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I'm trying to write a program that allows a user to input data into a text file to organize class assignments. The user can display the list of assignments, enter an assignment into the file, and search for specific course work that is due. I am having a problem where I get an access violation writing location error and I'm not entirely sure how to fix it. I have looked at previous discussions that are posted but can't quite figure out where I am going wrong in my code. This is taskList.cpp. The header file taskList.h is posted after it. I'm using VS2013.

When I debug the error is posted at line 55 in the taskList.cpp file below

list = new Task[capacity];

#include "taskList.h"
#include "mytools.h"

TaskList::TaskList()
{
capacity = CAP;
list = new Task[capacity];
size = 0;
}
TaskList::TaskList(char filename[])
{


capacity = CAP;
list = new Task[capacity];
size = 0;
//load from file.
ifstream inData;
Task aTask;
char tempName[MAXCHAR];
char tempDescription[MAXCHAR];
char tempDate[MAXCHAR];

inData.open("task.txt");
if (!inData){
    cout << "cannot open file";
    exit(0);
}
inData.getline(tempName, MAXCHAR, ';');
while (!inData.eof())
{
    inData.getline(tempDescription, MAXCHAR, '\n');
    inData.getline(tempDate, MAXCHAR, '\n');

    aTask.setName(tempName);
    aTask.setDescription(tempDescription);
    aTask.setDate(tempDate);
    addTask(aTask);

    inData.getline(tempName, MAXCHAR, ';');
}

inData.close();

;
TaskList::~TaskList()
{
if (list)
{
    delete [] list;
    list = NULL;
}
}
//Adds a video item to the list
void TaskList::addTask(Task aTask)
{
list[size++] = aTask;
}

//displays the list of videos
void TaskList::showList()
{
int i = 0;
for (i = 0; i < size; i++)
{
    list[i].printTask();
}
}

void TaskList::searchList()
{
char searchName[MAXCHAR];
char tempName[MAXCHAR];
int i;
bool found = false;

cout << "Enter the name of the course to search for: ";
cin.getline(searchName, MAXCHAR);

for (i = 0; i < size; i++)
{
    list[i].getName(tempName);
    if (strstr(searchName, tempName) != NULL)
    {
        list[i].printTask();
        found = true;
    }
}
if (found == false)
    cout << "No search results." << endl;
}
void TaskList::writeData()
{
ofstream outData;
outData.open("task.txt");
if (!outData)
{
    cout << "cannot open file";
    exit(0);
}
for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    list[i].printToFile(outData);

outData.close();
}
//expand array function
void TaskList::expand()
{
char tempName[MAXCHAR];
char tempDescription[MAXCHAR];
char tempDate[MAXCHAR];

capacity += GROWTH;
Task *temp = new Task[capacity];
//copy from old array to new array
for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
{
    list[i].getName(tempName);
    list[i].getDescription(tempDescription);
    list[i].getDate(tempDate);

    temp[i].setName(tempName);
    temp[i].setDescription(tempDescription);
    temp[i].setDate(tempDate);
}
//delete old array
delete [] list;
list = NULL;
//point ptr to temp
list = temp;
//set temp to NULL
temp = NULL;
}

The header file (taskList.h)

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

const int CAP = 2;
const int GROWTH = 2;

//define class VideoList for array of Videos and its size.
class TaskList
{
private:
Task *list;
int size;
int capacity;
void expand();
public:
//constructors
TaskList();
TaskList(char filename[]);
//destructor
~TaskList();
//database functions
void addTask(Task aTask);
void showList();
void searchList();
void writeData();
};

#endif

Just to be sure that everything is made clear because there are 3 header files, 4 source files, and a text file, I am include the task.h header file and task.cpp source file.

Here is task.h:

#ifndef TASK_H
#define TASK_H
#define _CRT_SECURE_NO_WARNINGS

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string.h>

using namespace std;
const int MAXCHAR = 101;


class Task
{
private:
char *name;
char *description;
char *date;
public:
//defult constructor
Task();
//constructor with parameters
Task(char newName[], char newDescription[], char newDate[]);
//copy constructor
Task(const Task &otherTask);
//Accessor funct
void getName(char returnName[]);
void getDescription(char returnDescription[]);
void getDate(char returnDate[]);
//mutator function
void setName(char newName[]);
void setDescription(char newDescription[]);
void setDate(char newDate[]);
//print function to print a video
void printTask();
void printToFile(ofstream &outFile);

const Task& operator= (const Task& anItem);
};


#endif

Here is the task.cpp file, not sure if this is necessary but I am adding it for clarity:

#include "task.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;


//defult constructor
Task::Task()
{
strcpy(name, "no course name");
strcpy(description, "no task description");
strcpy(date, "no due date");
}

//constructor with parameters
Task::Task(char newName[], char newDescription[], char newDate[])
{
name = new char[strlen(newName) + 1];
description = new char[strlen(newDescription) + 1];
date = new char[strlen(newDate) + 1];
strcpy(name, newName);
strcpy(description, newDescription);
strcpy(date, newDate);
}
//copy constructor
Task::Task(const Task &otherTask)
{
//allocate memory and then copy name

this->name = new char[strlen(otherTask.name) + 1];
strcpy(name, otherTask.name);

//allocate memory and then copy description

this->description = new char[strlen(otherTask.description) + 1];
strcpy(description, otherTask.description);

