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i Have read JPEG format into char array

char* FileName = "NewI.jpg";
FILE* ImageFile = fopen(FileName, "rb");
if (!ImageFile) {
    return -1;
}
fseek(ImageFile, 0, SEEK_END);
unsigned long int FileLength = ftell(ImageFile);
fseek(ImageFile, 0, SEEK_SET);
char* Bytes = (char*)malloc(FileLength * sizeof(char));
fread(Bytes, FileLength, sizeof(unsigned char), ImageFile);
fclose(ImageFile);

how can i get RGB for each pixel?

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4  
You don't, not that easily anyway. Remember that JPEG images are compressed so you have to decode the data properly first. This is not trivial, and there's a reason there are libraries for this. –  Joachim Pileborg May 25 at 7:11
    
You should indeed try a library. Check out libjpeg, FreeImage or similar libraries –  Banex May 25 at 7:29
1  
You could also load the jpeg file into your favorite paint program, and save it as a bmp file. BMP files are uncompressed, so it's easier to extract the RGB values. –  user3386109 May 25 at 7:41
    
Lawyer-mode on: Even BMPs could contain compressed data. In theory... –  deviantfan May 25 at 8:39
    
@deviantfan Yup, in theory... but most paint programs are fairly practical :) –  user3386109 May 25 at 19:36

1 Answer 1

This is too long to fit a comment but is intended as a comment.

The problem you face is that there is a lengthy sequence of steps between the raw values in a JPEG file and RGB values.

To summarize them:

  1. Huffman decoding
  2. Run length decoding
  3. Dequantization
  4. Inserve discrete cosine transform
  5. Upsampling
  6. Conversion from the YCbCr color space to RGB

The first steps have to be handled differently for progressive and sequential JPEG streams.

Unless you want to do a lot of development, you would need to use a library to perform these steps for you (as suggested previously). Reading JPEG requires bit level programming and absolute perfection. A one bit error in processing will completely throw the decoding off.

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