class to provide a common implementation of a method (such as compareTo) without having to provide it in the subclasses. However, in this example, unlike an inherited method it would restrict subclasses to invoking compareTo on other instances of the same subclass, rather than any "A" subclass. Does this sound right?

Anyway, just curious if any gurus out there have seen this before and know what it does.

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In C++, it's known as the Curiously Recurring Template Pattern (CRTP). I don't know if it has a different name in Java (or even if it has a name), but it probably serve similar purposes.

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That wiki page has essentially the explanation I was looking for, thanks! I found the note about compile-time "static" polymorphism rather interesting. –  Tom Mar 4 '10 at 23:20
1  
There's a nice Java-oriented discussion of it here: madbean.com/2004/mb2004-3 Look for the heading "More tricks with type parameters" –  Alan Moore Mar 30 '10 at 19:47
    
URLs should be included in an answer for further reading only. This answer appears to rely heavily on the content of a URL and would benefit from a summary of the URL being included in the answer. –  Duncan Dec 28 '13 at 9:00
    
@Duncan That's precisely how the URL is being used here. You'll notice that the overlay text is "Curiously Recurring Template Pattern", which is all you need to go perform research on this topic. So it doesn't "rely heavily on the content of a URL" (whatever that means) whatsoever. This SO answer is no place for a tutorial on CRTP. That said, since all this answer does is name the pattern, I would hesitate to call it strictly complete. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 28 '13 at 15:33
    
It is pretty much never useful in Java. Generics in Java are about Type Safety. There is almost no circumstance when this would have any type safety benefit compared to class A<E>. C++ templates do not have type safety; it's completely different. –  newacct Dec 29 '13 at 0:17

I believe it is usually just called a Recursive Generic Type. As Tom Hawtin points out, you probably want class A<E extends A<E>>. The most prominent use of this pattern is java.lang.Enum (which you probably knew considering you chose Comparable<E> as your interface).

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No you wouldn't. You should just use class A<E>. –  newacct Dec 29 '13 at 0:18

It does not have a name and it is generally not useful. Probably the person who wrote it did not realize that they could write it like this instead:

class A<E> implements Comparable<E>

My impression is that this allows the abstract class to provide a common implementation of a method (such as compareTo) without having to provide it in the subclasses.

Not any more than class A<E>

However, in this example, unlike an inherited method it would restrict subclasses to invoking compareTo on other instances of the same subclass, rather than any "A" subclass. Does this sound right?

No, that's incorrect. It restrict it to invoking compareTo on E, whatever E is.

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