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I can't use "long long"; what should I be using?

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2  
Why can't you use long long? Does your compiler not support it? –  Alok Singhal Mar 4 '10 at 23:40
    
What compiler are you using? –  Cameron Mar 4 '10 at 23:43
3  
Does Darwin/MacOSX support the fixed size integer typedefs, like int64_t? If so, I'd use those. See opengroup.org/onlinepubs/000095399/basedefs/stdint.h.html for details. –  Void Mar 4 '10 at 23:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Assuming Snow Leopard (Mac OS X 10.6.2 - Intel), then 'long' is 64-bits with the default compiler.

Specify 'g++ -m64' and it will likely be 64-bits on earlier versions too.

 1 = sizeof(char)
 1 = sizeof(unsigned char)
 2 = sizeof(short)
 2 = sizeof(unsigned short)
 4 = sizeof(int)
 4 = sizeof(unsigned int)
 8 = sizeof(long)
 8 = sizeof(unsigned long)
 4 = sizeof(float)
 8 = sizeof(double)
16 = sizeof(long double)
 8 = sizeof(size_t)
 8 = sizeof(ptrdiff_t)
 8 = sizeof(time_t)
 8 = sizeof(void *)
 8 = sizeof(char *)
 8 = sizeof(short *)
 8 = sizeof(int *)
 8 = sizeof(long *)
 8 = sizeof(float *)
 8 = sizeof(double *)
 8 = sizeof(int (*)(void))
 8 = sizeof(double (*)(void))
 8 = sizeof(char *(*)(void))

Tested with:

i686-apple-darwin10-g++-4.2.1 (GCC) 4.2.1 (Apple Inc. build 5646) (dot 1)
Copyright (C) 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

Compiling with GCC 4.7.1 on Mac OS X 10.7.5 with option -std=c99, the output from the program is more extensive. Thanks to apalopohapa for pointing out the oversight that long long etc were missing from the original.

 1 = sizeof(char)
 1 = sizeof(unsigned char)
 2 = sizeof(short)
 2 = sizeof(unsigned short)
 4 = sizeof(int)
 4 = sizeof(unsigned int)
 8 = sizeof(long)
 8 = sizeof(unsigned long)
 4 = sizeof(float)
 8 = sizeof(double)
16 = sizeof(long double)
 8 = sizeof(size_t)
 8 = sizeof(ptrdiff_t)
 8 = sizeof(time_t)
 8 = sizeof(long long)
 8 = sizeof(unsigned long long)
 8 = sizeof(uintmax_t)
 1 = sizeof(int8_t)
 2 = sizeof(int16_t)
 4 = sizeof(int32_t)
 8 = sizeof(int64_t)
 1 = sizeof(int_least8_t)
 2 = sizeof(int_least16_t)
 4 = sizeof(int_least32_t)
 8 = sizeof(int_least64_t)
 1 = sizeof(int_fast8_t)
 2 = sizeof(int_fast16_t)
 4 = sizeof(int_fast32_t)
 8 = sizeof(int_fast64_t)
 8 = sizeof(uintptr_t)
 8 = sizeof(void *)
 8 = sizeof(char *)
 8 = sizeof(short *)
 8 = sizeof(int *)
 8 = sizeof(long *)
 8 = sizeof(float *)
 8 = sizeof(double *)
 8 = sizeof(int (*)(void))
 8 = sizeof(double (*)(void))
 8 = sizeof(char *(*)(void))
 1 = sizeof(struct { char a; })
 2 = sizeof(struct { short a; })
 4 = sizeof(struct { int a; })
 8 = sizeof(struct { long a; })
 4 = sizeof(struct { float a; })
 8 = sizeof(struct { double a; })
16 = sizeof(struct { char a; double b; })
16 = sizeof(struct { short a; double b; })
16 = sizeof(struct { long a; double b; })
 4 = sizeof(struct { char a; char b; short c; })
16 = sizeof(struct { char a; char b; long c; })
 4 = sizeof(struct { short a; short b; })
 6 = sizeof(struct { char a[3]; char b[3]; })
 8 = sizeof(struct { char a[3]; char b[3]; short c; })
16 = sizeof(struct { long double a; })
32 = sizeof(struct { char a; long double b; })
16 = sizeof(struct { char a; long long b; })
16 = sizeof(struct { char a; uintmax_t b; })
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4  
Additionally, if you include <types.h>, you can use int64_t, and uint64_t, which are typedef'd to the appropriate type type, and makes it explicit what you are using. –  bobDevil Mar 4 '10 at 23:55
1  
int64_t at al are actually in <stdint.h> –  Paul R Mar 5 '10 at 8:40
3  
Relying on the table you just posted is bad advice. If you want 64 bits, use int64_t. It's standard for a reason. –  asveikau Mar 5 '10 at 10:08
    
Where's long long? –  apalopohapa Oct 5 '12 at 19:41
    
@apalopohapa: MIA — pure oversight. I must either have compiled an old version or have compiled without -std=c99. The code dated 2010-03-05 produces many extra values when compiled with -std=c99. See update — and thanks for the question. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 5 '12 at 20:41

Include <stdint.h> or <inttypes.h> (the later is found on some more compilers, but both are provided by the Apple compiler), and use uint64_t and int64_t. They are 64-bit on both 32-bit and 64-bit targets.

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