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I'm looking for presence of an element in a list.

In Python there is an in keyword and I would do something like:

if element in list:
    doTask

Is there something equivalent in Perl without having to manually iterate through the entire list?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 46 down vote accepted

If you can get away with requiring Perl v5.10, then you can use any of the following examples.

  • The smart match ~~ operator.

    if( $element ~~ @list ){ ... }
    if( $element ~~ [ 1, 2, 3 ] ){ ... }
    
  • You could also use the given/when construct. Which uses the smart match functionality internally.

    given( $element ){
       when( @list ){ ... }
    }
    
  • You can also use a for loop as a "topicalizer" ( meaning it sets $_ ).

    for( @elements ){
       when( @list ){ ... }
    }
    

One thing that will come out in Perl 5.12 is the ability to use the post-fix version of when. Which makes it even more like if and unless.

given( $element ){
  ... when @list;
}

If you have to be able to run on older versions of Perl, there still are several options.

  • You might think you can get away with using List::Util::first, but there are some edge conditions that make it problematic.

    In this example it is fairly obvious that we want to successfully match against 0. Unfortunately this code will print failure every time.

    use List::Util qw'first';
    my $element = 0;
    if( first { $element eq $_ } 0..9 ){
      print "success\n";
    } else {
      print "failure\n";
    }
    

    You could check the return value of first for defined-ness, but that will fail if we actually want a match against undef to succeed.

  • You can safely use grep however.

    if( grep { $element eq $_ } 0..9 ){ ... }
    

    This is safe because grep gets called in a scalar context. Arrays return the number of elements when called in scalar context. So this will continue to work even if we try to match against undef.

  • You could use an enclosing for loop. Just make sure you call last, to exit out of the loop on a successful match. Otherwise you might end up running your code more than once.

    for( @array ){
      if( $element eq $_ ){
        ...
        last;
      }
    }
    
  • You could put the for loop inside the condition of the if statement ...

    if(
      do{
        my $match = 0;
        for( @list ){
          if( $element eq $_ ){
            $match = 1;
            last;
          }
        }
        $match; # the return value of the do block
      }
    ){
      ...
    }
    
  • ... but it might be more clear to put the for loop before the if statement.

    my $match = 0;
    for( @list ){
      if( $_ eq $element ){
        $match = 1;
        last;
      }
    }
    
    if( $match ){ ... }
    
  • If you're only matching against strings, you could also use a hash. This can speed up your program if @list is large and, you are going to match against %hash several times. Especially if @array doesn't change, because then you only have to load up %hash once.

    my %hash = map { $_, 1 } @array;
    if( $hash{ $element } ){ ... }
    
  • You could also make your own subroutine. This is one of the cases where it is useful to use prototypes.

    sub in(&@){
      local $_;
      my $code = shift;
      for( @_ ){ # sets $_
        if( $code->() ){
          return 1;
        }
      }
      return 0;
    }
    
    if( in { $element eq $_ } @list ){ ... }
    
share|improve this answer
    
very good, although a little too long answer –  xxxxxxx Mar 10 '10 at 17:18
    
@BradGilbert Good job! –  gaussblurinc May 22 '13 at 12:10
    
@xxxxxxx You say that, but my highest voted answers are generally also the longest. –  Brad Gilbert May 22 '13 at 21:33
    
@BradGilbert wow! I like operator ~~! it is so wavy and helpful! :) –  gaussblurinc Jun 10 '13 at 15:58
if( $element ~~ @list ){
   do_task
}

~~ is the "smart match operator", and does more than just list membership detection.

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7  
That's new to 5.10 right? –  Devin Ceartas Mar 4 '10 at 23:37
3  
You are correct. –  Robert P Mar 5 '10 at 0:12

List::Util::first

$foo = first { ($_ && $_ eq "value" } @list;    # first defined value in @list

Or for hand-rolling types:

my $is_in_list = 0;
foreach my $elem (@list) {
    if ($elem && $elem eq $value_to_find) {
        $is_in_list = 1;
        last;
    }
}
if ($is_in_list) {
   ...

