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Suppose I have this array

array([[100,   1],
       [200,   2],
       [300,   3],
       [400,   4],
       [440,   3]])

And I have this list or a 1d array [100,300]. I want my operation to output [1,3]. How can I do this in numpy.

I am actually using these numpy arrays within Theano (a machine learning library which speeds up computation using gpu). I will have lots of rows. Numpy arrays allow me to seamlessly use them as Tensor objects in Theano. But if I had to use a dictionary I would have to do that in plain Python, and I am not sure if that will hold up well, once I move on to large data. So I am actually looking for a numpy operation, some trick in indexing or something like that.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by gg349, Veedrac, Linger, Zero Piraeus, MattDMo May 24 '14 at 17:34

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What operation would you like to accomplish? –  cchristelis May 23 '14 at 14:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use np.in1d:

In [12]: arr
Out[12]: 
array([[100,   1],
       [200,   2],
       [300,   3],
       [400,   4],
       [440,   3]])

In [14]: vals = [100, 300]
In [23]: np.in1d(arr[:,0], vals)
Out[23]: array([ True, False,  True, False, False], dtype=bool)

In [24]: arr[np.in1d(arr[:,0], vals), 1]
Out[24]: array([1, 3])

If you need to call np.in1d for many different values of vals, then it may pay to prepare a dict as arshajii suggests, since after preparing the dict (a O(n) operation, where n = len(arr)), looking up the values would be a O(m) operation, where m = len(vals).

If n gets very large however, a dict may require too much memory. In that case you may need to use np.in1d.

If the index (key) values are all ints and of small magnitude, there is a NumPy indexing trick you could use to get O(m) performance without using a dict:

In [30]: big = np.full(arr[:,0].max()+1, np.nan)

In [31]: big[arr[:,0]] = arr[:,1]

In [32]: big[vals]
Out[32]: array([ 1.,  3.])

Preparing big is an O(n) operation, but indexing big[vals] is O(m). If arr[:,0].max() is small and the key values are ints, the advantage of using big is that it requires less memory than using a dict.


In [33]: %timeit arr[np.in1d(arr[:,0], vals), 1]
10000 loops, best of 3: 21.5 µs per loop

In [34]: %timeit big[vals]
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.23 µs per loop

Compare with arshajii's solution:

In [38]: d = dict(arr)
In [40]: %timeit [d[k] for k in vals]
1000000 loops, best of 3: 447 ns per loop

So the best method to use depends on the size of arr and vals, how many times you will be performing this operation, how much memory you have, and if the keys are small ints. You'll need to benchmark on data relevant to your use case to make a good decision.

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Thanks! I will look into it. in1d seems to be exactly what I am looking for. –  Morpheus May 23 '14 at 15:04

I would simply convert your array to a dictionary:

>>> a = array([[100,   1],
...            [200,   2],
...            [300,   3],
...            [400,   4],
...            [440,   3]])
>>> 
>>> keys = [100, 300]
>>> 
>>> d = dict(a)
>>> 
>>> [d[k] for k in keys]
[1, 3]
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I would assume that the rows can become longer than just 2 elements. –  Midnighter May 23 '14 at 14:12
    
@Midnighter What would the OP want in that case as the final list? I'm not sure we should assume that because the OP's example suggests that the rows will always have 2 elements. –  arshajii May 23 '14 at 14:13
    
Yes, I will have only two columns. But I am actually using these numpy arrays within Theano (a machine learning library which speeds up computation using gpu). I will have lots of rows. Numpy arrays allow me to seamlessly use them as Tensor objects in Theano. But if I had to use a dictionary I would have to do that in plain Python, and I am not sure if that will hold up well, once I move on to large data. So I am actually looking for a numpy operation, some trick in indexing or something like that. –  Morpheus May 23 '14 at 14:20

If you're sure that all values to search for are actually present in the search array, you could also use np.searchsorted. Seems faster compared to the other suggestions, for large arrays.

s = np.sort(A[:,0])
A[np.searchsorted(s, values), 1]

If the array to search in is already sorted, you can omit the sort off course and the operation will be even quicker.

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