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I would like to have 4 actions with the same name (controller methods may have a different name, but their ActionName() attribute is the same for all 4 of them:

[ActionName("Same-name")]
public ActionResult AnonAction() { ... }

[HttpPost]
[ActionName("Same-name")]
public ActionResult AnonAction(ModelData data) { ... }

[Authorize]
[ActionName("Same-name")]
public ActionResult AuthAction() { ... }

[HttpPost]
[Authorize]
[ActionName("Same-name")]
public ActionResult AuthAction(OtherData data) { ... }

The first couple does something when users are not authenticated (anonymous users). The second couple does something similar (but not the same) when users are authenticated.

First three action methods work as expected, but I can't seem to make the last one work. It throws an exception telling me, that it can't distinguish between POST actions. I don't think I've made anything wrong here or forgotten to do something. I just hope it's nto a bug in Asp.net MVC 2 RC2.

Does anyone see any flaw in my actions?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

@Paco is right. AuthorizeAttribute doesn't have anything to do with action selection. His suggestion didn't feel right so thanks to him I did some digging into MVC code and I came up with the most appropriate solution myself.

Solution as it was meant to be

There's an extensibility point for these things in MVC. Basically what you have to do is to write you own ActionMethodSelectionAttribute that will handle this. I created one that selects action based on user authorization (either anonymous or authorized). Here's the code:

/// <summary>
/// Attribute restricts controller action execution only to either anonymous or authenticated users
/// </summary>
[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method, AllowMultiple = false, Inherited = false)]
public class AllowAuthenticatedAttribute : ActionMethodSelectorAttribute
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or sets a value indicating whether this <see cref="AllowAuthorizedAttribute"/> allows authenticated or anonymous users to execute decorated controller action.
    /// </summary>
    /// <value><c>true</c> if authenticated users are allowed to execute the action; <c>false</c> if anonymous users are allowed to execute the action.</value>
    public bool Authenticated { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="AllowAuthorizedAttribute"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="authenticated">If set to <c>true</c> only authorized users will be able to access this action.</param>
    public AllowAuthenticatedAttribute(bool authenticated)
    {
        this.Authenticated = authenticated;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Determines whether the action method selection is valid for the specified controller context.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="controllerContext">The controller context.</param>
    /// <param name="methodInfo">Information about the action method.</param>
    /// <returns>
    /// true if the action method selection is valid for the specified controller context; otherwise, false.
    /// </returns>
    public override bool IsValidForRequest(ControllerContext controllerContext, System.Reflection.MethodInfo methodInfo)
    {
        if (controllerContext == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("controllerContext");
        }
        return this.Authenticated == controllerContext.HttpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated;
    }
}

Additional observation

When I decorated my action methods with my custom attribute I still got the same exception until I added [HttpGet] to my GET actions. Why is that? I found the answer in the flowchart in Pro ASP.NET MVC Framework book (check it out yourself). Exception was thrown because there were more than just one action method with ActionMethodSelectorAttribute. Normally we just decorate out POST actions, but in this case all of them were decorated. 2 for anonymous and 2 for authenticated users. That's why you have to use both HttpGet and HttpPost on action methods when you add more selector attributes to them.

My controller actions now look like this

[HttpGet]
[AllowAuthenticated(false)]
[ActionName("Same-name")]
public ActionResult AnonAction() { ... }

[HttpPost]
[AllowAuthenticated(false)]
[ActionName("Same-name")]
public ActionResult AnonAction(ModelData data) { ... }

[HttpGet]
[Authorize]
[AllowAuthenticated(true)]
[ActionName("Same-name")]
public ActionResult AuthAction() { ... }

[HttpPost]
[Authorize]
[AllowAuthenticated(true)]
[ActionName("Same-name")]
public ActionResult AuthAction(OtherData data) { ... }
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Yes, this is a better solution for your case. I didn't know about the actionmethod selector attribute. Maybe you can call the authorize attribute inside the allowauthenticated attribute, than it won't be required to have both the attributes. After that, you can even do a replace on the authorize attribute in all your controllers. It will behave as an authorize attribute, with a "unauthorized handler" controller method as extra option. (copying it in my codebase soon) –  Paco Mar 5 '10 at 22:25

You have to create a route constraint for the authorized and non authorized actions. System.Web.Routing is not doing anything with the authorize attribute.

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly. You're right. I thought authorization filter is used for that. –  Robert Koritnik Mar 4 '10 at 22:34
    
+1 from me, because it led me to the right solution. –  Robert Koritnik Mar 4 '10 at 22:42

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