A slightly different version MIGHT be somewhat faster on very long lists:

my $is_in_list = 0;
for (my $i = 0; i < scalar(@list); ++$i) {
    if ($list[i] && $list[i] eq $value_to_find) {
        $is_in_list = 1;
        last;
    }
}
if ($is_in_list) {
   ...
share|improve this answer
    
this is pretty half-assed. -1 –  xxxxxxx Mar 10 '10 at 17:20

If you plan to do this many times, you can trade-off space for lookup time:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict; use warnings;

my @array = qw( one ten twenty one );
my %lookup = map { $_ => undef } @array;

for my $element ( qw( one two three ) ) {
    if ( exists $lookup{ $element }) {
        print "$element\n";
    }
}

assuming that the number of times the element appears in @array is not important and the contents of @array are simple scalars.

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1  
Good technique that is definitely worth mentioning. –  jrockway Mar 5 '10 at 1:04
    
good technique with the mention that it pays off only when multiple lookups are made. +1 –  xxxxxxx Mar 10 '10 at 17:19

grep is helpful here

if (grep { $_ eq $element } @list) {
    ....
}
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6  
List::Util::first is probably a slightly more efficient way of doing this. –  jrockway Mar 4 '10 at 23:36
    
But there is more than one way ... –  Aif Mar 4 '10 at 23:44
1  
or vastly more efficient, if @list is of significant size, since List::Util::first won't continue past the first match, but grep will. –  MkV Mar 4 '10 at 23:51
4  
I tested this with a large list, and both are pretty fast. By the time the speed difference is noticeable, my machine had burned through 6 gigs of RAM. If your list is qw(foo bar baz), it probably doesn't matter much. –  jrockway Mar 5 '10 at 1:04
    
Large datasets aside where the matching element is not near the end, this is a great/easy way to get the answer. –  mleykamp Mar 5 '10 at 14:55

TIMTOWTDI

sub is (&@) {
  my $test = shift;
  $test->() and return 1 for @_;
  0
}

sub in (@) {@_}

if( is {$_ eq "a"} in qw(d c b a) ) {
  print "Welcome in perl!\n";
}
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1  
I like it ! –  Brad Gilbert Mar 5 '10 at 20:21
    
I don't like it, I hate Perl. –  Hynek -Pichi- Vychodil Mar 6 '10 at 11:08

List::MoreUtils

On perl >= 5.10 the smart match operator is surely the easiest way, as many others have already said.

On older versions of perl, I would instead suggest List::MoreUtils::any.

List::MoreUtils is not a core module (some say it should be) but it's very popular and it's included in major perl distributions.

It has the following advantages:

  • it returns true/false (as Python's in does) and not the value of the element, as List::Util::first does (which makes it hard to test, as noted above);
  • unlike grep, it stops at the first element which passes the test (perl's smart match operator short circuits as well);
  • it works with any perl version (well, >= 5.00503 at least).

Here is an example which works with any searched (scalar) value, including undef:

use List::MoreUtils qw(any);

my $value = 'test'; # or any other scalar
my @array = (1, 2, undef, 'test', 5, 6);

no warnings 'uninitialized';

if ( any { $_ eq $value } @array ) {
    print "$value present\n"
}

P.S.

(In production code it's better to narrow the scope of no warnings 'uninitialized').

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This blog post discusses the best answers to this question.

As a short summary, if you can install CPAN modules then the best solutions are:

if any(@ingredients) eq 'flour';

or

if @ingredients->contains('flour');

However, a more usual idiom is:

if @any { $_ eq 'flour' } @ingredients

which i find less clear.

But please don't use the first() function! It doesn't express the intent of your code at all. Don't use the "Smart match" operator: it is broken. And don't use grep() nor the solution with a hash: they iterate through the whole list. While any() will stop as soon as it finds your value.

Check out the blog post for more details.

PS: i'm answering for people who will have the same question in the future.

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I think the usual idiom is if any { $_ eq 'flour' } @ingredients, but you have to remember to use List::MoreUtils qw/ any /;. –  gpojd May 22 '13 at 12:38

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