//allocate memory and then copy date

this->date = new char[strlen(otherTask.date) + 1];
strcpy(date, otherTask.date);

}
//Accessor functions
void Task::getName(char returnName[])
{
strcpy(returnName, name);
}
void Task::getDescription(char returnDescription[])
{
strcpy(returnDescription, description);
}
void Task::getDate(char returnDate[])
{
strcpy(returnDate, date);
}

//mutator functions
void Task::setName(char newName[])
{
strcpy(name, newName);
}
void Task::setDescription(char newDescription[])
{
strcpy(description, newDescription);
}
void Task::setDate(char newDate[])
{
strcpy(date, newDate);
}

//prints a video item
void Task::printTask()
{
cout << name << ';' << description << ';' << date << endl;

}

void Task::printToFile(ofstream &outFile)
{
outFile << name << ';' << description << ';' << date << endl;
}

//assignment operator overloaded
const Task& Task::operator= (const Task& aTask)
{
strcpy(this->name, aTask.name);
this->description = aTask.description;
strcpy(this->description, aTask.description);
this->date = aTask.date;
strcpy(this->date, aTask.date);

return *this;
}
share|improve this question
3  
Can you provide a minimal example that just shows the part of the code that you don't understand, rather than just blindly pasting your entire code and expecting us to debug it for you? –  Mankarse May 24 '14 at 5:38
1  
You code looks like C... Consider using more C++ and safe to use classes like string, vector and iterators. Than your errors likely to disappear. If you need that for some sort of homework - make sure to shorten your sample (but still reproducing the error) before posting here. –  Alexei Levenkov May 24 '14 at 5:39
    
@AlexeiLevenkov this is inevitably another "write crippled C++" class where the students are forbidden to use standard libraries or C++ best practises. Its almost like we need a new tag... C++89, maybe. –  Rook May 24 '14 at 10:47
    
The part I'm struggling with is understanding what I need to do to make sure that memory for name, description, and date can be read which is the error I am getting at line 55: list = new Task[capacity]; It is probably something along the lines of what @MattMcNabb said below. It says that list is NULL. First post, I realize now that having all the code there is unnecessary @Mankarse. @AlexeiLevenkov I have to use new and delete unfortunately. –  Shepherdiss May 24 '14 at 19:40

3 Answers 3

Here is the problem:

char *name;

// ...

strcpy(name, "no course name");

The first line creates a pointer which currently does not point anywhere. Then you tell strcpy to copy that string to where the pointer is pointing, so it writes the string to "nowhere" (in practice: a semi-random memory location). This causes your access violation.

To fix this, replace the code with:

std::string name;

// ...

name = "no course name";

Do the same for description and date. Note that this means you don't need a copy-constructor or copy-assignment operator or destructor; because the default ones behave correctly.

Of course you will need to change your accssor functions (but they were badly designed anyway since the caller cannot prevent a buffer overflow):

std::string getName() const { return name; }

Also, change Task *list; to std::vector<Task> list; and stop using new and delete. The vector correctly manages memory for you.

It is simplest and easiest to do this task without using pointers or manual memory management or C-library functions such as strcpy. You'll halve your code size (at least) and it will be much less prone to error.

You may need #include <string> and #include <vector>.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your quick response, I should have included more information in the original post as there are certain requirements for this program assignment. Use dynamic array of Task to implement TaskList. Use dynamic character array to model the strings in Task, such as course name, task description and due date. The character array should be the exact size as needed, e.g "CS162" should use a character array of size 6 including '\0'. Use destructor to deallocate the dynamic memory for the object. This is why I am using new and delete. –  Shepherdiss May 24 '14 at 8:36

Since the erroe happens at allocation if an array (list = new Task[capacity]) i guess your problem is in default constructor of Task class. try playing with this constructor a liitle , i suggest allocating yor char arrays (names , descriptions and data) befor filling them.

somecode like name = new Char[14]; (and of course same for the other two)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you all for your help –  Shepherdiss May 27 '14 at 23:43

You have failed to follow the rule-of-five or the rule-of-zero.

The correct thing (rule-of-zero) would be to implement TaskList in terms of std::vector<Task>.

Seeing as your assignment demands that you use a "dynamic array", perhaps they don't want you to use std::vector. This means that you are stuck with manual memory management. This means that you need to correctly implement or remove the following functions:

//You have these
TaskList::TaskList();
TaskList::TaskList(char filename[]);
TaskList::~TaskList();

//You are missing these, this is your problem:
TaskList::TaskList(TaskList const &o); //Copy constructor
TaskList &TaskList::operator=(TaskList const &o); //Copy assignment
TaskList::TaskList(TaskList &&o); //Move constructor
TaskList &TaskList::operator=(TaskList &&o); //Move assignment

If you do not explicitly supply these functions, the compiler may automatically generate them, and the compiler-generated versions will be incorrect (for the situation where you are manually managing resources within TaskList), as they will do member-wise moves or copies, rather than copying or moving the underlying resources. When you then use these incorrect compiler-generated versions, your code will have strange behaviour.

For Task, you shouldn't be managing multiple resources at once. Use std::string, or otherwise write your own string class, and then use it to manage the string members of Task. If you do not, your code is almost guaranteed to be incorrect (due to a lack of exception safety).

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