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I would like to change this Makefile:

SHELL := /bin/bash
PATH  := node_modules/.bin:$(PATH)

boot:
    @supervisor         \
      --harmony         \
      --watch etc,lib       \
      --extensions js,json      \
      --no-restart-on error     \
        lib

test:
    NODE_ENV=test mocha         \
      --harmony             \
      --reporter spec       \
        test

clean:
    @rm -rf node_modules

.PHONY: test clean

to:

SHELL := /bin/bash
PATH  := node_modules/.bin:$(PATH)

boot:
    @supervisor         \
      --harmony         \
      --watch etc,lib       \
      --extensions js,json      \
      --no-restart-on error     \
        lib

test: NODE_ENV=test
test:
    mocha                   \
      --harmony             \
      --reporter spec       \
        test

clean:
    @rm -rf node_modules

.PHONY: test clean

Unfortunately the second one does not work (the node process still runs with the default NODE_ENV.

What did I miss?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Make variables are not exported into the environment of processes make invokes... by default. However you can use make's export to force them to do so. Change:

test: NODE_ENV = test

to this:

test: export NODE_ENV = test

(assuming you have a sufficiently modern version of GNU make).

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I have GNU make 3.81, and all: <\n\t>export PROJ_ROOT=$(CURDIR)<\n\t>echo $(PROJ_ROOT)<\n> outputs the correct expansion for the first row, but only echo for the second one. PROJ_ROOT is not set after running make. Spaces around = give "bad variable name" for export. Having the first row as prerequisite as in your example gives "commands commence before first target" –  Gauthier Oct 30 '14 at 9:18
    
@Gauthier yes of course. That's not what I wrote. You added a <\n\t> after the all:, which is not in my example. My example is intended to be used as written: it's defining a target-specific variable, NOT adding a command to the recipe. Also you cannot use a recipe and a target-specific variable on a target at the same time: you have to write the target twice. See the second example in the question, and ask a new question if this doesn't help explain it: there's not enough space or formatting in comments. –  MadScientist Oct 30 '14 at 12:00

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