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I'm trying to read binary data using C#. I have all information about the layout of the data in the files I want to read. I'm able to read the data "chunk by chunk", i.e. getting the first 40 bytes of data converting it to a string, get the next 40 bytes, ...

Since there are at least three slighlty different version of the data, I would like to read the data directly into a struct. It just feels so much more right than by reading it "line by line".

I have tried the following approach but to no avail:

StructType aStruct;
int count = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(StructType));
byte[] readBuffer = new byte[count];
BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(stream);
readBuffer = reader.ReadBytes(count);
GCHandle handle = GCHandle.Alloc(readBuffer, GCHandleType.Pinned);
aStruct = (StructType) Marshal.PtrToStructure(handle.AddrOfPinnedObject(), typeof(StructType));
handle.Free();

The stream is an opened FileStream from which I have began to read from. I get an AccessViolationException when using Marshal.PtrToStructure.

The stream contains more information than I'm trying to read since I'm not interested in data at the end of the file.

The struct is defined like:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
struct StructType
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public string FileDate;
    [FieldOffset(8)]
    public string FileTime;
    [FieldOffset(16)]
    public int Id1;
    [FieldOffset(20)]
    public string Id2;
}

The examples code is changed from original to make this question shorter.

How would I read binary data from a file into a struct?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote
+100

The problem is the strings in your struct. I found that marshaling types like byte/short/int is not a problem; but when you need to marshal into a complex type such as a string, you need your struct to explicitly mimic an unmanaged type. You can do this with the MarshalAs attrib.

For your example, the following should work:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
struct StructType
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = 8)]
    public string FileDate;

    [FieldOffset(8)]
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = 8)]
    public string FileTime;

    [FieldOffset(16)]
    public int Id1;

    [FieldOffset(20)]
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = 66)] //Or however long Id2 is.
    public string Id2;
}
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As Ronnie said, I'd use BinaryReader and read each field individually. I can't find the link to the article with this info, but it's been observed that using BinaryReader to read each individual field can be faster than Marshal.PtrToStruct, if the struct contains less than 30-40 or so fields. I'll post the link to the article when I find it.

The article's link is at: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/10750/Fast-Binary-File-Reading-with-C

When marshaling an array of structs, PtrToStruct gains the upper-hand more quickly, because you can think of the field count as fields * array length.

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1  
I was just reading: codeproject.com/KB/files/fastbinaryfileinput.aspx. Is this the article you're thinking of? The author notes: "I found that, at about 40 fields, the results for the three approaches were almost equivalent, and beyond that, the block reading approaches gained an upper hand." –  Neal S. Jun 10 '10 at 19:39
    
Indeed it is! Good find :) –  nevelis Jun 17 '10 at 3:37

I had no luck using the BinaryFormatter, I guess I have to have a complete struct that matches the content of the file exactly. I realised that in the end I wasn't interested in very much of the file content anyway so I went with the solution of reading part of stream into a bytebuffer and then converting it using

Encoding.ASCII.GetString()

for strings and

BitConverter.ToInt32()

for the integers.

I will need to be able to parse more of the file later on but for this version I got away with just a couple of lines of code.

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Reading straight into structs is evil - many a C program has fallen over because of different byte orderings, different compiler implementations of fields, packing, word size.......

You are best of serialising and deserialising byte by byte. Use the build in stuff if you want or just get used to BinaryReader.

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4  
I disagree, reading straight into structs is sometimes the fastest way to get your data into a usable object. If you're writing performance oriented code this can be very useful. Yes you must be aware of alignments and packing and be sure any endpoint machine will use the same. –  Joe Feb 3 '12 at 20:00
2  
I also disagree. When performance is key, or when you need binary C++/C# interop, writing plain structs is the way to go. –  Dmitri Nesteruk Mar 25 '12 at 7:48

Here is what i'm using. This worked successfully for me for reading Portable Executable format. It's a generic function so T is your struct type.

    public static T ByteToType<T>(BinaryReader reader)
    {
        byte[] bytes = reader.ReadBytes(Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(T)));

        GCHandle handle = GCHandle.Alloc(bytes, GCHandleType.Pinned);
        T theStructure = (T)Marshal.PtrToStructure(handle.AddrOfPinnedObject(), typeof(T));
        handle.Free();

        return theStructure;
    }
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Try this:

using (FileStream stream = new FileStream(fileName, FileMode.Open))
{
BinaryFormatter formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
StructType aStruct = (StructType)formatter.Deserialize(filestream);
}
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2  
BinaryFormatter has its own format for binary data - which is fine if you are reading/writing the data yourself. not useful if you are getting a file from another source. –  russau Jul 26 '09 at 7:11

I don't see any problem with your code.

just out of my head, what if you try to do it manually? does it work?

BinaryReader reader = new BinaryReader(stream);
StructType o = new StructType();
o.FileDate = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(reader.ReadBytes(8));
o.FileTime = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(reader.ReadBytes(8));
...
...
...

also try

StructType o = new StructType();
byte[] buffer = new byte[Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(StructType))];
GCHandle handle = GCHandle.Alloc(buffer, GCHandleType.Pinned);
Marshal.StructureToPtr(o, handle.AddrOfPinnedObject(), false);
handle.Free();

then use buffer[] in your BinaryReader instead of reading data from FileStream to see whether you still get AccessViolation exception.

I had no luck using the BinaryFormatter, I guess I have to have a complete struct that matches the content of the file exactly.

That makes sense, BinaryFormatter has its own data format, completely incompatible with yours.

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