Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am asking a specific question here (not an opinion): is there any scala style guide recommendation for the following "case o:" addressing whether the (optional) use of braces were to be avoided or if either with/without were both acceptable:

 def mycase(x : Int) = {
      x match {
      case 0 =>
        println("zero")
        println("blah zero")
      case 1 =>
        println("one")
      }

I was not initially convinced it would even work (thought it might do a fall through): but it does the correct breakout:

scala> mycase(0)
zero
blah zero

I specifically want to know if there were a canonical answer on this (not "I prefer" , etc.). E.g. for java, Sun had stated long ago that placing the initial curly brace for a method may happen either on same or next line - both are acceptable. is there such a clear answer in this case?

UPDATE An answer provided below by @acjay provides a link to the style guide. Inside here is a specific blurb.

from http://docs.scala-lang.org/style/control-structures.html#curlybraces

case - Omit braces if the case expression fits on a single line. Otherwise, use curly braces for clarity (even though they are not required by the parser).

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The Scala Documentation Style Guide says:

case - Omit braces if the case expression fits on a single line. Otherwise, use curly braces for clarity (even though they are not required by the parser).

Therefore, the correct format is:

def mycase(x : Int) = x match {
  case 0 => {
    println("zero")
    println("blah zero")
  }
  case 1 => println("one")
}

Separate from the question, but with pertinence to the example given, the declarations section of the style guide mentions the preferred formatting for the match as such:

Methods which contain a single match expression should be declared in the following way:

def sum(ls: List[Int]): Int = ls match {
  case hd :: tail => hd + sum(tail)
  case Nil => 0
}
share|improve this answer
    
My OP specifically stated not to provide an opinion, and instead to provide a reference to canonical style (if such exists). –  javadba May 23 at 19:03
    
I've added the citation –  acjay May 23 at 19:05
    
OK, your update to the question is better. Though, please change the wording of "I would .." which was explicitly requested not to be used in the OP. –  javadba May 23 at 19:05
    
Flipped around for greater authoritativeness –  acjay May 23 at 19:07
    
OK, I had added the specifics to my OP (as opposed to adding another answer). In any case I will award. Pls consider an upvote. –  javadba May 23 at 19:08

In regards to the same/next line for the curly brace the Style Guide is explicit on that as well:

Opening curly braces ({) must be on the same line as the declaration they represent:

def foo = {   
  ...
}

Technically, Scala’s parser does support GNU-style notation with opening braces on the line following the declaration. However, the parser is not terribly predictable when dealing with this style due to the way in which semi-colon inference is implemented. Many headaches will be saved by simply following the curly brace convention demonstrated above.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks for participating. Actually my comment was wrt Java and the Sun style for its JDK, not Scala. Agreed: scala does not like braces on next line (and neither do I personally so that is a bonus). –  javadba May 23 at 19:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.