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SELECT airline, airports.icao_code, continent, country, province, city, website 

FROM airlines 
FULL OUTER JOIN airports ON airlines.iaco_code = airports.iaco_code
FULL OUTER JOIN cities ON airports.city_id = cities.city_id
FULL OUTER JOIN provinces ON cities.province_id = provinces.province_id
FULL OUTER JOIN countries ON cities.country_id = countries.country_id
FULL OUTER JOIN continents ON countries.continent_id = continents.continent_id

It says that

You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'outer join airports on airlines.iaco_code = airports.iaco_code full outer join' at line 4

The syntax looks right to me. I've never done a lot of joins before, but I need those columns in a table which is cross referenced by various id's.

share|improve this question
    
There is no FULL OUTER JOIN syntax: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/join.html – OMG Ponies Mar 5 '10 at 3:05
up vote 39 down vote accepted

There is no FULL OUTER JOIN in MySQL. See 7.2.12. Outer Join Simplification and 12.2.8.1. JOIN Syntax:

You can emulate FULL OUTER JOIN using UNION (from MySQL 4.0.0 on):

with two tables t1, t2:

SELECT * FROM t1
LEFT JOIN t2 ON t1.id = t2.id
UNION
SELECT * FROM t1
RIGHT JOIN t2 ON t1.id = t2.id

with three tables t1, t2, t3:

SELECT * FROM t1
LEFT JOIN t2 ON t1.id = t2.id
LEFT JOIN t3 ON t2.id = t3.id
UNION
SELECT * FROM t1
RIGHT JOIN t2 ON t1.id = t2.id
LEFT JOIN t3 ON t2.id = t3.id
UNION
SELECT * FROM t1
RIGHT JOIN t2 ON t1.id = t2.id
RIGHT JOIN t3 ON t2.id = t3.id
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a tutorial you'd recommend on joins? – Josh K Mar 5 '10 at 3:19
2  
Your answer is not really correct, see Xelrach's answer, or this comment. – x-yuri Oct 16 '14 at 18:09
    
@Cletus, I keep getting 'Duplicate column name' error on the PK column they share... – Awena Apr 29 '15 at 16:52

cletus's answer isn't quite right. UNION will remove duplicate records that a FULL OUTER JOIN would include. If you need duplicates using something like:

SELECT * FROM t1
LEFT JOIN t2 ON t1.id = t2.id
LEFT JOIN t3 ON t2.id = t3.id
LEFT JOIN t4 ON t3.id = t4.id
UNION ALL
SELECT * FROM t1
RIGHT JOIN t2 ON t1.id = t2.id
LEFT JOIN t3 ON t2.id = t3.id
LEFT JOIN t4 ON t3.id = t4.id
WHERE t1.id IS NULL
UNION ALL
SELECT * FROM t1
RIGHT JOIN t2 ON t1.id = t2.id
RIGHT JOIN t3 ON t2.id = t3.id
LEFT JOIN t4 ON t3.id = t4.id
WHERE t2.id IS NULL
UNION ALL
SELECT * FROM t1
RIGHT JOIN t2 ON t1.id = t2.id
RIGHT JOIN t3 ON t2.id = t3.id
RIGHT JOIN t4 ON t3.id = t4.id
WHERE t3.id IS NULL;
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1  
Note that - if you're sufficiently pedantic and theoretical - this isn't a perfect solution either. This approach (using UNION ALL but checking if one a column in one of the JOINed tables is NULL to identify that it can't be matched to any rows in the other tables) relies upon the tables actually having at least one NOT NULL column. If there's no column that is guaranteed not to actually contain a NULL, this approach won't work. – Mark Amery Aug 31 '14 at 15:17
    
@MarkAmery: You raise a good point. For the anti-join to work correctly, the predicate in the WHERE clause needs to reference a column or expression that we know (that we are guaranteed) will not be NULL if a matching row is found. In the special case of the join predicate using an equality comparison, that equality comparison guarantees us that the value of that column will not be NULL for matched rows. It doesn't have to an equality comparison to give us that guarantee. If the join does allow NULL values for "matched" rows, we have to find/use a non-NULL expression. – spencer7593 May 7 '15 at 15:57
    
@MarkAmery: This query isn't relying on the tables having a NOT NULL column. Rather, this query relies on the join predicate (the condition in the ON clause) to guarantee a non-NULL value for a column in a "matched" row. This relies on the behavior of the equality comparison operator when used with NULL values. (We know that foo = NULL will not return TRUE, even when foo IS NULL.) – spencer7593 May 7 '15 at 16:05

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