Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am curious how to write C code to read an input file, in a flexible way.

As a very easy example, suppose I have variables a, b, c and d. I can write an input file as follows

 a = 1.0 
 b = 5.0
 c = 2.33
 d = 0.9

And, if I declare a, b, c and d to be of type double, I can simply use

 FILE *fr;
 // set some default values
 double a = 1.0, b = 1.0,
       c = 2.0, d = 2.0;

 fr = fopen("input_file.txt", "rt");

 fscanf(fr, "a = %lf b =  %lf c =  %lf d =  %lf", &a, &b, &c, &d);

 printf("%f %f %f %f\n",
        a, b, c, d);

to read the data. But this seems rigid, for instance a, b, c and d have to be in exactly that order in the input file, so making the input file

 a = 1.0 
 c = 5.0
 b = 2.33
 d = 0.9

does not work, I cannot add comments for things like

 a = 1.0   // This is parameter foo, must have properties P1, P2 and P3
 c = 5.0
 b = 2.33
 d = 0.9

This is especially relevant when, say, I have 20 variables and not just a, b, c and d. Any help to make this as flexible as possible would be great. I have used code in Fortran that implemented "namelist" and that was really nice a flexible, something like that in C would be great.

share|improve this question
    
Remember that unless you implement it, C variables do not have names at runtime. –  unwind May 23 at 12:54
    
Hi, sorry but I am a bit confused by this. I am declaring the variable a, b, c and d and giving them some default values, but I would like the user to modify the values in an input file (instead of re-compiling each time) –  db1234 May 23 at 13:05
1  
It seems likely you'd need a structure such as struct VarMap { const char *name; double *data; } var_map[] = { { "a", &a }, { "b", &b }, { "c", &c }, { "d", &d }, }; to map (run-time) names to the different variables. You'd then use " %s = %lf" in the format to read the name (%s allows for multi-character names) and value, and then you search the varmap to find where to put the data. –  Jonathan Leffler May 23 at 15:38
    
@JonathanLeffler, Thanks, seems promising, but I have to admit that I don't quite follow everything. I understand the structure that you have defined, but I do not quite fully understand how to use the structure to read from the input file. –  db1234 May 23 at 20:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Transferring and expanding on a comment.

It seems likely you'd need a structure such as:

struct VarMap
{
    const char *name;
    double     *data;
} var_map[] =
{
    { "a", &a }, { "b", &b },
    { "c", &c }, { "d", &d },
};

to map (run-time) names to the different variables. You'd then use "%s = %lf" in the format to read the name (%s allows for multi-character names) and value, and then you search the varmap to find where to put the data.

enum { NUM_VARS = sizeof(varmap) / sizeof(varmap[0]) };

char name[10];
double value;

if (fscanf(fr, "%9s = %lf", name, &value) == 2)
{
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < NUM_VARS; i++)
    {
        if (strcmp(name, varmap[i].name) == 0)
        {
            *varmap[i].data = value;
            break;
        }
    }
    if (i == NUM_VARS)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Failed to find match for '%s = %g'\n", name, value);
        ...other error handling?...
    }
}

Clearly, if you've got large numbers of variables, you'll want to think in terms of a binary search or even a hash-based search for the names, and you'd abstract the search into a function rather than writing it inline as in the code above.

The initializer for varmap presents a restriction — for the most part, the names and the variables pointed at are fixed at compile time. An alternative mechanism would use an array of named variables:

struct NamedVar
{
    const char *name;
    double      value;
};

You might use a fixed-size array of char in the structure, or make the name into a flexible array member.

struct NamedVar
{
    double value;
    char   name[];
};

You can then dynamically allocate struct NamedVar values, keeping pointers to them in an array, adding new named variables on demand.

You'd need a function double named_variable(const char *name) to get the value, and void set_named_variable(const char *name, double value) to set the value. Which approach is best will depend on who can devise variable names and how many variable names you have to deal with. For 4 variables, or 40 variables, the struct VarMap approach is reasonable; for 400 variables, or 4000 variables, it really doesn't make sense and the struct NamedVar approach is probably better.

share|improve this answer
    
very nice, thanks! –  db1234 May 24 at 4:59

Most configuration file formats require parsing the file, filling some generic structures with the data contained therein and then processing these structures in order to find the values associated with what you'd like.

Check this stackoverflow link for more information on utilising a configuration parsing library for XML:

XML Parser for C

Your best bet would be to use INI, XML or JSON files, so another avenue of investigation is to look for parsers for those in C.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.