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This is a stylistic question. I want to loop twice with a variable on which is set to false, then to true. Which of these is clearer:

A)

for (final boolean on : new boolean[] { false, true} )
{
   doStuffBasedOnABooleanFlag(on);
}

B)

for (int i = 0; i < 2; ++i)
{
   final boolean on = (i == 1);
   doStuffBasedOnABooleanFlag(on);
}

C) something else


edit: Murphy's law of unintended interpretations comes into play... the use case I have originally looked something like this instead of doStuffBasedOnABooleanFlag:

for (final boolean on : new boolean[] { false, true} )
{
   JButton button = on ? onButton : offButton;
   button.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
      @Override public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent event) {
      doStuffLaterBasedOnABooleanFlag(on);
      }
   }
}

But I think I like Brendan's answer, I'll just refactor the loop contents into a separate method:

doStuffBasedOnABooleanFlag(false);
doStuffBasedOnABooleanFlag(true);

   ...

private void doStuffBasedOnABooleanFlag(final boolean on)
{
   JButton button = on ? onButton : offButton;
   button.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {
      @Override public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent event) {
      doStuffLaterBasedOnABooleanFlag(on);
      }
   }
}
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I guess you accidentally answered your own question then and I just helped you realize it? –  Brendan Long Mar 4 '10 at 23:04
    
heh, yeah.... :-) –  Jason S Mar 5 '10 at 12:42
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4 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Since it's two lines, I'd just skip the loop and do:

doStuffBasedOnABooleanFlag(false);
doStuffBasedOnABooleanFlag(true);

Less code, more obvious, more efficient.

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I prefer this answer. Simple, clear, and impossible to misinterpret. –  Joshua Mar 4 '10 at 22:36
    
i like that. the for, final, i = 0 while <2 with i == 1?!? and whatever is way too complicated. just call the method twice! :) i had to delete my answer because i've got it wrong from looking at the question too loosely. two simple method calls are much easier to read. –  stmax Mar 4 '10 at 22:41
1  
btw you've got the true/false in the wrong order, too ;) –  stmax Mar 4 '10 at 22:42
    
+1. A lot more clear. –  mheathershaw Mar 4 '10 at 22:43
    
I got the order wrong at first but it's fixed (false then true). Thanks stmax. –  Brendan Long Mar 4 '10 at 22:44
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Another option would be to avoid the boolean and use an enum:

enum Mode { APPEND, REPLACE } // or whatever your boolean indicated

You could then either iterate:

for(Mode m : Mode.values()) doStuff(m);

Or do the calls directly:

doStuff(Mode.APPEND);
doStuff(Mode.REPLACE);

The advantage of this would be that the API indicates more clearly what's happening.

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1  
Awesome. You might even end up putting the code that WAS in your loop into your Mode class itself, Mode.APPEND.doStuff(). Otherwise doStuff is a non-OO utility method--yuck. –  Bill K Mar 4 '10 at 22:51
    
@Bill K: I agree, but doStuff() in my case is a non-static method that needs access to other non-static methods. –  Jason S Mar 4 '10 at 22:55
    
Enums methods can be non-static, and have access to other items inside the enum. They are very powerful, in fact. enums are full-featured classes, just limited to pre-defined instances. –  Bill K Mar 5 '10 at 19:44
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If you really want to use a loop, I would go with (a). While it's novel, it's also clear and efficient. I might move the boolean array to a private static, to avoid recreating the array every time.

But I like Brendan's answer better.

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It's not just the loop, I'm also really uncomfortable with the use of booleans in this way.

What about something like:

  ActionListener myListener = new ActionListener() {
    @Override
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent event) {
      doStuffLaterBasedOnABooleanFlag(event.getSource() == onButton);
    }
  };
  onButton.addActionListener(myListener);
  offButton.addActionListener(myListener);

That still leaves the boolean within the listener, but without knowing what the doStuffLater method does that's as far as we can go.

share|improve this answer
    
I need the boolean. I can't post my real code, it's more complicated than this, and I have two lists of UI components, one handled one way, the other handled the other way. –  Jason S Mar 5 '10 at 12:44
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